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INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-619
Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including international economic policy coordination, emerging capital markets, international environmental policy, political risk analysis, international relations of Japan, preventive diplomacy, United States and Cuba, and nonviolence. Usually offered every term.

SIS-619
001
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Global International Relations Theory

This foundation course approaches international relations theory with an interdisciplinary perspective and presents the major paradigms existing in the field. It sets normative and analytical definitions of priorities and goals and establishes the boundaries of the field. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
002
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

History of Global Politics

This course provides historical context on change and continuity in the global political system. It examines the rise, fall, and evolution of the political units that have comprised the system, including city-states, empires, and socio-cultural political units such as world religions as well as the modern nation-state and addresses how each of these different forms of political units have affected the practice of global politics across the centuries. The course compares parallel sub-global systems of politics common before the contemporary era of interconnected global politics, particularly politics within the European state system to those in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Finally, the course takes a historical perspective on change and continuity in the variety of actors and organizing structures in global politics to assess how conceptions of global society, norms, and values as well as power and self-interest have shaped peace, conflict, prosperity, and development across history. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Foundations of Global Governance

As transnational challenges intensify, the question of whether states and societies can cooperate effectively has become central. An array of formal international and regional organizations and less formal governance efforts have developed as a response. This course examines the complex interactions among these governance efforts and national governments, individuals and civil society. It considers the challenges and constraints facing global governance and multilateralism and identifies newer and emerging forms that are more attuned to the needs and demands of the twenty-first century. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
005
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

European Union and Global Governance

This course explores and analyzes the many ways in which the European Union (EU) has engaged with the world and has shaped global governance across a range of issue areas. The course begins by exploring the concept of global governance along with an introduction to the EU. The general analytical frameworks of global governance will then be applied to a series of case studies on issue areas in which the EU has been engaged in the wider world, including international trade, the global financial framework, international human rights and humanitarian issues, and regulatory policy.

SIS-619
007
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Energy and Security in Eurasia

This course explores an important driver of international relations and national security, the connection between energy and security. Europe is a large and growing energy market, increasingly depending on imported resources. The course provides a strategic overview of European energy security, the current and potential future role for Eurasian energy supplies, as well as different scenarios for long-term energy solutions.

SIS-619
009
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Insurgency and Counterinsurgency

In an age of globalization but unequal distribution of economic resources and political power, insurgencies pose one of the greatest challenges to the established order, whether that order is a democracy, monarchy, dictatorship or theocracy. This course analyzes the historical roots of insurgencies and counterinsurgencies, beginning with the Roman Empire, and assesses the causes, conduct, and consequences of these actions, with an emphasis on applications since World War II. Though military aspects are included, the principal focus is on the political, economic, and social forces that have informed and directed insurgents and those who oppose them. Through an understanding of the history of this complex and often misinterpreted field, students seek to define the issues these movements pose and create a framework to assess the factors that precede their rise and shape their outcome.

SIS-619
010
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

The Law of War

This course examines the law regulating the conduct of war and other armed conflicts, including the history and development of the law. Special attention is given to how the law of armed conflict has been employed, challenged, changed, or modified during the United States' ongoing untraditional war against a transnational non-state actor. Students grapple with the same questions that confront practitioners and policy-makers on some of the most interesting and controversial issues of our time, such as detention policy, drone warfare, status of participants to the hostilities, and preemptive force.

SIS-619
011
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Leadership of Global Organizations

This course gives students an understanding of public affairs and its role in achieving the strategic objectives of an organization. All organizations--business, government, non-government (NGO)--operate in a larger environment, in which individuals, groups and other organizations can affect their ability, positively or negatively, to meet these objectives. The role of public affairs is to monitor the external environment and to manage the organization's response to it. The mission of the public affairs function is to further the organization's strategic objectives while maintaining its legitimacy or "license to operate" among its stakeholders.

