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INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-324
Topics in Political Economy of Latin America (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics focusing on political economy of Latin America. May be taken A-F only. Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-220.

SISU-324
001
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Political Economy of Latin America (3)

Political Economy of Mexico

Mexico, a crucial ally and neighbor of the United States, has had an uneven economic and political trajectory in its recent history. It accomplished fast economic growth with stability between 1930 and 1970, only to fall to reckless fiscal and monetary policies and in 1982 initiate the debt crisis era in Latin America. Since then, its economy has performed with mediocrity, despite reforms to restore growth. Politically, Mexico developed a unique system of governance with monopoly of power in one political party, only to become a full democracy at the start of the millennium. Deplorably, the new democratic system was unable to consolidate a solid agenda of political and economic reforms to assure its transformation into a developed country. This course explores the reasons for Mexico's standstill, its future challenges and possibilities, the implications for the welfare of its people, and for the United States as the recipient of millions of its citizens who cannot find work at home.

SISU-324
001
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Political Economy of Latin America (3)

Breakfast in the Americas

This course applies an interdisciplinary approach to examine the political, economic, cultural, environmental, and social historical issues surrounding the commodities we commonly put on our breakfast table: coffee, sugar, bananas. By looking at the lives of people who produce the commodities, own the companies, and consume the products, the course considers how consumer practices affect the lives of those who produce these commodities, and the environment in which they are produced.