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Office of the Registrar

Schedule of Classes Search Results


LIT-099
Maintain Matriculation
OPEN
001
00.00
Books
LIT-107 FA1
Creative Writing Across Genres
WAIT-2
001
03.00
Voris,L
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
CLOSED
002
03.00
Switalski,M
Books
TF
08:10AM
09:25AM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
WAIT-5
003
03.00
Young,M
Books
MTH
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-121 FA1
Rethinking Literature
WAIT-2
001
Intimacy in American Lit
03.00
Noble,M
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Intimacy in American Literature (3) Explores the meaning and value of intimacy in American literature and addresses the role of sexuality, conversation, empathy, and understanding, as well as the influence of history, ethnicity, and gender. Authors include Dickinson, Whitman, Howells, Stoddard, Chesnutt, James, Wharton, Chopin, Baldwin, Larson, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Morrison, Updike, Eugenides, Roth, Salinger, Alvarez, Diaz, Holleran, Waller, and Sebold.
WAIT-2
002
Angelheaded Hipsters & Absurd
03.00
Voris,L
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Angelheaded Hipsters and the Absurd (3) This course surveys the work of the Beats and other experimental writers of the 50s and 60s including, Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Diane di Prima, Amiri Baraka and Frank O'Hara, within the postwar context of anti-Communism, consumerism, homophobia, sexism and racism. The course explores uses of the absurd in experimental writing as a response to the absurdity of the suburb, "Leave it to Beaver" norms, the Communist menace and McCarthyism, among other political and cultural trends. The course considers how jazz, drugs, sex and the visionary quest were influences on these literary movements.
WAIT-1
003
Trauma and Memory
03.00
Berry,A
Books
MTH
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Trauma and Memory (3) The relationship between trauma and literature is a paradoxical one; most recent understandings of trauma suggest one of its defining characteristics is its resistance to adequate representation, i.e. traumatic events are too horrific to tell. At the same time, writers often attempt to reconstruct traumatic events in novels. This course explores and studies this paradox and applies various interpretive strategies in an attempt to understand the effects of trauma in literature and the process of writing about traumatic experiences. Required texts include: Art Spiegelman's Maus, Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, and Larry Heinemann's Paco's Story.
WAIT-1
004
Boundary Crossings
03.00
Rubenstein,R
Books
MTH
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Boundary Crossings (3) This course expands students' literary and cultural understanding through consideration of literary texts written by a range of both western and non-western writers. Students situate works of the creative imagination in their appropriate social and historical contexts and develop critical competence in understanding the defining features of different literary genres. Through the course theme of boundary-crossing-whether cultural, geographic, or fantastic-students re-think realistic modes of writing and explore texts that pivot on unrealistic/fantastic elements. The course also includes developing or increasing competence in analyzing formal elements of literary texts through close reading and competence in written expression through informal and formal writing assignments. Readings include Life of Pi, Yann Martel; We are All Completely Beside Ourselves, Karen Joy Fowler; and How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, Mohsin Hamid; along with several other novels, a play, and selected short fiction.
WAIT-1
005
Exile Literature
03.00
Beaulieu,S
Books
MTH
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Exile Literature (3) This course surveys literary representations of exile, the banished and displaced figures that populate human history from Classical Greece through the modern era. The course analyzes the impact of exile on individuals, the societies they find themselves in, and the significance of place. Authors studied include Ovid, Dante, Nabokov, Conrad, and Kincaid.
CANCELLED
006
Theater and Censorship
03.00
Books
MTH
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
Theater and Censorship (3) From Homer's Iliad to Hollywood movies this course explores the reception of the myth of Helen of Troy from antiquity until today. As the most beautiful Greek woman, Helen of Troy is a fascinating female figure in Greek mythology. Characterized by contradictions and ambivalences, Helen's biography has a peculiar plasticity, which makes it a wonderful material for reworking and re-cycling over the centuries. Recently termed "goddess, princess, whore" by a critic, is Helen responsible for the Trojan war, or is she an innocent victim of a male conflict? Students examine how artists have tried to answer this debate--without ever solving it--through a wide range of artistic media: poetry (Homer, Virgil, Goethe, Wilde, Walcott), theater (Euripides, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Giraudoux), opera, fine arts, photography, and cinema.
