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Schedule of Classes Search Results


LIT-099
Maintain Matriculation
OPEN
001
00.00
Books
LIT-107 FA1
Creative Writing Across Genres
OPEN
001
03.00
Bernstein,A
Books
W
11:20AM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
CLOSED
002
03.00
Dargan,K
Books
TF
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
WAIT-1
003
03.00
Voris,L
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
CLOSED
004
03.00
Park,P
Books
MTH
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-121 FA1
Rethinking Literature
WAIT-1
001
Literary Hauntings
03.00
Rubenstein,R
Books
MTH
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Literary Hauntings (3) Apparitions have long been a staple of fiction, perhaps since early storytellers gathered around the fire to swap spine-tingling tales. What are the sources of readers' perennial attraction to spectral beings, haunted houses, paranormal events, and things that go bump in the night? Students read a diverse selection of short stories and novels by classical and contemporary authors of ghost stories and other literary hauntings, ranging from Edgar Allen Poe, W. R. James, Henry James, and Edith Wharton to Shirley Jackson, R. K. Narayan, Susan Hill, and Toni Morrison. Students consider the elements that make such uncanny tales satisfying and deepen their understanding of the forms and variations of literary texts written to produce both dread and pleasure.
OPEN
002
We Are All Zombies
03.00
Sha,R
Books
MTH
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
We Are All Zombies (3) What is consciousness, and how automatic is it? If neuroscience underscores the automatic nature of many of our thoughts--some studies suggest that two thirds of our thoughts wander out of our own control--how do we defend humanity from being reduced to zombies, and how must we adjust our concepts of agency and personhood in the wake of our irrefutable automaticity? This interdisciplinary course turns to philosophy, literature, popular culture, and neuroscience to ask if we can be more than zombies, and what consciousness and agency are if we don't always control them. Texts include The Walking Dead, philosophy by David Chalmers, and neuroscience by V. S. Ramachandran, David Eagleman, and Antonio Damasio. Literary and cinematic models of the human serve as a contrast, and the class reads William Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience, Tom McCarthy's novel Remainder, and Steve McQueen's Shame to frame alternative notions of how automaticity and personhood can be synthesized.
OPEN
003
Desire and Identity
03.00
Brideoake,F
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Desire and Identity (3) Who, how, and what do we want? How are gender and sexuality distinct and interrelated? How are desires and identities shaped by race, gender, class, embodiment, and nationality? This course considers these questions and more through literary, cultural, and critical texts drawn from the Renaissance to the present day. It serves as an introduction to both literary analysis and the study of gender, sexuality, and queer theory.
WAIT-5
004
Thought Crimes
03.00
Smith,K
Books
W
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Instructional Method: Hybrid. Thought Crimes (3) This course examines what is a thought crime and the origins of the idea of mental transgression and its place in the modern world. Law, philosophy, and neuroscience offer tools for analyzing literature and film from diverse periods.
LIT-125 FA2
Great Books: Western World
OPEN
001
03.00
Sherman,A
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-146 FA1
Critical Appr to Cinema
OPEN
001
03.00
Fileri,P
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
TH
08:20PM
10:50PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
CLOSED
002
03.00
Middents,J
Books
MTH
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
W
08:20PM
10:50PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
WAIT-1
005
03.00
Ratekin,T
Books
MTH
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
W
08:20PM
10:50PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-210
Survey of American Lit I
OPEN
001
03.00
Noble,M
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-215 FA1
Writers in Print/Person
OPEN
001
03.00
Beasley,S
Books
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-220
Survey of British Lit I
OPEN
001
03.00
Payne,D
Books
MTH
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-225 FA1
African Literature
WAIT-3
001
03.00
Green-Simms,L
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-232 FA1
Shakespeare
WAIT-1
001
Shakespeare's First Decade
03.00
Sherman,A
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Shakespeare's First Decade: Greatest Hits (3) How did Shakespeare become a giant of literature? This course surveys the first half of Shakespeare's career, showing him as a developing artist, learning the tricks of the trade, attuned to political and religious happenings, and responding to the vibrant London theater scene where he soon made his mark. It covers a sampling of comedies, tragedies, and histories. Students take a field trip to the Folger Shakespeare Library and attend a live performance.
