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INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-106
First Year Seminar (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, not repeatable for credit. This seminar course introduces first year SIS students to critical issues in world affairs. May be taken A-F only. Prerequisite: first-year SIS students with permission of SIS Undergraduate Advising Office

SISU-106
005
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

The Break-Up of Britain?

There are immense challenges underway in Britain that have led to questions not only about national identity, but also about the legacies of the past and their impact on British political and economic development. With a tumultuous marriage with Europe, leading to calls for a referendum, and possible "brexit" from the European Union, a pending Scottish referendum that may dissolve the union, the emergence of populist, radical parties challenging the established political party system, the calls for greater immigration controls, a crumbling welfare state and growing inequality, Britain is in turmoil. Starting from Ken Loach's film, The Spirit of 45, This course examines and traces the political, economic, and societal changes facing contemporary Britain.

SISU-106
007
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

The U.S. and Other Worlds

This course examines a number of global issues from a non-Western perspective, including societal values (free speech vs. religious rights, gender equality vs. gender inequality, etc.); environmental degradation; human rights; food security/insecurity; civil liberties vs. internal security; use of force (what concepts of justice govern the use of force and how they vary across cultures); development (is it imperialist of the West to assert that much of the world is not developed?); and human security.

SISU-106
001
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Transnational Migration

This interdisciplinary seminar focuses on transnational migration. It analyzes the causes and effects of transnational migration, i.e., why people leave their homelands and for what purposes; the different types of migration, and the key consequences on sending and receiving societies. Among the topics covered are immigration regulations and changing notions of the nation; migration and tourism development; international education initiatives and exchanges; and debates between the human trafficking and transnational migration for work perspectives.

SISU-106
012
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Weak and Failed States

This course examines weak and failed states and their role in the world order. The class studies how colonial empires, war, and internal politics contribute to state collapse and the effect these nations and regions have on U.S. foreign policy and the international community.

SISU-106
003
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

The Psychology and Politics of Genocide

This interdisciplinary course explores the psychology of genocide as a form of mass killing and the social and political circumstances that facilitate it. The course theme is examined through the following case studies: the Holocaust, Stalin's genocides, the Cambodian genocide, ethnic cleansing and genocide in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the Rwandan genocide. A major research component of the course work is conducted by consulting the archival collections of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.

SISU-106
004
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Culture and Power in International Education

Around the globe, education is becoming recognized as a fundamental human right key to the development of individuals, communities, and nations. Indeed, education can help empower, open opportunities, combat poverty, support innovation, and spur economic growth. But at the same time, the educational process can, and does, also serve to disempower people, further marginalize communities, and more deeply entrench existing social inequalities. This course looks at how and why this happens and what can be done about it. Using multimedia case studies from international educational development initiatives, the course critically examines these twin powers of education and considers their impacts on global educational initiatives.

SISU-106
008
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Apple, Inc. in the Global Political Economy

This course uses the history of Apple, Inc. as a case study to engage long-standing debates in political economy. First, it explores the cultural, political, economic, and other sources of technological innovation. Next, through an in-depth analysis of the iPhone, the class examines how corporations such as Apple make global production decisions and debates whether and how corporations need to be socially responsible. Also explored is how social and political awareness and activism have changed in the information age.

SISU-106
011
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Identities & Intersections:Exploring Race, Ethnicity, Gender

This course explores the complex and dynamic configuration of identity with respect to the social constructions of race, ethnicity, and gender within a historical, theoretical, and practice oriented framework. A racial, ethnic, or gendered understanding in which one is in relation to others is neither exhaustive nor inherently correct, as no one descriptor captures the essence of one's identity. Regardless of how individuals manage their identities, each has a restrictive scope, which creates opportunities for misunderstandings, stereotypes, and conflict. Students use a variety of resources, such as case studies, class discussions, a group project, and analytic short essays to develop their analytic skills. Guest speakers and attending a dramatic performance add to the breadth of the course experience.

SISU-106
013
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Identity Politics in Multiracial Societies: U.S. & Malaysia

This course examines the impact of ethnicity, religion, and identity politics on the political, economic, and social development of multicultural societies, with special focus on Malaysia and America. The theoretical inquiry on different and multi-layered "forms of belonging" focuses on structures and agents, institutions, and processes--political, economic, religious, and cultural--that are fundamental to the shaping and re-shaping of identity and culture at the individual, family, communal, national, and global levels. Key determinants of contemporary Malaysian and American identity formation examined include citizenship and nationhood, family and community, ethnicity and race, religion, class, gender, and migration, as well as the impact of the market and mass consumption in a globalizing and interdependent world. Apart from scholarly texts, films/videos, fiction, novels and graphic novels are used to further illuminate the manner in which political, economic, socio-cultural, and religious changes have impacted on the process of identity formation and inter-ethnic cultural construction at the different levels of analysis used in the investigative framework.