WAIT-1
007
Helen of Troy
03.00
Noel,A
Books
MTH
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Helen of Troy: From Homer's Iliad to Hollywood Movies (3) Explores the reception of the myth of Helen of Troy from antiquity until today. As the most beautiful Greek woman, Helen of Troy is a fascinating female figure in Greek mythology. Characterized by contradictions and ambivalences, Helen's biography has a peculiar plasticity, which makes it a wonderful material for reworking and re-cycling over the centuries. Recently termed "goddess, princess, whore" by a critic, is Helen responsible for the Trojan war, or is she an innocent victim of a male conflict? Students examine how artists have tried to answer this debate, without ever solving it, through a wide range of artistic media: poetry (Home Virgil, Goethe, Wilde, Walcott), theater (Euripides, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Giraudoux), opera, fine arts, photography, and cinema.
LIT-125 FA2
Great Books: Western World
OPEN
001
03.00
Vishnuvajjala,U
Books
TF
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-146 FA1
Critical Appr to Cinema
OPEN
001
03.00
Kakoudaki,D
Books
TF
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
W
08:20PM
10:50PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
WAIT-1
002
03.00
Pike,D
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-211
Survey of American Lit II
OPEN
001
03.00
Noble,M
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-221
Survey of British Lit II
OPEN
001
03.00
Friedman,D
Books
MTH
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-235 FA2
African American Lit
WAIT-1
001
03.00
Leonard,K
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-240 FA2
Asian American Literature
WAIT-1
001
03.00
Wong,L
Books
TF
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-245 FA1
The Experience of Poetry
WAIT-1
001
03.00
Voris,L
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-246 FA1
Cinema & the Twentieth Century
WAIT-2
001
03.00
Dussere,E
Books
MTH
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
TH
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-250 FA3
Lit, Film & Globalization
OPEN
001
03.00
Green-Simms,L
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
M
08:20PM
10:50PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-281 FA2
Power, Discourse & Pop Culture
WAIT-8
001
03.00
Berry,A
Books
MTH
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-337
Topics in Restoration & 18th C
OPEN
001
Death Deceit & Desire Onstage
03.00
Payne,D
Books
W
02:30PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Death, Deceit, and Desire Onstage (3) Dark and witty, sexy and stylish, plays written between 1660 and 1714 look unblinkingly at the desire for power, from the bedroom to the throne room. This seminar not only introduces students to one of the most brilliant, and adult, periods of English theatre but also examines how the drama negotiated a culture increasingly riven by class, gender, and religious differences. In addition to reading representative plays by dramatists such as John Dryden, Aphra Behn, Sir George Etherege, William Congreve, George Farquhar, and Susannah Centlivre, students learn about groundbreaking innovations in late seventeenth-century stagecraft.
LIT-347
Spain/Latin America Lit & Film
OPEN
001
03.00
Books
LIT-367
Topics in World Literature
OPEN
001
Nigerian Literature
03.00
Green-Simms,L
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Nigerian Literature (3) This course examines a range of literary texts from Nigeria, Africa's most populous country, largest oil producer, and home to some of its most celebrated literary figures. Students become acquainted with both high and low forms of cultural production and gain an understanding of the political and social issues that Nigerians grapple with on a day-to-day basis. The class discusses issues such as oil wealth, corruption, religion, occultism, homosexuality, popular music, emigration, and piracy. There is also focus on the mega-city of Lagos, which is rapidly becoming one of the world's preeminent fictionalized cities.
LIT-400
Creative Writing: Fiction
Prerequisite: LIT-107.
WAIT-3
001
03.00
Perkins-Valdez,D
Books
W
11:20AM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-401
Creative Writing: Poetry
Prerequisite: LIT-107.
WAIT-7
001
03.00
Keplinger,D
Books
T
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-434
Adv St Medieval/Early Mod Lit
OPEN
001
Violence and the Sacred
03.00
Stone,J
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Violence and the Sacred (3) Every norm presupposes the repression and containment of violence; norms excite violent eruptions in turn. Festivity is unthinkable without sacrifice. Putting early modern English literature and culture in the context of the continental European Renaissance and the Reformation, this course traces the oscillation from courtesy, romance, and civility to violence, satire, and desecration. Meets with LIT-634 001.
(Meets with LIT 634 001)
LIT-440
Adv Std in 19th Century Lit
OPEN
001
Romanticism and the Emotions
03.00
Sha,R
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Romanticism and the Emotions (3) Students read the key figures on emotion such as Rousseau, Adam Smith, and Goethe, along with Blake, Byron, Mary Robinson, Charlotte Smith, and the Shelleys, as well as major theorists such as Rei Terada, Lauren Berlant, and Ruth Leys, to discover why the emotions acquired such salience from 1750 to 1850, and why the works of these writers are oft cited today within such fields as neuroscience and economics. Meets with LIT-640 001.