SIS-619
012
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Migration and Security

Few issues pose as significant a challenge to states as international migration does, affecting nearly all critical aspects of governance. The myriad ways that immigration and refugee flows affect state interests, both material and idealistic, creates highly contentious politics where domestic interests clash and defining a national interest is an elusive quest for the state. This course offers students a broad overview of migration and refugee dynamics, and identifies those aspects most challenging to state governance. This includes understanding the factors that generate migration and refugee flows, as well as the politics they generate, both international and domestic. The course examines the security implications (broadly defined) of global migration and refugee flows, including defense, homeland security, and economic and societal dimensions. It also considers carefully the human rights implications of these dynamics. The course also examines policy development over the past half-century in a comparative perspective with an eye towards identifying new challenges and generating questions for future research.

SIS-619
014
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Political Risk Analysis

Political risk analysis techniques allow practitioners to gauge the political conditions that would be beneficial or harmful to investment and other activities. This methodology course covers approaches to political risk analysis and applications.

SIS-619
015
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Refugees, Migration, and Trafficking

In an increasingly mobile world, millions of people are on the move, crossing international borders, or relocating within their own country's political boundaries. These movements are brought on by the search for employment, better wages, and higher standards of living; to escape persecution and violence; and as a consequence of the network of commercial human exploitation that involves the buying and selling of people for prostitution, forced labor, domestic service, irregular inter-country adoption and transnational marriages. Using an international and global perspective, this course explores some of the issues arising out of this voluntary and forced migration of people who are labeled refugees, internally displaced persons (IDPs), trafficked persons, temporary laborers, or more broadly as migrants. It lays emphasis on the important laws, international institutions, and actors that respond to questions of migrants, refugees and human trafficking, e.g., International Organization for Migration (IOM); the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC); and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR; the experiences of these three categories of mobile populations; the contributions and problems of humanitarian assistance that respond to them; and how these categories of people relate to questions and concerns of international security

SIS-619
018
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Transnational Organized Crime

Transnational criminals and terrorists interact particularly in conflict regions and regions of frozen conflict. Terrorists in many regions of the world depend on organized crime to finance their activities and provide them logistical support. This course examines the diverse forms of interaction of transnational crime and corruption, with the relationship of these different groups to the state a central part of the analysis. The class looks at the security, human rights, and social consequences of this interaction.

SIS-619
020
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Peacemaking and Intractable Conflict

This course provides an in-depth analysis of both official and unofficial third party peacemaking interventions in intractable conflict, as represented by various forms of mediation and by problem-solving methods captured under the approach of interactive conflict resolution. The focus of interventions is primarily on applications of mediation and third party consultation, both separately and in combination, to violent and protracted ethnopolitical conflicts with international ramifications. In addition to discussing current issues in mediation and interactive conflict resolution, the course assesses the potential for complementarity between official (Track I) and unofficial (Track II) diplomacy through an evaluation of selected cases.

SIS-619
022
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Economics of Violence and Peace

This course examines political economic issues concerning war and peace, including civil war, terrorism, and insurgency. Taking a broad view which emphasizes the interaction between economic and non-economic factors, including religion and culture, it discusses economic causes of wars, focusing on economic grievances, resources, environmental problems, and poverty; economic consequences of wars; and economic measures for conflict prevention and resolution, as well as post-conflict reconstruction.

SIS-619
026
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Peacebuilding in Divided Society

This course explores various peacebuilding approaches that can be utilized in multi-ethnic and divided societies. It focuses on the three possible levels of intervention (grassroots, middle out and top down) often implemented by peacemakers in their attempts to bring change to the dynamics of deeply rooted conflict societies. As a primary case study for this course, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is critically reviewed and examined. Multiple dimensions of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, as well as the relationship between Palestinians and Jews within Israel, are investigated.

