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International Peace and Conflict Resolution | SIS

IPCR Skills Institutes

Overview: The International Peace & Conflict Resolution Skills Institute Program provides an opportunity for participants to acquire skills in conflict resolution and other related topics, which can be utilized in both professional and personal lives. These intensive training courses combine skills to work with conflicts that have international, community and public policy dimensions.

Objectives:

  • To introduce students to cutting edge practical skills outside of SIS.
  • To connect students with practitioners as a way of promoting networking between students who are looking to expand their contacts, and practitioners who may be in a position to hire interns or employees.
  • To provide students with a hands-on, interactive experience. The skills institute program is designed specifically to explore further the practical applications that complement theory taught in our program.
For SIS skills institute offerings, please click here.

Fall 2014 Skills Institutes

SIS.639.001: Media Relations in Relief Operations

Prof. Stefo Lehmann

September 5-7, 2014

This course will provide a foundation to enable students to develop productive media relationships during overseas humanitarian, reconstruction and peace-building interventions. Students will learn how to prepare for interviews, plan and conduct press conferences, design a message development plan and deliver effective responses during media engagements, culminating in video-recorded performance exercises by each student. The course also covers crisis and reputation management, communication models and provides an overview of the public affairs posture of major international participants in overseas relief operations.

SIS.639.002: Gender-focused Peacebuilding

Prof. Yves-Renee Jennings

September 19-21, 2014

This course focuses on gender and peace-building based on human rights, development, and basic human needs perspectives. You will acquire skills you can use during your professional career at the country, community, and public policy levels while taking into account key stakeholders, practitioners, and actors that participate in related processes. Students will develop practical skills that can apply to gender-focused peace-building efforts that are based on key international and national mandates while using frameworks and tools developed to help societies work toward the achievement of gender equality social change. This course will also look at how tools, such as gender analysis, gender-sensitive budgeting, monitoring and evaluation, can be used within gender-focused peace-building endeavors geared at ensuring that the human rights, development and basic human needs of both men and women are taken into account and fulfilled.

SIS.639.003: An Introduction to the Practice of Restorative Justice

Prof. Tarek Maassarani

October 24-26, 2014

The course is intended to introduce participants to the history and uses of restorative justice, as well as to support participants in learning and integrating key concepts, tools, and skills related to restorative justice. Meaningfully learning what restorative justice is, why it is relevant, and how to do it calls for an experiential and interactive format. In addition to intellectual exploration, participants will witness, experience, and practice alternative modes of thought and practice.

SIS.639.004: Advocacy for NGOs 

 Prof. David Alpher

November 14-16, 2014

NGOs working in development and conflict resolution face a perpetual challenge in translating the work they do to the "outside world"--in particular, the policy-makers whose writing, speech and action will shape the environment in which funding is appropriated, work defined and future possibilities shaped. The greatest impact will be made by those organizations that understand how to translate the work they do to outside audiences, navigating political sensitivities and security challenges relating to danger faced by in-country staff in order to shape policy and strategy. Lacking this capability, programmatic benefits are limited to the specific areas in which they take place, and the possibility of larger change through learned experience is lost. This course will instruct students in the advantages, pitfalls and necessities for an NGO advocacy program, and help to build the capacity to represent their organization well. 

Please click here for the fall 2014 skills institute announcement.

Spring 2014 Skills Institutes

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SIS 639.001 Nonviolent Action

January 24 - 26, 2014

Instructor: Daryn Cambridge

This course is designed to provide a multi-disciplinary perspective on nonviolent, civilian-based movements and campaigns that defend and obtain basic rights and justice around the world. Students will learn how the use of tactical innovation, new media and other strategies can bring about change through the exploration of successful and failed examples from the past.

SIS 639.002 Mechanisms for Transitional Justice

February 7 - 6, 2014

Instructor: Miki Jacevic

Transitional justice is an ever-growing field which addresses such immense complexities of protracted social conflict and responds to dilemmas over how successor regimes should deal with the troubled past. This course will explore key pillars of transitional justice and explore their practicality through simulations of various approaches.

SIS 639.003 Peacebuilding & Development in Conflict-Affected States

February 28 - March 2, 2014

Instructor: Sharon Morris

This course will examine a new model of civilian assistance in fragile states, one that tightly integrates peacebuildng and development. Students will explore key intersections of peacebuilding and topics such as economics, youth and governance, and efforts to evaluate the new civilian-based model through concrete programs examples already implemented by practitioners in a variety of contexts.

Fall 2013 Skills Institutes

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SIS 639.001 Conflict Analysis: Understanding Causes & Unlocking Solutions

September 13-15, 2013

Instructor: Lisa Schirch

Course Description: For practitioners in the field of conflict prevention and conflict management, effective action depends upon insightful analysis. This skills institute examines evolving global threats to peace and provides analytical tools for assessing both the causes of conflict and opportunities for productive engagement by third parties in order to prevent or mitigate violence. Through a series of practical exercises, students will learn to apply conflict analysis methods including conflict assessment frameworks, narrative analysis, conflict mapping, and scenario analysis.

