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Sarah Knight Assistant Professor School of International Service

Contact
(202) 885-1613 (Office)
SIS-School of Intl Service
SIS - 115C
Tuesdays 1:30-3:30 and Thursdays 10:30-12:30
Additional Positions at AU
Faculty Director, School of International Service Honors Program
Degrees
PhD, Government, Georgetown University; MA, Foreign Service, Georgetown University; BA, International Studies, University of Washington

Languages Spoken
English (native) and Spanish
Favorite Spot on Campus
Davenport Lounge
Book Currently Reading
The Underground Railroad, by Colson Whitehead
Bio
Dr. Sarah Cleeland Knight is Faculty Director of the SIS Honors Program and Assistant Professor at American University's School of International Service. Dr. Knight's research focuses on international political economy. She is interested in identifying the winners and losers from globalization and tracking how those groups influence foreign economic policy (trade, exchange rates, and sanctions). She also has written on the history of the Bretton Woods institutions and the global politics of the Internet and electronic commerce. Dr. Knight has received funding for her research from the Ford Foundation, DAAD/American Institute for Contemporary German Studies, and Georgetown University. Before coming to American University, she taught at Georgetown University and worked at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, the USDA’s export promotion program, and the international trade office of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce. She lives in Arlington, Virginia, with her husband, Jeff, her two daughters, Grace and Charlotte, and her golden retriever, Nala.
For the Media
To request an interview for a news story, call AU Communications at 202-885-5950 or submit a request.

Partnerships & Affiliations

  • International Studies Association
    member

  • American Political Science Association
    member

Scholarly, Creative & Professional Activities

Selected Publications

Work In Progress

"Even Today, a Thoroughly American and Gendered Discipline: Persistent Biases in Undergraduate International Relations Teaching."