SIS-619
027
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

U.S.-Iran Conflict and Reconciliation

This course provides a basis for understanding the political, economic, and security dimensions of Iran's role in regional politics, the conflict in the U.S.-Iran relations, and reconciliation as an important factor and determinant of stability in the Middle East. Organized along historical and thematic lines from Iran being a front-line state during the Cold War to it becoming the home of an Islamic revolution, the course focuses on the issues of culture and politics, thought and practice, to elucidate aspects of tension and conflict between the U.S. and Iran and its implication for the region. Students study conflict resolution theories and explore debates in the field as applicable to the U.S.-Iran relations and look at new alternatives for dialogue and opportunities for negotiation in the process of reconciliation in a comparative historical perspective. Course includes issues of reform and radicalism, Islam as a political force, Iran's role in regional politics, and the search for new alternatives in cultural engagement and diplomacy in resolving conflict.

SIS-619
028
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Theories and Methods of Nonviolence

Examines the successes and criticizes the shortfalls of six major nonviolent struggles of the twentieth century. Students sharpen their capacity for critical thinking by applying insights from these struggles to current problems in the United States.

SIS-619
D01
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SUMMER 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Great Powers Politics: Diplomacy, Order, and War

In some ways, it is impossible to understand the dynamics of international security without understanding the role of great powers in international society. This course helps students to unpack and discover the critical role that great power politics plays in ordering international politics. The course is broadly divided into four sections. First, the course specifies the concept of great powers, with a focus on the sources and nature of their political influence; then the course focuses on the manner in which great powers interact with one another and the institutions used to mediate their relationships. In the third section, students are introduced to concrete examples of great power order such as the Concert of Europe, the League of Nations, and the UN. Finally, how great power discord comes about and the consequences of this discord for international security is discussed.

SIS-619
030
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Global Political Economy

This course is concerned with the scope of political economy. The focus is on the origins of the modern global political economy and its institutional structure. It examines contemporary issues in political economy, using the division of labor as an organizing concept, and explores the prospects for global restructuring at the turn of the century.

SIS-619
032
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

The Economics of Transnational Crime

The exponential growth and success of a globally-integrated economy has brought along as its most negative foil an equally fast expansion in illicit trades, including weapons, people, drugs and money. The emergence of such illegal transnational activities and their enormous profitability, constitute a major challenge to national authorities that are ill-prepared to confront them effectively within their borders. It is also essential to understand the operations and strategies of the transnational criminal groups, their flexible "business plans" and constantly adjusting organizations, and their interactions with law enforcement forces and national governments. This course explores all these elements plus the failed ways in which the criminal corporations are currently being confronted and the best alternative public policies to deal with them.

SIS-619
034
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Conflict and Development

An examination of the way in which development processes, strategies, and policies increase or decrease local, national, and international conflicts, as well as the ways in which conflicts at all levels condition development choices.

SIS-619
035
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

History of Global Politics

This course provides historical context on change and continuity in the global political system. It examines the rise, fall, and evolution of the political units that have comprised the system, including city-states, empires, and socio-cultural political units such as world religions as well as the modern nation-state and addresses how each of these different forms of political units have affected the practice of global politics across the centuries. The course compares parallel sub-global systems of politics common before the contemporary era of interconnected global politics, particularly politics within the European state system to those in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Finally, the course takes a historical perspective on change and continuity in the variety of actors and organizing structures in global politics to assess how conceptions of global society, norms, and values as well as power and self-interest have shaped peace, conflict, prosperity, and development across history. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
040T
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Seminar in International Affairs

This course introduces students to, establishes a theoretical foundation of knowledge in, and provides exposure to experts in the main fields of concentration available in the graduate programs of the School of International Service: international politics, international law and organizations, international peace and conflict resolution, comparative and regional studies, international communication, international economic relations, international development, global environmental politics, and U.S. foreign policy. The course improves students' understanding of these fields of study through experiential education and active learning; immerses students in both the theory and practice of these areas through meetings with experts and site visits to relevant agencies and organizations; explores relevant career opportunities and prepares students to pursue professional careers in these fields; and develops academic and professional skills relevant to these subject areas. Prerequisite: admission to the Graduate Gateway Program.

SIS-619
036
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Governance, Development and Corruption

This course explores the scope of corruption around the world. It considers sources and effects of these practices, and the practical possibilities for controlling or reducing corruption, especially in African contexts.