SIS 639.002 Environmental Diplomacy Across Cultures

September 27-29, 2013

Instructor: Juliana Birkhoff

Course Description: Corporations, governments and community activists struggle to find common ground in resource-based conflicts that often become intractable. An impasse on environmental conflicts can hinder the implementation of potential conservation priorities as well as economic development opportunities. While recognizing the importance of constructive confrontation in cases of social justice, this course aims to consider how to most efficiently engage in environmental diplomacy. When should other options, such as legal action or sanctions be considered? How can agreements be negotiated between parties which have differing environmental values and assumptions about ecological science? The goal of this course is to familiarize participants with emerging international diplomatic process around environmental concerns, and the means by which agreements can be reached when dealing with a complex set of values and stakeholders., Through interactive sessions, students will work with several case examples developed by the Institute for Environmental Diplomacy and Security at the University of Vermont, in order to grapple with these environmental conflicts.

SIS 639.003 Qualitative Skills for Conflict Resolution

October 18-20, 2013

Instructor: Amr Abdalla

Course Description: This institute explores various research designs which can be utilized while completing research for a thesis in peace and conflict resolution, or other similar social science research. The course is designed to give students practical skills for researching their SRP (Substantial Research Paper requirement for completing the Master's degree), with a focus on qualitative analysis approaches such as content, narrative and critical discourse analyses.

SIS 639.004 International Project Management

October 25-29, 2013

Instructor: Jerrold Keilson

Course Description: Project management is not always a simple matter of putting tasks, critical milestones, and resources into a spreadsheet. It can be a complicated, choreographed dance, balancing needs of the implementing organization, the stakeholders, and the donor to get tasks done on time and on budget. Project management becomes even more complex when working internationally, when issues of culture, gender, power and priorities come into play.  This skills institute will eschew discussions of theory and focus on practical aspects of project management:  work-plans, results frameworks, evaluations, managing people across cultures, and managing budgets. In most instances there is no right or wrong way of managing a task, rather there is a question of trade-offs and cost-benefit. The course will include discussion and background reading, and will emphasize small-group activities to identify best practices for international project management in the field of peacebuilding.

SIS 639.005 Media Relations in Conflict Zones

November 15-17, 2013

Instructor: Stefo Lehmann

Course Description: Students learn to develop productive media relationships and understand the role of public affairs during overseas humanitarian, reconstruction and peace-building interventions. Students also learn how to recognize a communication crisis and prepare for crisis and reputation management. The course also covers management of press conferences, from planning to execution; delivering effective responses and methods to ensure mutually beneficial exchanges of information between organizations and the media. Useful for those building a career in all sectors US government, international organizations and humanitarian NGOs.

 

Spring 2013 Skills Institutes & Instructors

SIS 639.001 Nonviolent Action: A Force for Change

February 8-10, 2013

Instructor: Maciej Bartkowski & Daryn Cambridge 

Course Description: This short course is designed to provide a multi-disciplinary perspective on nonviolent, civilian-based movements and campaigns that defend and obtain basic rights and justice around the world - from Zimbabwe to West Papua and throughout the Middle East-North Africa region. Historically, political change in countries that curtail freedom and ignore international human rights norms has been difficult to achieve. Violent revolution or the use of armed force by external actors is typically seen as the primary means of overcoming oppression. Yet people power, relying on a variety of methods of nonviolent action, has been used for this purpose for well over a century in different parts of the world, by different peoples and societies, in different cultures and political systems, and with some impressive results as well as some apparent failures. Furthermore, countries that experience bottom-up, civilian-based resistance are known to have a better track record of successful democratic transitions than the states that initiated their systemic transformation after a protracted civil war, or due to top-down, elite-to-elite negotiations or external military interventions.

Instructor Biography: Dr. Maciej Bartkowski is the Senior Director for Education and Research at ICNC where he works on academic programs for students, faculty, and professionals, in curricular development, global academic, educational outreach and research in the emerging field of civil resistance studies. Dr. Bartkowski  speaks regularly about civil resistance at different academic and policy forums, conducts research, writes and teaches on nonviolent movements and strategic nonviolent conflict. He is an Adjunct Professor in the Sociology Department at George Mason University. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and M.A. in International Relations and European Studies from Central European University in Budapest, completed his undergraduate work at the American University of Central Asia in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, and speaks fluent English, Polish and Russian.

Daryn Cambridge is Director for Knowledge & Digital Strategies at the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict. He consulted with organizations such as One World Education; LearnServe International and the United States Association for the University of Peace. He served for three years as Assistant Director of the Democracy Matters Institute and then Director of Youth Programs at Common Cause. He has also been a Program Supervisor and Instructor with the Close Up Foundation, where he taught civic engagement workshops for young people from the United States, the Middle East, North Africa, and Eurasia. He serves on the boards of the Democracy Matters Institute and the Institute for Technology and Social Change. Daryn has a Master’s Degree in International Training and Education and a professional certificate in International Peace and Conflict Resolution from American University.


