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International Peace and Conflict Resolution | SIS

Recent Alumni Publications

Norman, Julie M (PhD/SIS '09) & Maia Carter Hallward (PhD/SIS '06), co-editors. Nonviolent Resistance in the Second Intifada. 2011. Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY.

This edited volume explores a range of approaches to nonviolent or popular resistance in the Second Intifada. Written by scholar-activists with diverse experiences in Israel-Palestine, the chapters in the volume provide the reader with an overview of how nonviolent resistance is conceived and practiced in a variety of settings within the occupied Palestinian territories, Israel, and internationally. The selections explore the themes of power, tactics, and the interactions between local and international activists (from Amazon.com).

This volume features several IPCR authors:

Norman, Julie M. “Introduction: Nonviolent Resistance in the Second Intifada.” P 1-12.
Seidel, Timothy (MA/IPCR ’03). “Development as Peacebuilding and Resistance: Alternative Narratives of Nonviolence in Palestine-Israel.” P 33-52.
Scruggs, Sarah (MA/IPCR 09).“Understandings of Nonviolence and Violence: Joint Palestinian and International Nonviolent Resistance.” P 69-86.
Hallward, Maia Carter. “International Law and the Case of Operation Cast Lead: “Lawfare” and the Struggle for Justice.” P 111-132.
Shapiro, Adam (PhD/SIS ABD). 2011. “'The Free Gaza Movement’ - From an Interview with Adam Shapiro and Huwaida Arraf.” P 153-162.

 

Jessop, Maria, Diana Aljets, and Betsie Chacko. 2008. "The Ripe Moment for Civil Society." International Negotiation 13, no. 1: 93-109.

This article explores whether and how civil society engagement in a peace process can 'ripen' the conditions and facilitate the success of a peace process. The activities and methods of the Inter-religious Council of Sierra Leone are examined for their impact on each stage of the peace process with a view to shedding light on how civil society can help create the ripe conditions for formal peace negotiations, be an effective participant in negotiations, as well as improve the sustainability of a peace agreement.

Peacebuilding and Development Institute

Earn up to six credits this summer with PDI, while learning alongside experienced practitioners from conflict-affected and developing countries. Our interactive training courses integrate theory with cutting-edge practices. Register through my.american.edu.

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