SIS-619
037
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Identity and Politics in Middle East

This course discusses the sources of identity in Middle Eastern countries, including tribalism, nationalism, and political Islam. The course readings and discussions attempt to understand state-society relations in the region and analyze some of its most pressing problems its countries and peoples are facing. The class addresses issues related to minorities, gender, youth problems, and political change.

SIS-619
N02L
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SUMMER 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Principles of Economics

Overview of fundamental principles of modern economic theory. Incorporates foundational concepts of both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Concepts include efficiency, comparative advantage, market structure, market failures, unemployment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policy, and balance of payments. Open only to students in the MA International Relations.

SIS-619
039
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Foundations of Global Governance

As transnational challenges intensify, the question of whether states and societies can cooperate effectively has become central. An array of formal international and regional organizations and less formal governance efforts have developed as a response. This course examines the complex interactions among these governance efforts and national governments, individuals and civil society. It considers the challenges and constraints facing global governance and multilateralism and identifies newer and emerging forms that are more attuned to the needs and demands of the twenty-first century. Meets with SIS-619 003.

SIS-619
N03L
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SUMMER 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Introduction to Economic Theory

Overview of fundamental principles of modern economic theory. Incorporates foundational concepts of both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Concepts include efficiency, comparative advantage, market structure, market failures, unemployment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policy, and balance of payments. Open only to students in the MA International Relations.

SIS-619
001
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Dialogue: Approaches and Applications

This course explores different theories and approaches to dialogue as a conflict transformation framework. It focuses on various types of identity-based conflict and the use of dialogue approaches and tools to transform and change the dynamics of ethnic, religious, and cultural conflicts. Interfaith, interethnic, and intercultural dialogue processes and case studies are explored and examined, especially their design, process, and possible impact.

SIS-619
002
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Peace Education

This advanced seminar provides students with an overview of peace education in terms of the main theories, concepts and methods associated with the field. The course covers basic definitions of peace and conflict resolution along with approaches such as nonviolence, cross-cultural understanding and peacebuilding. The process of learning emphasizes cooperative engagement and respect for diversity to create peaceful learning communities. The importance of values for social justice, ecological balance and global awareness is affirmed.

SIS-619
004
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Post-War Peacebuilding

This course considers strategic approaches to peacebuilding and conflict resolution interventions using case studies from several post-conflict regions.

SIS-619
007
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Economics of Violence and Peace

This course examines political economic issues concerning war and peace, including civil war, terrorism, and insurgency. Taking a broad view which emphasizes the interaction between economic and non-economic factors, including religion and culture, it discusses economic causes of wars, focusing on economic grievances, resources, environmental problems, and poverty; economic consequences of wars; and economic measures for conflict prevention and resolution, as well as post-conflict reconstruction.

SIS-619
010
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Human Rights and Conflict

This course explores the increasingly relevant intersection of international human rights and conflict. It introduces students to many of the ethical and operational issues that policymakers, diplomats, human rights and humanitarian aid workers, soldiers, peace-keepers and civilian police face in responding to today's conflicts. In so doing, the course also provides students with basic understanding of humanitarian law. The class explores human rights as a cause or consequence of violent conflict; holding militaries and paramilitaries responsible for violations; peace negotiations and human rights advocacy; the truth vs. justice debate in truth commissions and war crimes trials; civil society as human rights safeguard; human rights implications of the war on terrorism; and the human rights of refugees and displaced people.

SIS-619
006
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Environmental Peacemaking

The focus of the emerging interdisciplinary field of environmental peacemaking is to identify ways that the environment, natural and human, provides opportunities for building bridges of collaboration between conflicting parties. In this course, students deal with concepts from ecopolitics, environmental security studies, international relations, and conflict resolution and develop an understanding of the theoretical framework informing the emerging environmental peacemaking paradigm. It also touches upon the nascent field of environmental peacebuilding, with its focus on relationship-building between conflict actors. The course examines the interactions among violence, conflict, peace, security, and the natural environment. It is structured to create the context for students to address questions including what impact violent conflict has on the environment; is environmental degradation itself a source or trigger of violent conflict; and how environmental cooperation can be used to promote peace and sustainable development.