SIS 639.002 Design Thinking for Innovation

February 22-24, 2013

Instructors: Virajita Singh & Steve Kelley 

Course Description: This institute will teach innovative skills for applying design thinking to complex conflict resolution challenges. Design thinking is an emerging methodology, rooted in the tools and processes used traditionally by design disciplines (architecture, landscape architecture, graphic design, interior design, and others). It offers a significant way to create innovative solutions to systemic problems that affect our global society. Design thinking has a human-centered focus and a participatory process that involves problem definition, field research, generating ideas, story boarding, frequent prototyping and narrative as a mode for engaging participants and motivating action. After a brief introduction to the theory and practice of design thinking, students will work in teams to engage in a hands-on immersion in the design thinking process applied to several geopolitical conflict situations. Each team will apply design thinking to one of the identified conflict situations and work through the stages of the design process and prototyping to reach proposed solutions. The instructors will use an online process with enrolled students to identify conflict situations of interest to students.

Instructor Biography: Steve Kelley is a senior fellow at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota. He has worked on issues at the intersection of science, technology, and the environment with public policy, including STEM education, green chemistry, information technology, telecommunications, and innovation policy. In particular, Steve has advocated for the application of participatory design thinking to create innovative policies and public services. He has been a commercial litigation lawyer, served in the Minnesota Legislature for 14 years and currently serves on the boards of several nonprofit organizations.

Virajita Singh is a senior research fellow in the Center for Sustainable Building Research (CSBR) and adjunct assistant professor in the School of Architecture, College of Design. Her teaching and research focus on design, community and sustainability. Virajita leads an initiative to apply design thinking in teaching, research and outreach. Her recent design thinking outreach includes working with City of Minneapolis and Hennepin County to apply design thinking to homelessness issues and teaching a hands-on Design Thinking Lab involving student work for the City of Minnetonka. She is also the co-recipient of a University of Minnesota Center for Integrative Leadership research grant on the application of design thinking with integrative leadership.


SIS 639.003 Facilitation of Problem-Solving Workshops

March 1-3, 2013

Instructors: Chris Mitchell & Jannie Botes

Course Description: Problem-Solving Workshops (PSWs) are a form of Track II conflict resolution, implemented in such conflicts as Cyprus and Israel-Palestine. PSWs are specifically designed to engage unofficial representatives of conflicting parties in jointly analyzing their conflict with the assistance of third party facilitators. The goal of PSWs is to create mutually acceptable options for de-escalation, confidence building and resolution. This intensive course will include the selection and invitation of participants of a PSW, the process of running a PSW from invitations to re-entry, skill practice with feedback in the facilitator role, common issues that arise in PSWs and how to deal with them, common agenda items for PSWs and common forms of facilitator intervention.

Instructor Biography: Dr. Chris Mitchell is one of the pioneering thinkers of conflict analysis and resolution as a construct. He has been actively engaged in the area since the 1960’s as a thinker, researcher, mediator, and facilitator. He was on the team that developed “Track Two” interventions in protracted conflict situations. More recently, he heads the “Local Zones of Peace” project which examines local communities’ efforts to establish “zones of peace” in countries suffering from protracted conflicts.

Dr. Johannes Botes is currently a professor at the University of Baltimore where much of his research examines the connection between the news media and social conflict. Dr. Botes previously had a career in public radio and television in South Africa and was witness to much of the time over the struggle to end apartheid within the state. He often concentrates on conflict transformation and informal conflict management roles as key to conflict analysis and resolution. Additionally, he has developed the ‘Mothers and Fathers’ Project: An Oral History and Intellectual Map of the Field of Conflict Resolution.

SIS 639.004 The Role of Forgiveness and Reconciliation in the Healing of Political Violence

March 22-24, 2013

Instructor: Eileen Borris

Course Description: Can whole groups of people forgive? Can nations engage in processes that support forgiveness? In this program we will try to answer these questions by looking at intergroup forgiveness in different settings of political violence. We will examine different intergroup processes from various country perspectives and how they have been able to achieve group forgiveness. The course will use a combination of lecture, case studies, and interactive and experiential learning in order for students to understand these aspects. Then we will focus on understanding the pedagogy behind the "Schools of Forgiveness and Reconciliation", a process used to heal political violence in South America.

Instructor Biography: Dr. Eileen Borris is a clinical and political psychologist with 25 years experience in private practice, working in the international arena and academia, and receiving her doctorate from Columbia University. She is the Director of Training and Program Development at the Institute for Multi-Track Diplomacy in Washington, DC where she designs and implements training programs in international conflict resolution, mediation, negotiation, dialogue, multi-track diplomacy and peacebuilding, incorporating processes of forgiveness and reconciliation within the broader context of international peacebuilding. She is also a private consultant designing and implementing conflict resolution programs and developing "Schools of Forgiveness" in war torn countries for governments, IGO’s and NGO’s. She speaks often to different UN missions and agencies on the power of forgiveness and the healing of nations. Also, Dr Borris is an adjunct professor at the Thunderbird School of Global Management in the MBA program and a visiting professor at the National Defense University where she teaches on conflict transformation. Her interests include working in and teaching on war torn areas, facilitating dialogues and mediation processes and developing "Schools of Forgiveness and Reconciliation" between warring groups in conflict

SIS 639.005 Research Tools for Qualitative Interviewing 

March 29-31, 2013

Instructor: Dr. Irving Seidman

Course Description: This course introduces class participants to the basic assumptions underlying a phenomenological approach to interviewing which focuses on the perceptions people have as they reconstruct their own experience and reflect upon it. Through peer interviews, class participants will gain direct experience with the approach, including experience with the informed consent process, interviewing technique, working with and sharing interview material, issues of qualitative research and ethical issues in interviewing as qualitative research. In addition, class members will consider complexities that can develop in the context of research topics in peace and conflict resolution.