(Meets with LIT 640 001)
LIT-443
Adv Std in 20th Century Lit
CLOSED
001
Directions in Modern Fiction
03.00
Rubenstein,R
Books
MTH
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Directions in Modern Fiction (3) The modern novel emerged between 1910-1930 in response to upheavals in the external world that catalyzed significant aesthetic experiments. This course focuses on major Modernist writers who pioneered transformations of narrative structure and literary language. Students read novels by Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, and Kafka as well as fiction by later twentieth century writers including Garc¿a M¿rquez, Calvino, and Morrison, who are indebted to their Modernist predecessors. Meets with LIT-643 001.
(Meets with LIT 643 001)
LIT-446
Advanced Studies in Film
CANCELLED
001
Desire in World Cinema
03.00
Wong,L
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
T
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
Desire in World Cinema (3) This course investigates the theme of desire in world cinema and media that range from Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and Asia. This course discusses issues including the negotiation of colonial/ anti-colonial passions in Third Cinema, the popularization of queer desires in diasporic martial arts/ kungfu films, the restructuring of intimacy and globality in Bollywood productions, and the navigation of sexual/body politics through contemporary cyber networks. Representations of desire are approached as deeply historical projects, projects that provide means to trace developments in discourses on identity, collectivity, labor, technology, and political agency. Meets with LIT-646 001.
(Meets with LIT 646 001)
OPEN
002
Melodrama
03.00
Kakoudaki,D
Books
TF
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Melodrama (3) This course develops a historical and theoretical framework for studying melodrama. Starting from the evolution of early film melodrama and its relationship to popular theater, students trace the generic conventions of the mode in a diverse range of texts, from classical Hollywood formulas and "women's movies," to contemporary action and disaster films. Meets with LIT-646 002.
(Meets with LIT 646 002)
OPEN
003
Desire in World Cinema
03.00
Wong,L
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Desire in World Cinema (3) This course investigates the theme of desire in world cinema and media that range from Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and Asia. This course discusses issues including the negotiation of colonial/ anti-colonial passions in Third Cinema, the popularization of queer desires in diasporic martial arts/ kungfu films, the restructuring of intimacy and globality in Bollywood productions, and the navigation of sexual/body politics through contemporary cyber networks. Representations of desire are approached as deeply historical projects, projects that provide means to trace developments in discourses on identity, collectivity, labor, technology, and political agency. Meets with LIT-646 003.
(Meets with LIT 646 003)
LIT-480
Senior Project in Literature
Prerequisite: LIT-479.
OPEN
001
03.00
Sha,R
Books
T
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
OPEN
002
03.00
Keplinger,D
Books
TH
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-481
Advanced Studies in Culture
OPEN
001
Black to the Future
03.00
Leonard,K
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Black to the Future (3) From Sun-Ra to Janelle Monet, Octavia Butler to Percival Everett, African American artists and intellectuals have long been pushing at the expected boundaries of blackness in search of intellectual and social freedom. This course explores how some of the most adventurous of those artists from the late 1960s to the present try to imagine the future of blackness as a way to imagine new social and political possibilities. The focus is on the sci-fi stylings of Afro-Futurism in literary and visual arts, the hyperrealism and satire of Scandal and Blackish, and artistic responses to Black Lives Matter. Through this artistry, the class speculates on what blackness can and should mean in the twenty-first century and beyond. Meets with LIT-681 001 and AMST-496 001.
(Meets with LIT 681 001 AMST 496 001)
OPEN
002
Sexuality in Victorian Lit
03.00
Friedman,D
Books
MTH
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Sexuality in Victorian Literature (3) The Victorians have a reputation for being prudish and repressed, but the nineteenth century was pivotal for the development of modern understandings of sexuality. This course examines the inverts, perverts, imperialists, and new women who populated the Victorian imagination to understand how literature contributed to the creation of new identity categories. Meets with LIT-681 002.
(Meets with LIT 681 002 WGSS 496 005 WGSS 696 005)
LIT-491
Practical Internship in Lit
Permission: instructor and department chair.
CLOSED
001
01.00-06.00
Kakoudaki,D
Books
LIT-496
Selected Topics:Non-Recurring
CLOSED
001
Literary Jour/Creative Nonfict
03.00
Snyder,R
Books
T
11:20AM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Literary Journalism and Creative Nonfiction (3) This course prepares students to write long-form journalism using the principles of deep reportage and immersion journalism in conjunction with the craft of narration. Elements of fiction writing such as character development, plot, and voice are examined to determine how they are utilized by long-form journalists. The course focuses on how personal narratives are structured within a larger framework of issue-oriented reporting, paying particular attention to the architecture of global issues told through an individual voice. Students explore issues of immigration, globalization, human rights, and environmentalism, among others, and study the work of noteworthy stylists such as John McPhee, Lauren Slater, Andre Aciman, Rachel Aviv, and Elif Batuman, among others. Meets with COMM-420 008 COMM-620 011.