LIT-245 FA1
The Experience of Poetry
OPEN
001
03.00
Voris,L
Books
TF
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
CLOSED
002
03.00
Voris,L
Books
TF
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-250 FA3
Lit, Film & Globalization
WAIT-1
001
03.00
Green-Simms,L
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
M
08:20PM
10:50PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-252
Survey of Literary Theory
OPEN
001
03.00
Berry,A
Books
MTH
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-265 FA2
Lit & Soc in Vict Engl
CLOSED
001
03.00
Friedman,D
Books
MTH
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-267 FA3
Literatures of Global South
WAIT-1
001
03.00
Wong,L
Books
TF
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-281 FA2
Power, Discourse & Pop Culture
WAIT-1
001
03.00
Berry,A
Books
MTH
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
WAIT-2
002
03.00
Berry,A
Books
MTH
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-311
Literature Colloquium
OPEN
001
01.00
Noble,M
Books
LIT-334
Topics in Renaissance Lit
OPEN
001
Three Rs: Royals, Relig & Rev
03.00
Sherman,A
Books
W
11:20AM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
The Three Rs: Royals, Religion and Revolution (3) Religious devotion, class conflict, and political upheaval marked seventeenth-century Britain, sparking some of the greatest writing England has ever known. Students read a sampling of poems, plays, and novellas that take us from disintegrating kingdoms and religious soul-searching to early science fiction, passing through political propaganda, proto-feminist fantasies, metaphysical musings, and much more. This course explores the reciprocal dynamics of literature and revolution: how political revolution affects literary production, and how literature in turn shapes political imaginings. William Shakespeare, John Donne, Ben Jonson, Aemilia Lanyer, Francis Bacon, Margaret Cavendish, Andrew Marvell, and John Milton, among others, are the guides through this tumultuous period. Students take a field trip to the Folger Shakespeare Library to examine early editions of some of the texts.
LIT-337
Topics in Restoration & 18th C
OPEN
001
The 18th Century Woman Writer
03.00
Brideoake,F
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
The Eighteenth-Century Woman Writer (3) Virginia Woolf famously praised "the elements of Jane Austen's greatness," identifying her as the first female writer in English to have transformed her sex into a strength, rather than a weakness, in the creation of fiction. Austen was, however, only one in a succession of eighteenth-century female authors in a period in which both the reading and writing of novels were understood as feminine pursuits. This course explores this often overlooked tradition; its transformations of novelistic form, narration, and plot; and its explorations of themes including sexuality, sensibility, marriage, education, motherhood, duty, and autonomy. Readings include a range of authors celebrated in their day and variously remembered, and largely forgotten, now, including Eliza Haywood, Sarah Scott, Mary Hays, Elizabeth Inchbald, Ann Radcliffe, Frances Burney, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Jane Austen.
LIT-346
Topics in Film
CANCELLED
001
David Lynch/Cinematic Sublime
03.00
Ratekin,T
Books
MTH
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
W
08:20PM
10:50PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
David Lynch and the Cinematic Sublime (3) This course looks at the innovative work of director David Lynch through the particular lens of the sublime, an aesthetic concept defined primarily as the feeling of terror and awe that arises when reason's limits are reached. Lynch's films, such as Blue Velvet, The Elephant Man, and Mulholland Drive, are perplexing and captivating because they suggest that the image of control that cultural conventions provide actually separates us from larger and more meaningful experiences. He denaturalizes the everyday, usually through satire, and then uses sounds and images to evoke a transcendent or intuitive reality that we usually repress. Students consider competing theories of the sublime and the particular ways in which film is able to convey these ideas and watch Hiroshima, Mon Amour, Jaws, The Matrix, Into the Wild, Melancholia, and Life of Pi in addition to eight Lynch films.
OPEN
002
Hollywood in the Seventies
03.00
Dussere,E
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
T
08:20PM
10:50PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Hollywood in the Seventies (3) The seventies (defined broadly here as the "New Hollywood" period of 1967-80) was a transformative moment for Hollywood filmmaking. Following the end of the Hays code and the break-up of the studio system, American cinema became darker as it began to assimilate the new social movements of the sixties. Meanwhile, young, film-schooled directors introduced new kinds of film narrative and style and American film absorbed the new influences of international art cinema. This course examines some of the major films of the period, and considers the transformation of Hollywood genres and the new cultural politics of the seventies.
LIT-360
Topics in Medieval Literature
OPEN
001
Criminal Intent in Law Lit/Soc
03.00
Smith,K
Books
W
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Instructional Method: Hybrid. Criminal Intent in Law, Literature and Society (3) The concept of mens rea or criminal intent is a relatively new legal innovation, dating from the Middle Ages. By reading Augustine and Abelard as well as ancient legal codes, this course studies the origins of the creation of a moral self that was based on the mind, as opposed to observable actions. The poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer offers an important example of how writers of the period used the idea of individual intent to develop literary character and to represent human subjectivity. Medieval plays that represent the thought crimes of Satan provide a platform for thinking about intention and religious or intellectual dissent. Students examine the related problems of just intent in just war theory from its medieval origins to current conflicts, as well as how recent literary works by Junot Diaz and Alice Munro understand intention as both a problematic and a defining element of culpability and the moral self. Modern theories of intention and morality from philosophers and neuroscientists offer additional theoretical lenses for analyzing the course readings.