Instructor Biography: Irv Seidman is Professor Emeritus, University of Massachusetts Amherst School of Educat. He is the author of Interviewing as Qualitative Research: A Guide for Researchers in Education and the Social Sciences (Teachers College Press, 2006). Using a hands-on approach in his teaching, he introduces participants in his workshops and courses to a phenomenological approach to interviewing and explores its adaptability to their research goals and interests.


Fall 2012 Skills Institutes & Instructors


SIS 639.001 Designing Conflict Interventions

September 14-16, 2012

Instructor: Dr. Alma Jadallah

Course Description: This intensive course is designed to teach students full scale intervention strategies to address conflict situations in a variety of settings: organizational, communal, national and international. Drawing on actual case studies and scenarios from the US (business and domestic),as well as international work completed in Iraq, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon, and Egypt, students will learn how to select and apply assessment tools and conflict resolution processes to support a peaceful and constructive resolution of conflict that is contextually sensitive. In addition to applying theory to practice, students will be encouraged to engage in reflective practice in exploring and evaluating their role as third party intervenors.

Instructor Biography: As President & Managing Director of Kommon Denominator, Inc. Dr. Alma Abdul-hadi Jadallah has advised and worked on strategic projects related to conflict prevention and mitigation, training and education, and capacity building on the national and international levels. She has developed innovative solutions and provided services to a number of Fortune 500 companies, government and not for profit organizations. She is a skilled facilitator and has designed, directed and facilitated numerous dialogues on issues pertaining to gender, and protracted conflicts on the national and international level. Dr. AbdulHadi-Jadallah earned her Ph.D. from the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University and as an scholar / practitioner, she teaches graduate level courses in conflict resolution practice and theory at lead academic institutions such as the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University, Summer Peace Institute at Eastern Mennonite University, American University School of International Service / International Peace and Conflict Resolution Program, Georgetown University School of Government / M.A. Program in Conflict Resolution, affiliate faculty at the Women’s Center at George Mason University, and Visiting Scholar at the Center for Global Peace at American University.

SIS 639.002 Qualitative Skills for Conflict Resolution

September 28-30, 2012

Instructor: Dr. Amr Abdalla

Course Description: This institute explores various research designs which can be utilized while completing research for a thesis in peace and conflict resolution, or other similar social science research. The course is designed to give students practical skills for researching their SRP (Substantial Research Paper requirement for completing the Master's degree), with a focus on qualitative analysis approaches such as content, narrative and critical discourse analyses.

Instructor Biography: Amr Abdalla is a professor at the University of Peace in Costa Rica, as well as a leader in the field of peacebuilding and conflict resolution education and practice. Dr. Abdalla is actively involved in inter-faith dialogues in the United States and pioneered the development of the first conflict resolution training manual for Muslim communities in the US. He also founded Project LIGHT (Learning Islamic Guidance for Human Tolerance), a community peer-based anti-discrimination project funded by the National Conference for Community and Justice (NCCJ). Dr. Abdalla received his Ph.D. from the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

SIS 639.003 Tools for Successful Grantwriting: Crafting Measurable Outcomes

October 5-7, 2012

Instructor: Dr. Robert Penna

Course Description: In the grant writing process, outcomes showing actual impacts, benefits, or changes to a targeted audience are key to successfully procuring project funding. This course will focus on the theoretical grounding and actual practice of including outcomes in writing grants for community development and capacity building both internationally and domestically. Topics will include the basics of outcome theory, the characteristics of good outcomes, how to craft an outcomes statement and a value statement for inclusion in a grant proposal.  Also covered will be the basics of using a narrative (story) format for highlighting an organization’s accomplishments and the context within which it operates. Students will practice using all of these skills during the course, identifying outcomes for programs, crafting outcome and value statements, and creating an outline narrative account of a fictional program’s success.