SIS-619
005
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Comparative Peace Processes

Peace processes are far more complex than any other kind of international or intergroup negotiation and involve bargaining between the principal conflict parties and among their own internal factions and constituencies, and sometimes involve outside interveners who want to mediate among the parties. While classic approaches to peace processes tend to either emphasize the internal and external political contexts to explain success or failure, or test the theories of international relations related to the termination of war, this course looks at peace processes as complex negotiations that should lead to the end of armed conflict and continue into implementation and the reconstruction of peaceful social and political relations. The course examines peace processes that have failed, those that appear to be succeeding, and those whose outcome remains unclear. Students gain an understanding of the options for structuring such a negotiation, the issues that need to be resolved, the trade-offs and tensions that are involved, and the dangers and challenges along the way. Cases from the last three decades of peace negotiations are analyzed in depth to identify the dynamics, patterns, and factors involved.

SIS-619
009
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Localizing Peace

This course is premised on a comprehensive understanding of peace that explores local capacities for peacebuilding and sustainable development in a multitude of diverse cultural and religious contexts. Peace at global, regional, and national levels is unlikely to take root unless such capacities are established, for ultimately peace must be made and practiced on a local basis. The course addresses the vital need to make active use of local peace resources and to pursue forms of local-international collaboration that sustainably yield locally valid and effective solutions, currently an emerging area in the field of conflict resolution. The course also develops practical frameworks and raises critical questions for identifying, eliciting, and tapping local resources to enhance capacity for local solutions to conflict.

SIS-619
014
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Youth and Conflict

This course examines the relationship between youth and conflict, starting with an exploration of varying definitions of youth as a biological, cultural, and political category. The class discusses youth and children both as victims of conflict and as perpetrators of violence, as well as youth and nation, the effect of conflict on educational systems, the special concerns of girls, the efforts of international child protection agencies and NGOs, children's testimonies of violence, and youth-sponsored peace-building activities internationally.

SIS-619
020OL
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Big Data and Text Mining in International Affairs Research

This online course helps students understand the tools and techniques used in contemporary analysis of large-scale unstructured textual data with applications for international affairs and a range of social science research topics. While the concept of Big Data is relative, and how it is defined varies from field to field, text-based data is perhaps the largest single source of data available to the modern investigator. This includes numerous genres of textual data, from email archives, websites, twitter feeds and other social media, blog posts, speeches, annual reports, published articles, and much more. In the aggregate, these sources can easily run into thousands and thousands of discrete items. This form of Big Data is particularly challenging to the analyst using only traditional forms of content analysis. In this course, students learn techniques to help them begin to see the power of computational approaches to the large-scale analysis of unstructured text-based data. Essentially, this course helps to find the proverbial needle in the international affairs data haystack.

SIS-619
015
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

International Security in Asia

This course introduces students to alternative ways of looking at Asia's emerging security order using different theories and perspectives on international relations. It also informs students with a comprehensive background in Asian security problems and challenges including the rise of China, Japan, and India, territorial disputes in South and East China Sea, energy and maritime security issues, arms races, intervention, domestic strife and democratization, the role of the United States in Asian security and its military presence and bilateral alliances in the region, and the security architecture of Asia for the twenty-first century.

SIS-619
021
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Global International Relations Theory

This foundation course approaches international relations theory with an interdisciplinary perspective and presents the major paradigms existing in the field. It sets normative and analytical definitions of priorities and goals and establishes the boundaries of the field. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
022
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Foundations of Global Security

This foundation course provides students with a survey of the main theories and concepts related to international security and considers a range of historical and contemporary cases. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
023
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Foundations of Global Security

This foundation course provides students with a survey of the main theories and concepts related to international security and considers a range of historical and contemporary cases. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
024
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Foundations of Global Governance

