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PHILOSOPHY

PHIL-685
Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including: medical ethics, philosophy of language, advanced philosophical argumentation, philosophy of reason and passion, bio-ethics, and post-modernism. Usually meets with PHIL-485. Usually offered every term.

PHIL-685
001
PHILOSOPHY
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Latin American Philosophy

This course presents a range of Latin American thinkers chosen to demonstrate the power, vitality, and usefulness of Latin American intellectual life for North American social and cultural issues. Topics include the quest for identity, marginality, mexicanidad, mestizaje, critiques of power, feminist philosophy, social justice, liberation, phenomenology, and indigenous peoples. Meets with PHIL-485 001.

PHIL-685
002
PHILOSOPHY
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Philosophy and Film

This course analyzes film philosophically. Although it is clear that many films depict philosophical themes, the emphasis is on concepts of philosophical aesthetics in film, such as the particularity of the medium, authorship, the ontology of film, the role of narratives, and the response of the audience. In terms of application, the course focuses on the case of Iranian cinema and its philosophical relevance. Meets with PHIL-485 002.

PHIL-685
003
PHILOSOPHY
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Philosophy of Science

What makes science science? And how can we be certain of the answer, especially as scientific theories change? The power of calling something "science" continues to have political and philosophical consequences for society. This course examines how philosophers investigate questions concerning the nature of science including problems about evidence, explanation, and the relationship between theory and knowledge. In addition to reading key texts in the field, the class considers insights from feminist philosophy of science and science and technology studies (STS) to develop a critical analysis of the relationships among science, policy, politics, and democracy. Meets with PHIL-485 003.

PHIL-685
001
PHILOSOPHY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Marxism

This course is about Marx and his followers in nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students begin with Marx's philosophical writings, with a particular focus on the Philosophical Manuscripts and the German Ideology. Adorno, Macuse, Gramsci, Althusser, Sartre Laclau andMouffe, Derrida, and Zizek, Lacan are the main Marxists studied. Meets with PHIL-485 001.

PHIL-685
002
PHILOSOPHY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Philosophical Views of Habit

Given the role of habit in addiction, self-deception, ignorance, and moral numbness, "habit" seems to be synonymous with "bad habit" and dangerous, or base, in principle. However, philosophical analyses of our capacity to make and break habits also involve discussions of knowledge, embodiment, and language. If we are creatures of habit, then the idea of what that means can lead to important questions in moral psychology and many other fields. In this course, a few major theories of habit ae discussed, including Aristotle and his discussion of human excellence, as well as concepts of meaning and truth in American Pragmatism, German and French phenomenology, and twentieth century structuralisms. Ultimately, students engage in nuanced discussions of contemporary problems that we inhabit, quite literally, in feminist reflections on oppression, ignorance, stereotypes, and implicit bias. Meets with PHIL-485 002.