LIT-365
Mediterranean Literature
OPEN
001
03.00
Books
LIT-367
Topics in World Literature
OPEN
001
Love & Rev: Asian/American Lit
03.00
Wong,L
Books
TF
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Love and Revolution: Asian/American Literature (3) This course investigates how themes of love and revolution converge in twentieth and twenty-first century Asian/ American literature. Analyzing the Asia/Pacific, between Asia and America, as itself a space for cultural production, the class discusses issues including: the emergence of "free love" discourse in early twentieth-century literary movements, the restructuring of intimacy in Sinophone martial arts novels, aspirations for cross-racial solidarities in activist literature during the Cold War, and the navigation of sexual/ body politics in contemporary online fiction. As such, representations of "love" are approached as deeply historical projects, projects that provide means to trace the developments in discourses on identity, collectivity, and political agency.
LIT-379
Mediterranean Cinema
OPEN
001
03.00
Books
LIT-381
Topics in Cultural Studies
OPEN
001
Literature from the Holocaust
03.00
Strauss,L
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Literature from the Holocaust (3) This course explores the Holocaust through the prism of literature written during and after World War II. Poetry, plays, short stories, diaries, and memoirs written by both victims and observers reveal an extraordinary level of detail about individual lives touched by the tragedy. Course materials range from secret diaries created inside ghetto walls, to epic poems hidden as their authors were being deported, to post-war survivor memoirs, to short stories and novels written by those who had not yet been born during the war years. Meets with JWST-320 001.
(Meets with JWST 320 001)
LIT-400
Creative Writing: Fiction
Prerequisite: LIT-107.
WAIT-1
001
03.00
Grant,S
Books
T
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-401
Creative Writing: Poetry
Prerequisite: LIT-107.
WAIT-1
001
03.00
Dargan,K
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-403
Creative Writing: Nonfiction
Prerequisite: LIT-107.
OPEN
001
03.00
Christensen,K
Books
W
02:30PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-434
Adv St Medieval/Early Mod Lit
OPEN
001
Early Modern London
03.00
Payne,D
Books
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Early Modern London: Text, Sound, and Space (3) Between 1580 and 1700, London doubled its population, going from a modest city to a bustling, rich, cosmopolitan metropolis that gave its rivals, Paris and Amsterdam, considerable pause. This period saw enormous spatial, physical, and cultural transformation, giving birth to new forms of art, new ways of mapping movement, new modes of human interaction; new materials for building, even a new way of thinking about money and wealth. The class experiences the imaginative and material riches of this extraordinary period in English history, exploring how early modern Londoners thought about themselves in relation to the changes taking place. Readings include "city" comedies; verse satires; newsletters and ballads; maps; and letters and diaries. Musical and dance excerpts, as well as paintings and prints supplement readings. The seminar emphasizes archival research and students learn how to work in databases of primary texts, such as Early English Books Online, in order to embark on original projects. Meets with LIT-634 001.
(Meets with LIT 634 001)
LIT-443
Adv Std in 20th Century Lit
OPEN
001
Feminism and Fiction
03.00
Rubenstein,R
Books
MTH
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Feminism and Fiction (3) Students read selected literary texts written primarily by women and primarily during the past 150 years, along with philosophical, critical, and theoretical essays that mark several waves of feminism. Texts include The Book of the City of Ladies, Christine de Pizan; Jane Eyre, Bronte; A Room of One's Own and Orlando, Woolf; The Awakening, Chopin; Bread-givers, Yezierska; Wide Sargasso Sea, Rhys; Their Eyes Were Watching God, Hurston; How the Garcia Girls Lost their Accents, Alvarez; Nervous Conditions, Dangarembga; The Bloody Chamber, Carter; and classic and contemporary short stories. Meets with LIT-643 001.