As transnational challenges intensify, the question of whether states and societies can cooperate effectively has become central. An array of formal international and regional organizations and less formal governance efforts have developed as a response. This course examines the complex interactions among these governance efforts and national governments, individuals and civil society. It considers the challenges and constraints facing global governance and multilateralism and identifies newer and emerging forms that are more attuned to the needs and demands of the twenty-first century. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
025
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Transnational Crime and Terrorism

Transnational criminals and terrorists interact, particularly in conflict regions and regions of frozen conflict. Terrorists in many regions of the world depend on organized crime to finance their activities and provide them logistical support. This course examines the diverse forms of interaction of transnational crime and corruption, with the relationship of these different groups to the state a central part of the analysis. The class looks at the security, human rights, and social consequences of this interaction.

SIS-619
031
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

International Law and the Global Order

This course focuses on the role of international law in interstate relations and global order; analyzes the contribution of different international institutions in making of international law; and examines the effectiveness of international law in maintaining order in important areas of global affairs with emphasis on cases, treaties, and other documents.

SIS-619
012
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Islam and Human Rights

Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this course considers the different ways in which invocations of Islam and questions of human rights converge in the Muslim world. In addition to an overview of prevailing human rights conditions, the course examines the ways Islam and the human rights come to be formulated as compatible or incompatible, or somewhere in between. Students become familiar with the spectrum of Muslim perspectives on the international human rights framework and its applicability to the Muslim world. Particular attention is paid to the social and political dynamics behind differing views of human rights in the Muslim world and how these dynamics are in flux as a result of the wave of protest and change sweeping the Middle East. The course concludes with several contemporary case studies including human rights in the Egyptian revolution/post-revolution, Islamic feminism in Iran, the impact of the War on Terror on views of human rights in the Muslim world, and human rights under occupation in Iraq.

SIS-619
013
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Policies for Constructive Intergroup Relations

Over at least the past century and a half, the United States and many other countries have been addressing the question of how ethnopolitical groups can function together well within the boundaries of a single country. This course examines past and current policies, as expressed in law and institution building, to creating trusting, cooperative intergroup relations in multiethnic societies, accommodate diverse populations and to ensure justice and fairness in situations where prejudice has held sway. The class looks at a variety of constitutional models designed to share power, and study recently written peace treaties and constitutions to see how these models have been adopted. In addition students become familiar with the most salient debates about such issues as immigration policy, education policy, affirmative action, multiculturalism and the proper nature of religious toleration, using case studies from Australia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canada, France, Germany, India, Iraq, Israel, Lebanon, Malaysia, Pakistan, the UK, and the United States.

SIS-619
033
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

The United Nations

This course explores the birth, evolution, and performance of the United Nations. Students also examine how (and how well) the UN has addressed specific issues through cases studies in areas that include peacekeeping, environment, poverty reduction, humanitarian assistance, and the war in Iraq.

SIS-619
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Gender and Conflict

This seminar examines the gender dimensions of human wrongs associated with violent conflict. Students are encouraged to ask questions about the complexity of human rights problems and consider aspects of human rights problems made invisible to the outside world by silencing or obscuring the victims. Students also explore how each aspect of conflict is gendered. Of primary concern is gendered forms of resistance to and cooperation with agents of war and peace, the role gender plays in the militaries and militarization, the impact of militarization on the lives of men and women in both war and peace time, and recent legal and political attempts to address gender-based violence in human rights.

SIS-619
034T
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Seminar in International Affairs

This course introduces students to, establishes a theoretical foundation of knowledge in, and provides exposure to experts in the main fields of concentration available in the graduate programs of the School of International Service: international politics, international law and organizations, international peace and conflict resolution, comparative and regional studies, international communication, international economic relations, international development, global environmental politics, and U.S. foreign policy. The course improves students' understanding of these fields of study through experiential education and active learning; immerses students in both the theory and practice of these areas through meetings with experts and site visits to relevant agencies and organizations; explores relevant career opportunities and prepares students to pursue professional careers in these fields; and develops academic and professional skills relevant to these subject areas. Prerequisite: admission to the Graduate Gateway Program.