Instructor Biography: Dr. Robert M. Penna has been consulting for Charity Navigator since 2009 and he consults on grants and performance measures, as its International Coordinator, responsible for the development of CN activities beyond U.S. borders. He provides his expert knowledge of the sector to help Charity Navigator develop grant proposals worldwide. He was also the senior consultant to The Rensselaerville Institute where he made important contributions Institute projects including the facilitation of seminars at the Institute’s Center for Outcome. He has worked on projects with the Ohio Outcome Funding Community Development effort, A.E. Casey Foundation, National Geographic Foundation and the Ford Foundation. He served as Project Lead on the Rensselaerville Institute’s three United Nations projects in 2003, which included: designing the prototype for the organization’s Programme Performance Report, heading the creation of materials for Rensselaerville Institute’s worldwide training seminars, and facilitating training sessions at UN Headquarters in New York. He is the author of The Nonprofit Outcomes Toolbox and served as the lead author of Outcome Frameworks, a book published in 2005. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Boston University with a specialization in urban and municipal affairs, and has taught as an adjunct professor of political science at Siena College.

SIS 639.004 International Project Management

October 19-21, 2012

Instructor: Jerrold Keilson

Course Description: Project management is not always a simple matter of putting tasks, critical milestones, and resources into a spreadsheet. It can be a complicated, choreographed dance, balancing needs of the implementing organization, the stakeholders, and the donor to get tasks done on time and on budget. Project management becomes even more complex when working internationally, when issues of culture, gender, power and priorities come into play. This skills institute will eschew discussions of theory and focus on practical aspects of project management: work-plans, results frameworks, evaluations, managing people across cultures, and managing budgets. In most instances there is no right or wrong way of managing a task, rather there is a question of trade-offs and cost-benefit. The course will include discussion and background reading, and will emphasize small-group activities to identify best practices for international project management in the field of peacebuilding.

Instructor Biography: Jerrold Keilson has spent thirty years working in international affairs. He is Vice President of Planning, Communications and Development at Creative Associates, an international consulting firm that supports education, democracy and counterinsurgency activities. Previously he worked for the International Youth Foundation as Vice President for Development. He also held senior positions in project operations and program development with America’s Development Foundation and Development Alternatives, Inc. From 1994-2002 he worked for World Learning, Inc, first as director of training and exchange services and for five years as director of program development. Prior to that he was employed by Agricultural Cooperative Development International, where he directed training programs in Central Europe and the Middle East. At Delphi International (1986-1993), he designed and directed exchange programs. Jerrold began his career in international affairs as a Foreign Service officer with the State Department. He has published on the need to incorporate historical understanding in the design of development projects, and on the importance and impact of public diplomacy and citizen diplomacy.

SIS 639.005 Environmental Diplomacy Across Cultures

November 2-4, 2012

Instructor: TBA

Course Description: Corporations, governments and community activists struggle to find common ground in resource-based conflicts that often become intractable. An impasse on environmental conflicts can hinder the implementation of potential conservation priorities as well as economic development opportunities. While recognizing the importance of constructive confrontation in cases of social justice, this course aims to consider how to most efficiently engage in environmental diplomacy. When should other options, such as legal action or sanctions be considered? How can agreements be negotiated between parties which have differing environmental values and assumptions about ecological science? The goal of this course is to familiarize participants with emerging international diplomatic process around environmental concerns, and the means by which agreements can be reached when dealing with a complex set of values and stakeholders.

Spring 2012 Skills Institutes & Instructors


SIS 639.006 - People Power: How and Why Nonviolent Action Works

February 10-12

Instructors: Dr. Maciej Bartkowski & Daryn Cambridge

Description: This short course is designed to provide a multi-disciplinary perspective on nonviolent, civilian-based movements and campaigns that defend and obtain basic rights and justice around the world - from Zimbabwe to West Papua and throughout the Middle East-North Africa region. Historically, political change in countries that curtail freedom and ignore international human rights norms has been difficult to achieve. Violent revolution or the use of armed force by external actors is typically seen as the primary means of overcoming oppression. Yet people power, relying on a variety of methods of nonviolent action, has been used for this purpose for well over a century in different parts of the world, by different peoples and societies, in differnt cultures and political systems, and with some impressive results as well as some apparent failures. Furthermore, countries that experience bottom-up, civilian-based resistance are known to have a better track record of successful democratic transitions than the states that initiated their systemic transormation after a protracted civil war, or due to top-down, elite-to-elite negotations or external military interventions.

Instructor Bio: Dr. Maciej Bartkowski is the Senior Director for Education and Research at ICNC where he works on academic programs for students, faculty, and professionals, in curricular development, global academic, educational outreach and research in the emerging field of civil resistance studies. Dr. Bartkowski speaks regularly about civil resistance at different academic and policy forums, conducts research, writes and teaches on nonviolent movements and strategic nonviolent conflict. He is an Adjunct Professor in the Sociology Department at George Mason University where he co-teaches a course on nonviolent civil resistance (Fall 2011). Dr. Bartkowski has also taught at the Bard College Globalization and International Affairs Program in New York, the Open Society Institute Undergraduate Exchange Program, Adelphi University and at the Academy of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. His recently co-authored articles include: A Human Right to Resist and Egypt: How to Negotiate the Transition. Lessons from Poland and China, and is currently completing an edited book project on Rediscovering Nonviolent Histor, Civil Resistance, Liberation Struggles and Nation-Making. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and M.A. in International Relations and European Studies from Central European University in Budapest, completed his undergraduate work at the American University of Central Asia in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, and speaks fluent English, Polish and Russian.