(Meets with COMM 420 008 COMM 620 011)
LIT-634
Adv St Medieval/Early Mod Lit
OPEN
001
Violence and the Sacred
03.00
Stone,J
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Violence and the Sacred (3) Every norm presupposes the repression and containment of violence; norms excite violent eruptions in turn. Festivity is unthinkable without sacrifice. Putting early modern English literature and culture in the context of the continental European Renaissance and the Reformation, this course traces the oscillation from courtesy, romance, and civility to violence, satire, and desecration. Meets with LIT-434 001.
(Meets with LIT 434 001)
LIT-640
Adv Std in 19th Century Lit
OPEN
001
Romanticism and the Emotions
03.00
Sha,R
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Romanticism and the Emotions (3) Students read the key figures on emotion such as Rousseau, Adam Smith, and Goethe, along with Blake, Byron, Mary Robinson, Charlotte Smith, and the Shelleys, as well as major theorists such as Rei Terada, Lauren Berlant, and Ruth Leys, to discover why the emotions acquired such salience from 1750 to 1850, and why the works of these writers are oft cited today within such fields as neuroscience and economics. Meets with LIT-440 001.
(Meets with LIT 440 001)
LIT-643
Adv Std in 20th Century Lit
CLOSED
001
Directions in Modern Fiction
03.00
Rubenstein,R
Books
MTH
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Directions in Modern Fiction (3) The modern novel emerged between 1910-1930 in response to upheavals in the external world that catalyzed significant aesthetic experiments. This course focuses on major Modernist writers who pioneered transformations of narrative structure and literary language. Students read novels by Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, and Kafka as well as fiction by later twentieth century writers including Garc¿a M¿rquez, Calvino, and Morrison, who are indebted to their Modernist predecessors. Meets with LIT-443 001.
(Meets with LIT 443 001)
LIT-646
Advanced Studies in Film
CANCELLED
001
Desire in World Cinema
03.00
Wong,L
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
T
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
Desire in World Cinema (3) This course investigates the theme of desire in world cinema and media that range from Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and Asia. This course discusses issues including the negotiation of colonial/ anti-colonial passions in Third Cinema, the popularization of queer desires in diasporic martial arts/ kungfu films, the restructuring of intimacy and globality in Bollywood productions, and the navigation of sexual/body politics through contemporary cyber networks. Representations of desire are approached as deeply historical projects, projects that provide means to trace developments in discourses on identity, collectivity, labor, technology, and political agency. Meets with LIT-446 001.
(Meets with LIT 446 001)
OPEN
002
Melodrama
03.00
Kakoudaki,D
Books
TF
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Melodrama (3) This course develops a historical and theoretical framework for studying melodrama. Starting from the evolution of early film melodrama and its relationship to popular theater, students trace the generic conventions of the mode in a diverse range of texts, from classical Hollywood formulas and "women's movies," to contemporary action and disaster films. Meets with LIT-446 002.
(Meets with LIT 446 002)
OPEN
003
Desire in World Cinema
03.00
Wong,L
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Desire in World Cinema (3) This course investigates the theme of desire in world cinema and media that range from Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and Asia. This course discusses issues including the negotiation of colonial/ anti-colonial passions in Third Cinema, the popularization of queer desires in diasporic martial arts/ kungfu films, the restructuring of intimacy and globality in Bollywood productions, and the navigation of sexual/body politics through contemporary cyber networks. Representations of desire are approached as deeply historical projects, projects that provide means to trace developments in discourses on identity, collectivity, labor, technology, and political agency. Meets with LIT-446 003.
(Meets with LIT 446 003)
LIT-650
Theories and Methodologies
Restriction: Literature (MA).
OPEN
001
03.00
Dussere,E
Books
M
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-652
Readings in Genre: Drama
Restriction: Literature (MA).
CANCELLED
001
03.00
Payne,D
Books
TH
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
OPEN
002
03.00
Payne,D
Books
T
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-681
Advanced Studies in Culture
OPEN
001
Black to the Future
03.00
Leonard,K
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Black to the Future (3) From Sun-Ra to Janelle Monet, Octavia Butler to Percival Everett, African American artists and intellectuals have long been pushing at the expected boundaries of blackness in search of intellectual and social freedom. This course explores how some of the most adventurous of those artists from the late 1960s to the present try to imagine the future of blackness as a way to imagine new social and political possibilities. The focus is on the sci-fi stylings of Afro-Futurism in literary and visual arts, the hyperrealism and satire of Scandal and Blackish, and artistic responses to Black Lives Matter. Through this artistry, the class speculates on what blackness can and should mean in the twenty-first century and beyond. Meets with LIT-481 001 and AMST-496 001.