(Meets with LIT 643 001)
LIT-446
Advanced Studies in Film
OPEN
001
Auteur Study: Alfonso Cuaron
03.00
Middents,J
Books
MTH
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Auteur Study: Alfonso Cuaron (3) After the production credits, most feature films feature a single card stating that the following is "a film by..." usually, the director of the film. Such is the power of the director as auteur, where we ascribe authorship of a film (which is inherently a collective project), to a single person. This method of cinematic analysis has been popular since at least the late 1950s, and not just in academia. Indeed, the concept of the auteur, and even the word itself, is consistently used by marketing strategists and the public. What is gained, or lost, by privileging (or fetishizing) the director? How does studying a director differ from studying a writer or an actor? This course examines the history of auteur study and explores different manifestations of how authorship has and can be used within cinema studies. Throughout the course, the work of the transnational director Alfonso Cuaron is used as a case study through which to examine issues of cinematic authorship. Additionally, students select a second director to do a full research project. The course includes mandatory film screenings. Meets with LIT-646 001.
(Meets with LIT 646 001)
LIT-479
Sr Sem in Lit: Value of Lit
OPEN
001
03.00
Dussere,E
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-490
Ind Study Project in Lit
Permission: instructor and department chair.
OPEN
001
Puerto Rico: Colonized Mind
01.00-06.00
Trembath,S
Books
CLOSED
002
Romanticism, Taste, and Food
01.00-06.00
Berry,A
Books
LIT-491
Practical Internship in Lit
Permission: instructor and department chair.
OPEN
001
01.00-06.00
Kakoudaki,D
Books
LIT-496
Selected Topics:Non-Recurring
OPEN
001
The Mythographer's Craft
03.00
Pathak,S
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
The Mythographer's Craft (3) Greek and Roman mythographers gave new life to older epic stories in eras when collections of classical tales were in great demand as texts for teaching and learning. This course traces the transformation of the birth of the gods, Jason's voyage with the Argonauts, and Aeneas's travels after the Trojan war to illuminate the fates of these narratives when distilled from Hesiod's Theogony, Apollonius Rhodius's Argonautica, and Vergil's Aeneid into Apollodorus's Library and Hyginus's Fabulae. As the epic tales took shape and were reshaped in Archaic and Hellenistic Greece and early imperial Rome, these metamorphosing stories resonated through theologies, rituals, politics, and societies. Appreciating the particular patterns of these narratives' shifts over time and across space by studying these movements as processes unfolding within their respective historical and religious traditions reveals what Greek and Roman myths contributed to their cultures both separately and together. Meets with LIT-696 001 RELG-486 002 RELG-686 002.
(Meets with LIT 696 001 RELG 486 002 RELG 686 002)
LIT-634
Adv St Medieval/Early Mod Lit
OPEN
001
Early Modern London
03.00
Payne,D
Books
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Early Modern London: Text, Sound, and Space (3) Between 1580 and 1700, London doubled its population, going from a modest city to a bustling, rich, cosmopolitan metropolis that gave its rivals, Paris and Amsterdam, considerable pause. This period saw enormous spatial, physical, and cultural transformation, giving birth to new forms of art, new ways of mapping movement, new modes of human interaction; new materials for building, even a new way of thinking about money and wealth. The class experiences the imaginative and material riches of this extraordinary period in English history, exploring how early modern Londoners thought about themselves in relation to the changes taking place. Readings include "city" comedies; verse satires; newsletters and ballads; maps; and letters and diaries. Musical and dance excerpts, as well as paintings and prints supplement readings. The seminar emphasizes archival research and students learn how to work in databases of primary texts, such as Early English Books Online, in order to embark on original projects. Meets with LIT-434 001.
(Meets with LIT 434 001)
LIT-643
Adv Std in 20th Century Lit
OPEN
001
Feminism and Fiction
03.00
Rubenstein,R
Books
MTH
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Feminism and Fiction (3) Students read selected literary texts written primarily by women and primarily during the past 150 years, along with philosophical, critical, and theoretical essays that mark several waves of feminism. Texts include The Book of the City of Ladies, Christine de Pizan; Jane Eyre, Bronte; A Room of One's Own and Orlando, Woolf; The Awakening, Chopin; Bread-givers, Yezierska; Wide Sargasso Sea, Rhys; Their Eyes Were Watching God, Hurston; How the Garcia Girls Lost their Accents, Alvarez; Nervous Conditions, Dangarembga; The Bloody Chamber, Carter; and classic and contemporary short stories. Meets with LIT-443 001.