Instructor Bio:Daryn Cambridge is Director for Knowledge & Digital Strategies at the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict. He consulted with organizations such as One World Education, LearnServe International, and the United States Association for the University of Peace. He served for three years as Assistant Director of the Democracy Matters Institute and then Director of Youth Programs at Common Cause. He has also been a Program Supervisor and Instructor with the Close Up Foundation, where he taught civic engagement workshops for young people from the United States, the Middle East, North Africa, and Eurasia. He serves on the boards of the Democracy Matters Institute and the Institute for Technology and Social Change. Daryn has a Master’s Degree in International Training and Education and a professional certificate in International Peace and Conflict Resolution from American University.

SIS 639.002 - Collaborative Communication

February 17-19

Instructor: Tarek Maassarani

Description: In the heat of conflict, how can you deal with seemingly contradictory claims of truth? What about expressions of rage and the destructive impulses that might accompany it? How can you move past the blocks to deep listening and open communication? What can be done about the enemy images parties so tenaciously hold of each other? Collaborative communication is model for clear communication, authentic human connection, and empathic understanding that has supported effective conflict resolution in diverse international and domestic contexts. Using a wide variety of interactive and self-reflective exercises, this course will offer conflict transformation skills and perspectives to empower students to understand and engage constructively with these bewildering dynamics. The collaborative communication model will be applied to high-profile conflicts, such as the Rwandan genocide and racial divisions in the U.S., as well as to conflicts that students encounter in their personal lives.

Instructor Bio: At American University, Tarek Farouk Maassarani has served as a lecturer in the field of conflict resolution and an adviser to the Dialogue Development Group. He is a member of the community peacebuilding team at the Latin American Youth Center and also provides dispute resolution services, including mediation, dialogue facilitation, training, peace education, and legal representation, to organizations, schools, and members of the local DC community. On an international level, Tarek has practiced and published on international human rights law, produced a documentary film on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and carried out educational and community development projects in Africa and the Middle East. Tarek holds a Masters in International Affairs from Columbia University's School for International and Public Affairs, a J.D. from Georgetown University, as well as a B.S. in Environmental Studies and B.A. in Cultural Anthropology from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

SIS 639.007 Mechanisms for Transitional Justice

February 24-26

Instructor: Miki Jacevic

Description: To address such immense complexities of protracted social conflicts, the field of transitional justice has grown over the past twenty years into a globalized form of intervention following civil war and political repression. Transitional justice is an ever-growing field which responds to dilemmas over how successor regimes should deal with the troubled past. It comprises of a range of mechanisms, approaches and processes associated with a society's attempts to come to terms with a large scale past abuses in order to ensure accountability and serve justice, as well as to achieve healing, reconciliation, truth, and conflict transformation.

Instructor Bio: Mirsad "Miki" Jacevic is chief training officer at The Institute for Inclusive Security and is a human rights activist and peace program specialist from Sarajevo, Bosnia and Hercegovina. He also directs Bosnia program at Global Youth Connect, taking delegation of students to explore issues of transitional justice and reconciliation to Bosnia. During the war, he was involved in numerous projects to ease the suffering of youth and the elderly. Previously, Miki directed the Emerging Leaders Project at the State of the World Forum and managed child soldiers’ reintegration efforts at Search for Common Ground. Now, he oversees Inclusive Security’s training program to help them remain focused on promoting inclusion of civil society, with an emphasis on women's groups, in all stages of the peace process. Mr. Jacevic also directs the Institute's programs in Afghanistan and Pakistan and has managed efforts in Bosnia, Colombia, and Liberia. Miki has led workshops and consultations on inclusion of civil society in various aspects of peace processes in 40 countries. He is a PhD candidate at the George Mason University's School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, where he received his master's degree.

SIS 639.003 Theater, Dialogue Facilitation & Conflict Analysis

March 2-4

Instructor: Dr. Kelly Howe

Description: This course will rehearse for genuine encounter, exploring theatrical facilitation as a mode of conflict analysis and dialogic engagement. Our primary focus will be Theatre of the Oppressed, a set of techniques articulated by Brazilian theatre theorist/practitioner August Boal, though we will also explore relationships between Boal and other artist-facilitators. Valuing theory and practice equally, we will embody a variety of theater techniques and build knowledge together about what it means to facilitate theatrical dialogues with ethical specificity.

Instructor Bio: Dr. Kelly Howe is an activist, teacher, artist, writer, and dialogue facilitator based in Oak Park, Illinois, and serves as President of the Board of Directors for Pedagogy & Theatre of the Oppressed. As a faculty member at North Central College, she teaches courses in performance and social change, theatre history, script analysis, and acting; she also directs plays and mentors students interested in theatre for dialogue, applied theatre, community-based or devised performances, dramaturgy, and/or theory and criticism. Kelly’s research interests include Theatre of the Oppressed and other forms of activist performance; community-based performance; critical pedagogy; and feminist, queer, and critical race theory. Recently she began writing about the satirical agit-prop performances of the group Billionaires for Wealthcare, as well as other theatrical contributions to conversations on U.S. health care reform, 2008-2010. She has facilitated summer performance devising programs for youth in Louisville’s Portland neighborhood, and she currently sits on the advisory board for the Houston Forum For Arts In Health. As an artist, she specializes in collaborative devising, Forum Theatre, and new play direction. She holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Performance as Public Practice from the University of Texas at Austin and a B.A. in Theatre and English from Muhlenberg College.

