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INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-620
Studies in Global Environmental Politics (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include water; food and agriculture; climate and energy; policy analysis; sustainable design; comparative environmental politics; and environmental security. Usually offered every term.

SIS-620
002
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Studies in Global Environmental Politics (3)

Political Ecology of Food and Agriculture

Food presents a unique lens to examine political, cultural, and technological connections to environment and development. This course provides students with an introduction to political ecology and its approach to global food studies. Students use political ecology and social theory paradigms to examine industrial and alternative food networks, including their impacts on the environment, communities, and rural development. Students also examine how food policy and the global food trading system shape these networks and local environments, communities, and development practices.

SIS-620
001
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Studies in Global Environmental Politics (3)

Global Climate Change

An interdisciplinary look at the history, science, policy, and politics of preventing global climate change. This course, for non-specialists as well as environmental studies students, focuses on how we created one of humanity's biggest problems and how to solve it, particularly through education, communications, organizing, and advocacy.

SIS-620
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Studies in Global Environmental Politics (3)

Water Governance

Examines international and cross-national dimensions of water politics and policy. Major themes include international and comparative water law; cooperation and conflict in shared river basins; water, poverty, and economic development; transnational activism and civil society; water, violent conflict, and peacebuilding; water and climate change. Meets with SIS-620 006.

SIS-620
006
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Studies in Global Environmental Politics (3)

Water Governance

Examines international and cross-national dimensions of water politics and policy. Major themes include international and comparative water law; cooperation and conflict in shared river basins; water, poverty, and economic development; transnational activism and civil society; water, violent conflict, and peacebuilding; water and climate change. Open only to students in MA in Global Environmental Policy or MA in International Affairs: Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Meets with SIS-620 003.

SIS-620
D01
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Studies in Global Environmental Politics (3)

Introduction to Environmental Economics

This course provides an overview of the uses of economics in the context of environmental issues and of the key topics in environmental policy today. The class introduces the market forces that affect the environment and discuss the relative merits of different methods of pollution control such as taxes or cap-and-trade. Students learn how to value the benefits and costs of an improvement in air quality or of the protection of a natural park. This knowledge is then be applied to policy topics such as the links between economic growth and the environment, or the question of environmental justice.

SIS-620
007
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Studies in Global Environmental Politics (3)

Sustainable Design and LEED Training

Following the structure of the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for green building rating systems, this course combines discussions of theories on sustainable design; field work on specific environmental topics ranging from sustainable sites through innovation in design; and directed study of the LEED Reference Guides and rating systems, with the goal of achieving the LEED Green Associate credential through examination.

SIS-620
005
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Studies in Global Environmental Politics (3)

Introduction to Environmental Economics

This course provides an overview of the uses of economics in the context of environmental issues and of the key topics in environmental policy today. The class introduces the market forces that affect the environment and discusses the relative merits of different methods of pollution control such as taxes or cap-and-trade. Students learn how to value the benefits and costs of an improvement in air quality or of the protection of a natural park. This knowledge is then be applied to policy topics such as the links between economic growth and the environment, or the question of environmental justice. Prerequisite: ECON-603 or equivalent.

SIS-620
001
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Studies in Global Environmental Politics (3)

Policy Analysis for Global Environmental Politics

Provides critical literacy in the major policy-analytic techniques used in environmental policy, including cost-benefit analysis, risk assessment, impact assessment, multi-stakeholder processes, effectiveness assessment, conflict/post-conflict assessment, sustainability indicators, and social marketing. Emphasis is placed on analytic techniques most commonly used in and around international institutions.

SIS-620
002
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Studies in Global Environmental Politics (3)

Political Ecology of Waste

How much waste a society produces, and what it does with it says a lot about societal attitudes towards nature, abundance and thrift, to say nothing of prevailing political and economic structures and ideologies and environmental conditions. This course examines the myriad ways that waste is produced and managed in developed and developing countries, with an eye towards uncovering how waste management paradigms are integrated with consumption and production patterns and influenced by geography and political-economy. Different levels of economic development influence what is valued as a resource as opposed to a waste material. Varying geographic conditions, from amount of land available per capita to scarcity of resources such as wood fiber and minerals influence policies pertaining to levels of waste produced, and what is done with it after it has no value as a commodity. Finally, the nature and scale of governance structures, prevailing ideologies, and how political institutions reflect or reproduce certain economic arrangements has tremendous impact on the overall direction of waste management.