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PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC-597
Topics in Psychology (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Each section is an intensive course in a specialized area of psychology. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

PSYC-597
001
PSYCHOLOGY
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics in Psychology (3)

Behavioral Neuroscience of Addiction

This seminar explores the science of addiction with an emphasis on current research in the areas of behavior and neuroscience. Students read and discuss selected texts, original research papers, and reviews on theories of drug abuse and addiction, addiction research methods, models of drug abuse, and addiction treatment. This seminar provides students with an understanding of the current state of addictions science.

PSYC-597
002
PSYCHOLOGY
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics in Psychology (3)

Regression, Mediation, and Moderation in Psychological Research

This course focuses on data analysis and interpretation in psychological research. Students learn about mediation and moderation through the use of multiple and logistic regression. The course is hands-on and students learn how to use statistical software to perform each type of data analysis. The primary aims of this course are: for students to be able to apply the statistical methods learned in the class to their own research and for students to learn to better interpret data analyses that are encountered in scholarly journal articles.

PSYC-597
003
PSYCHOLOGY
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics in Psychology (3)

The Neuroscience of Autism

The incidence of autism has risen rapidly over the past 30 years, triggering an increased interest in determining the neurobiological bases of this complex developmental disorder. This course provides an up-to-date understanding of the current research focusing on the neuroscience of autism. An overview of basic brain development, neuroscience methods, and the clinical description of autism is followed by an in-depth analysis of what is known about the etiology of autism. Topics covered include: genetics; animal models; differences in brain structure, neurochemistry, connectivity, and function; the social brain; language differences; repetitive behaviors and restricted interests; and the efficacy of treatment programs. While there are no prerequisites, a background including basic neuroscience or physiological psychology is recommended. This course is also appropriate for students who have taken Advanced Developmental Neuroscience and are interested in a more in-depth understanding of autism.