SIS 639.005 Research Tools for Qualitative Interviewing

March 30-April 1

Instructor: Dr. Irving Seidman

Description: This course introduces class participants to the basic assumptions underlying a phenomenological approach to interviewing which focuses on the perceptions people have as they reconstruct their own experience and reflect upon it. Through peer interviews, class participants will gain direct experience with the approach, including experience with the informed consent process, interviewing techniques, working with and sharing interview material, issues of qualitative research and ethical issues in interviewing as qualitative research. In addition, class members will consider complexities that can develop in the context of research topics in peace and conflict resolution.

Instructor Bio: Irv Seidman is Professor Emeritus, University of Massachusetts Amherst School of Education. He is the author of Interviewing as Qualitative Research: A Guide for Researchers in Education and the Social Sciences (Teachers College Press, 2006). Using a hands on approach in his teaching, he introduces participants in his workshops and courses to a phenomenological approach to interviewing and explores its adaptability to their research goals and interests.

Each Skills Institute runs from 4-9 pm on Fridays and 9-5 on Saturday and Sunday. For additional information, please contact the IPCR Skills Institute Assistant at 202-885-1622 or via email at ipcrskills@american.edu.

Fall 2011 Skills Institutes & Instructors

SIS 639.002 Qualitative Research Skills for PCR

Date: Sept. 30-Oct. 2

Instructor: Amr Abdalla

Course Description: This institute explores various research designs which can be utilized while completing research for a thesis in peace and conflict resolution, or other similar social science research. The course is designed to give students practical skills for researching their SRP (Substantial Research Paper requirement for completing the Master's degree), such as drafting research questions and formulating them in researchable ways, as well as developing data gathering methods, including interviews, focus groups, and observations.

SIS 639.001 Peace Education at Home and Abroad: Interpersonal, Institutional and International Applications

Date: Sept. 16-18

Instructor: Steven Brion-Meisels

Course Description: The course will provide an overview of peace education frameworks and strategies that can be applied to interpersonal (conflict resolution, violence prevention, mediation), institutional (school climate, restorative justice) and international contexts. Within the context of students’ cultural identities and experiences, participants in this course will work as a community to understand the roots of peacemaking, learn about peace education frameworks, identify and practice some key strategies, and explore international applications (drawing on work in Colombia and the West Bank region of Israel/Palestine).

SIS 639.004 Grant Writing and Proposal Development

Date: Nov. 4-6

Instructor: Mathilda Harris

Course Description: This workshop is geared for those who wish to understand how to match their proposals to the guidelines of donor agencies and begin writing grants that will result in procuring funding for their projects.  Students will understand how to navigate the world of grant procurement, focus on the key sections of successful proposals and demonstrate that their projects merit the excellence and innovation that bring them to the top of other submissions. They will also understand the diversity of the funding community and how to respond to various guidelines. The sessions will cover the overall strategic plan of grant-writing, including, but not limited to, a needs statement, mission, goals, objectives, activities, evaluation, key personnel and budgets. All sessions engage the students in interactive exercises, writing, lectures and discussions so that all they will leave the class understanding how to research, write and develop a specific project.

SIS 639.005 Effective NGO Activism

Date: Nov. 11-13

Instructor: Joe Eldridge

Course Description: The course is intended for students who are considering a career in nonprofit peacemaking or peacebuilding organizations. Effective activism is that which first accomplishes, and then sustains, its aims. It sets its own agenda rather than primarily reacting and responding to those of others. The ability to win the hearts-and-minds of others is at the core of effective activism. In this Institute students will examine why some activists are successful advancing a situation in a way that is sustainable, while others flounder or see their once heralded victories unravel not long after they are celebrated. Students will have an opportunity to create, reflect on and refine their personal “theory of activism”. Students who have previously had internships or fulltime employment with NGO’s will have opportunities to distill, learn from, and share these experiences. Because activism is a verbal activity, this Institute will be taught in a way that is highly interactive with opportunities to make presentations, lead discussions and work in teams.

SIS 639.003 Conflict Resolution Skills and Processes

Date: Oct. 7-9

Instructor: Nike Carstarphen

Course Description: This institute will provide participants with an introduction to the field of international conflict resolution, focusing on causes, dynamics of escalation, analysis, and responses to conflict. The course will utilize experiential education methods to examine the multiple and overlapping current, historical, and global factors that contribute to conflict.Using a variety of models and mapping techniques, participants will analyze conflicts and reflect on interventions that might interrupt the cycles of revenge that are characteristics of protracted conflicts.Case studies in peacebuilding will be presented for understanding the possible ranges of response to conflicts.