(Meets with LIT 481 001 AMST 496 001)
OPEN
002
Sexuality in Victorian Lit
03.00
Friedman,D
Books
MTH
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Sexuality in Victorian Literature (3) The Victorians have a reputation for being prudish and repressed, but the nineteenth century was pivotal for the development of modern understandings of sexuality. This course examines the inverts, perverts, imperialists, and new women who populated the Victorian imagination to understand how literature contributed to the creation of new identity categories. Meets with LIT-481 002.
(Meets with LIT 481 002 WGSS 496 005 WGSS 696 005)
LIT-690
Ind Study Project in Lit
Permission: instructor and department chair.
CLOSED
001
Crafting a Memoir
01.00-06.00
McCann,R
Books
CLOSED
002
Description & Time in Fiction
01.00-06.00
Perkins-Valdez,D
Books
CLOSED
003
Poetry of Witness Workshop
01.00-06.00
Keplinger,D
Books
LIT-691
Graduate Internship
Permission: instructor and department chair.
OPEN
001
01.00-06.00
Dargan,K
Books
OPEN
002
01.00-06.00
Keplinger,D
Books
LIT-700
Advanced Fiction Workshop
Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).
CANCELLED
001
03.00
Perkins-Valdez,D
Books
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
OPEN
003
03.00
Perkins-Valdez,D
Books
TH
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
OPEN
004
03.00
Young,M
Books
M
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-701
Advanced Poetry Workshop
Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).
CLOSED
001
03.00
Dargan,K
Books
TH
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-704
Adv Creative Nonfiction Wrkshp
Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).
OPEN
001
03.00
McCann,R
Books
T
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-710
The Art of Literary Journalism
Prerequisite: at least 18 credits hours. Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).
OPEN
001
03.00
Snyder,R
Books
M
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
LIT-731
Teaching of Writing Practicum
Prerequisite: LIT-730.
OPEN
002
03.00
Hyman,J
Books
LIT-733
Special Topics in Literature
OPEN
001
Trauma and Its Discourses
03.00
Berry,A
Books
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Trauma and its Discourses (3) Trauma studies is a growing area of interest in the humanities, including the study of writing and representation. The study of the discourse of trauma presents various generative tensions: between the everyday and the extreme; between individual and collective identities; between history and the present; between experience and representation; between facts and memory; and between the clinical and the cultural. This course studies fiction and non-fiction texts that allow asking what it means to use the discourse(s) of trauma; why do texts represent events as traumatic, as ruptures, breaks, and other deviations from the normal; and, what then is the normal? Texts studied include Cormac McCarthy's apocalyptic novel The Road, Dorothy Allison's account of her abuse during childhood Two or Three Things I know for Sure, and Eric Fair's book about his experience as an interrogator in Iraq, Consequence: A Memoir.
(Meets with LIT 733 002)
CLOSED
002
Trauma and Its Discourses
03.00
Berry,A
Books
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/17/17
05/09/17
Trauma and its Discourses (3) Trauma studies is a growing area of interest in the humanities, including the study of writing and representation. The study of the discourse of trauma presents various generative tensions: between the everyday and the extreme; between individual and collective identities; between history and the present; between experience and representation; between facts and memory; and between the clinical and the cultural. This course studies fiction and non-fiction texts that allow asking what it means to use the discourse(s) of trauma; why do texts represent events as traumatic, as ruptures, breaks, and other deviations from the normal; and, what then is the normal? Texts studied include Cormac McCarthy's apocalyptic novel The Road, Dorothy Allison's account of her abuse during childhood Two or Three Things I know for Sure, and Eric Fair's book about his experience as an interrogator in Iraq, Consequence: A Memoir. Restriction: Literature (MA).
(Meets with LIT 733 001)
LIT-793
Directed Research in Lit
Permission: instructor.
OPEN
001
03.00
Books
OPEN
002
03.00
Books
OPEN
003
03.00
Books
LIT-797
Master's Thesis Seminar
May be taken SP/UP only.
OPEN
001
01.00-06.00
Dargan,K
Books
OPEN
002
01.00-06.00
Dussere,E
Books
CLOSED
003
01.00-06.00
Keplinger,D
Books