SISU-106
015
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

King, Obama, and the Politics of the Nobel Peace Prize

This course examines and compares the international politics of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Barack Obama and the significance of their both winning the Nobel Peace Prize. The course discusses the changing criteria used to determine who wins the prize; the similarities and differences in King and Obama's view of international relations; the reaction to their winning the prize by people in the United States and globally; and the intersection of race and international relations then and now.

SISU-106
006
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Civilizations and World Order

This course embarks on a sweeping historical journey to seek answers to a fundamental question about world order: do civilizations normally clash with each other or learn from each other? They may do both, but which has been more important in shaping human history and world order? A number of related questions are addressed, including if civilizations are the wellspring of ideas and innovation, is it mainly a matter of "the West" leading the way and teaching "the Rest" or also the other way around, and can the spread of civilization and ideas be peaceful, or does it require coercion and conquest. Finally, are we really doomed to live in a world in which the clash of civilizations shapes the world order?

SISU-106
002
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Classical Quest for Justice

Through a careful study of works by ancient Greek authors, this course considers fundamental questions of political theory, including what is justice, what do human beings owe to one another at home and on the global stage, how conceptions of justice are shaped by political circumstances, can justice be fostered in better or worse ways, and what motivates just action. The course begins by considering a classic cycle of vengeance as explored by Aeschylus in the Oresteia, where ancient Athens attempted to codify a new kind of domestic justice based on equality and the rule of law; then considers justice in an international setting through a study of Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War; and concludes with a study of Plato's masterpiece, The Republic, where Socrates leads his interlocutors, as well as his readers, through a comprehensive inquiry into the meaning and value of justice as a human virtue.

SISU-106
014
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Building a Post-Carbon World

It is essential, for a host of pressing reasons, that human societies be weaned from fossil fuels like oil and coal. The need is clear, but the path less so. This course will look at the roles played by fossil fuels in the constitution of key global environmental and economic challenges. It will then look at different visions for a post-carbon world and consider the politics of such a largescale transition. Along the way, students will work to understand what drives environmental harm and economic unrest, to become familiar with the core mechanisms of global environmental governance, and to unpack the essential features of effective environmental action.

SISU-106
016
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Bean to Brew: International Myths, Methods & Power of Coffee

This course is an exploration of one of the most popular beverages in the world--coffee. A tool of diplomats, workers, and students, coffee has been a staple underlying international discourse from halls of the Ottoman Empire to the coffee houses that became the first stock exchanges in Amsterdam, to the wood-paneled refuge of Starbucks. The course examines the life-cycle of coffee from the bean that is picked to the brewed cup, looking at the human rights, international law, trade, social, and economic impacts of one of the most ubiquitous commodities in the world.

SISU-106
017
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Environmental Ethics

This course focuses on how one can live most deeply and responsibly in the face of global environmental dangers, with the aim to understand the meaning of the "good life" at this historical moment of environmental intensification. Students read philosophically oriented and literary texts, and draw on their own experiences of place, memory, writing, and loss to develop ways of knowing and engaging in environmental politics.

SISU-106
018
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Environment and the Imagination

This course uses fiction, literary nonfiction, and film, as well as scholarly articles for background, to introduce the global politics of the environment. Organized around the four core concepts of past, future, south, and north, the class explores the environment across time and space, with particular attention to the role of empathy in how the challenges of environmental degradation and governance are understood. Open only to SIS students.

SISU-106
013
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

Globalization 3.0

This course considers the three periods of intense globalization which touched the new and the old worlds. Students examine how and why the first two ended badly for Europe, East Asia, and Latin America, and discuss scenarios for the evolution of the current globalization. Open only to SIS students.

SISU-106
018
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

The Struggle for Political Change in the Middle East

This course focuses on the prospects for political change in the Middle East in light of both the stunning protest movements of 2011 and the considerable obstacles to achieving their aspirations for political change which have emerged since. The course begins with an overview of the various aspects of the initial mobilizations including the primary grievances, the role of youth and women, the role of social media, etc. It then considers the gains, success stories, and ongoing promise of the era of protest and change in the Middle East as well as the many subsequent setbacks and formidable challenges including the turn to violence, the role of foreign powers, Islamist-secular divides, and enduring authoritarian structures. Students examine the unique political context of and differing post-uprising paths taken in Egypt, Tunisia, Bahrain, Libya, Syria, Yemen, and Iran. Throughout the course, they critically examine each county in order to gain better insight into current predicaments and prospects for long-term political change in each case individually and the region as a whole.

SISU-106
006
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

First Year Seminar (3)

The Rise of the African State

This course examines questions such as where do states come from; how do the contemporary and historical states of Africa differ from similar structures in other parts of the world and in other times throughout human history; and what can be learned about state-building and state-development from studying Africa. Lastly, to what extent can the successes and failures of contemporary African states be traced to the relations that underpinned their pre-colonial incarnations?