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INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-370
Topics in Justice, Ethics, and Human Rights (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including ethics in international affairs, human rights and culture, human rights and the media, and political violence. May be taken A-F only. Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-270.

SISU-370
001
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Justice, Ethics, and Human Rights (3)

After War: Rebuilding Shattered States

What happens when war ends? How can broken or newly established states make the transition from conflict to stability? The end of war may well be described as the 'dangerous hour' as a weak state needs to address the underlying causes of the conflict such as systemic economic inequities, highly fragmented political, sociocultural networks, porous borders, and the presence of different types of criminal networks. Simultaneously, it has to establish the rule of law, disarm combatants, and respond to its obligations to international agreements. This course exposes students to some of the pertinent economic, political, legal, and ethical challenges and opportunities that face nation-states emerging from conflict. Using case studies, it critically examines some of the techniques used by both international intermediaries and local stakeholders to address issues of economic and political governance, security reform, effective human rights regimes, and post-conflict justice.

SISU-370
002
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Justice, Ethics, and Human Rights (3)

Perspectives on Ethics and Power

Every day, everywhere, people form judgments about actions: the actions of ourselves and others, and of corporations, governments, and international organizations. While we care passionately about the questions was that just; was it fair; was it necessary?, our answers are often inconclusive. In this course students learn to think critically and systematically about ethics. The field of ethics is interested in the norms that govern collective life, and in the question of what human beings owe to one another. Serious ethical judgment, however, involves more than mere appeal to convention, authority, or opinion; instead, it requires articulation of coherent perspectives on right action, careful consideration of alternative views, and critical reflection on the limits of human judgment. A variety of established theories of ethics such as Realism, Utilitarianism, Deontology, Virtue Ethics, and Postmodern Ethics are studied and students work to put them in conversation with each other through the use of case studies. A persistent underlying question is whether it is possible, and important, to define a universal ethics, or whether morality can and should only be shaped and defined locally.

SISU-370
003
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Justice, Ethics, and Human Rights (3)

Free Speech: Human Rights and Human Security

With the advent of online tools of all kinds, the right of freedom of expression is being put to vigorous use around the world, in the best and worst ways. In China, netizens meet on a bootleg version of Twitter and on Web forums, racing government censors. Terrorists proudly circulate videos of atrocities. In Kenya, hate speech was broadcast via SMS blasts, leading to mass killings, but at the same time, Kenyans were using SMS to report and contain violence. In the United States, one member of Congress received faxed images of nooses, and another was threatened with death on YouTube, while female students' daily movements are tracked online by their classmates, along with scenarios for raping them. This interdisciplinary course examines how speech contributes to democracy as well as to hatred and atrocities, studying international law and policy related to freedom of expression, together with cases including those above and the knotty questions they pose, such as how to let free speech flourish while inhibiting hate, terrorism, and genocide.