(Meets with LIT 443 001)
LIT-646
Advanced Studies in Film
OPEN
001
Auteur Study: Alfonso Cuaron
03.00
Middents,J
Books
MTH
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Auteur Study: Alfonso Cuaron (3) After the production credits, most feature films feature a single card stating that the following is "a film by..." usually, the director of the film. Such is the power of the director as auteur, where we ascribe authorship of a film (which is inherently a collective project), to a single person. This method of cinematic analysis has been popular since at least the late 1950s, and not just in academia. Indeed, the concept of the auteur, and even the word itself, is consistently used by marketing strategists and the public. What is gained, or lost, by privileging (or fetishizing) the director? How does studying a director differ from studying a writer or an actor? This course examines the history of auteur study and explores different manifestations of how authorship has and can be used within cinema studies. Throughout the course, the work of the transnational director Alfonso Cuaron is used as a case study through which to examine issues of cinematic authorship. Additionally, students select a second director to do a full research project. The course includes mandatory film screenings. Meets with LIT-446 001.
(Meets with LIT 446 001)
LIT-651
Readings in Genre: Poetry
Restriction: Literature (MA).
OPEN
001
03.00
Manson,M
Books
TH
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
(Meets with LIT 651 002)
OPEN
002
03.00
Manson,M
Books
TH
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
(Meets with LIT 651 001)
LIT-690
Ind Study Project in Lit
Permission: instructor and department chair.
OPEN
001
Writing/ Reading: D.C. Poets
01.00-06.00
Young,M
Books
OPEN
002
The Long Poem in American Lit.
01.00-06.00
Keplinger,D
Books
CLOSED
003
Graduate Non-Fiction Writing
01.00-06.00
Snyder,R
Books
LIT-691
Graduate Internship
Permission: instructor and department chair.
OPEN
001
03.00
Keplinger,D
Books
LIT-696
Selected Topics:Non-Recurring
OPEN
001
The Mythographer's Craft
03.00
Pathak,S
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
The Mythographer's Craft (3) Greek and Roman mythographers gave new life to older epic stories in eras when collections of classical tales were in great demand as texts for teaching and learning. This course traces the transformation of the birth of the gods, Jason's voyage with the Argonauts, and Aeneas's travels after the Trojan war to illuminate the fates of these narratives when distilled from Hesiod's Theogony, Apollonius Rhodius's Argonautica, and Vergil's Aeneid into Apollodorus's Library and Hyginus's Fabulae. As the epic tales took shape and were reshaped in Archaic and Hellenistic Greece and early imperial Rome, these metamorphosing stories resonated through theologies, rituals, politics, and societies. Appreciating the particular patterns of these narratives' shifts over time and across space by studying these movements as processes unfolding within their respective historical and religious traditions reveals what Greek and Roman myths contributed to their cultures both separately and together. Meets with LIT-496 001 RELG-486 002 RELG-686 002.
(Meets with LIT 496 001 RELG 486 002 RELG 686 002)
LIT-700
Advanced Fiction Workshop
Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).
WAIT-1
001
03.00
Perkins-Valdez,D
Books
TH
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-701
Advanced Poetry Workshop
Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).
CLOSED
001
03.00
Keplinger,D
Books
T
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-704
Adv Creative Nonfiction Wrkshp
Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).
OPEN
001
03.00
Snyder,R
Books
T
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-705
Seminar on Translation
Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).
CLOSED
001
03.00
Keplinger,D
Books
TH
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-730
Teaching Composition
OPEN
001
03.00
Auten,J
Books
M
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
LIT-737
Seminar in 19th C. Literature
OPEN
001
Sympathy/Contact Amer Rom Lit
03.00
Noble,M
Books
T
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
08/28/17
12/16/17
Sympathy and Human Contact in American Romantic Literature (3) Many American authors of the Romantic era criticize the faades people present for misrepresenting their true feelings and thoughts. Students in this course read works by Emerson, Hawthorne, Douglass, Stowe, Dickinson and Whitman -- authors who idealized sympathy as a means of achieving genuine human contact. This course examines their varying ideas of what sympathy means and how it might promote human contact. Students also read scholarship and philosophies of human contact and sympathy.
LIT-793
Directed Research in Lit
Permission: instructor.
CLOSED
001
03.00
Pike,D
Books
OPEN
002
03.00
Payne,D
Books
CLOSED
003
03.00
Rubenstein,R
Books
CLOSED
004
03.00
Pike,D
Books
CLOSED
005
03.00
Dussere,E
Books
LIT-797
Master's Thesis Seminar
OPEN
001
01.00-06.00
Keplinger,D
Books
OPEN
002
01.00-06.00
Dargan,K
Books
OPEN
003
01.00-06.00
Rubenstein,R
Books
OPEN
004
01.00-06.00
Snyder,R
Books
CANCELLED
005
01.00-06.00
Snyder,R
Books
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
OPEN
006
01.00-06.00
Grant,S
Books