Spring 2011 Skills Institutes & Instructors

SIS 639.001 Collaborative Communication: An Applied Framework for Peacebuilding

Date: January 21-23

Instructor: Tarek Maassarani

Biography: At American University, Tarek Farouk Maassarani is a lecturer in the field of peacebuilding and an adviser to the Dialogue Development Group. He also provides dispute resolution services, including mediation, dialogue facilitation, training, peace education, and legal representation, to organizations, schools, and members of the local DC community. On an international level, Tarek has practiced and published on international human rights law, produced a documentary film on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and carried out educational and community development projects in Africa and the Middle East. Tarek holds a Masters in International Affairs from Columbia University's School for International and Public Affairs, a J.D. from Georgetown University, as well as a B.S. in Environmental Studies and B.A. in Cultural Anthropology from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Course Description: In the heat of conflict, how can you deal with seemingly contradictory claims of truth? What about expressions of rage and the destructive impulses that might accompany it? How can you move past the blocks to deep listening and open communication? What can be done about the enemy images parties so tenaciously hold of each other? Collaborative communication is model for clear communication, authentic human connection, and empathic understanding that has supported effective conflict resolution in diverse international and domestic contexts. Using a wide variety of interactive and self-reflective exercises, this course will offer conflict transformation skills and perspectives to empower students to understand and engage constructively with these bewildering dynamics. The collaborative communication model will be applied to high-profile conflicts, such as the Rwandan genocide and racial divisions in the U.S., as well as to conflicts that students encounter in their personal lives.

SIS 639.002 Applications of Technology for Peacebuilding

Date: February 11-13

Instructors: Dr. Michael Gibbons and Nicholas C. Martin

Biography: Mr. Michael Gibbons teaches courses in international training, education and development at The American University, George Washington University and the Monterey Institute for International Studies. He leads “Leadership <> Learning”, a program supporting inter-agency learning in basic education, child rights and social justice. Current projects include support for a funders’ group for international education, advising the grantmaking programs of several private foundations, advising programs for the Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies, Child Protection and Care Learning Network, Coalition to Protect Education from Attack, The International Rescue Committee, Save the Children, and supporting selected local NGOs in Africa and Asia working on education and child rights. He holds a Ph.D. from the Fielding Institute in human and organizational development, with a focus on organizational learning processes within educational programs. He is particularly interested in the role learning plays in personal development and social transformation.

Nick Martin is the co-founder and President of TechChange: The Institute for Technology and Social Change. TechChange trains leaders to leverage emerging technologies for sustainable social change. Before launching TechChange, Nick was the Executive Director of the US Association for the United Nations mandated University for Peace (UPEACE/US). He remains a visiting professor at the University for Peace, where he teaches courses in the role of technology in peacebuilding, development and humanitarian work. Nick is the founder of two innovative digital media and conflict transformation programs: DCPEACE and PeaceRooms. In 2009, Nick was selected as a Global Fellow by the International Youth Foundation and a Washington DC Humanities Council Scholar for his leadership in launching the programs and his track record as a young social entrepreneur. Nick is also an advisor to Ashoka, the US Institute of Peace (USIP) and a number of other leading organizations. Nick received his B.A. with honors from Swarthmore College and an M.A. in Peace Education from the United Nations mandated University for Peace (UPEACE).

Description: The advent of new and rapidly evolving technologies has fundamentally changed the capacity for processing and exchanging information in the 21st century. Citizens, NGOs, governments, and companies alike are just beginning to understand the potential that these tools and systems can have in analyzing and addressing a range of social problems. This skills institute will explore how technology is being used to foster learning and collaboration, transform conflicts, fight diseases, monitor elections, distribute food, design better economic development measures, and much more. It will also consider some of the key challenges related to access, implementation, scale, and evaluation that working with technology presents. Through a hands-on and interactive learning approach that draws from a number of real world examples, students can expect to develop a practical set of strategies and skills that will prepare them to apply new technologies to social change work amid this rapidly evolving landscape.

SIS 639.003 Managing the Hidden Dimensions of Peacebuilding

Date: February 18-20

Instructor: Dr. Louise Diamond

Biography: Louise Diamond, Ph.D., is the co-founder (with Ambassador John McDonald) and President Emeritus of the Institute for Multi-Track Diplomacy in Washington, D.C., where she worked for many years as a professional peacebuilder. She is also the founder of The Peace Company, seeking to make peace practical, popular, and profitable while showing that peace is good business. She currently directs Peace Systems, where she is focused on training global leaders who can help humanity make the quantum leap in evolution that our times require. She also directs the Peace Councils Project, and publishes The Peace Report, an online monthly newsletter linking the personal and global by reflecting on world affairs through a peace lens. She is also a conference planner, who designed and delivered the Building a Culture of Peace conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Louise received a Ph.D. in Peace Studies from the Union Institute in 1990 and an advanced CAS degree in Human Resource and Organizational Development from the University of Vermont in 1974.

Description: What are the dynamics of a conflict system – its entrenched patterns, power games, and missed opportunities? How does the conflict affect us, even as we are hoping to affect it? What is the energy of peace; of hatred; fear; revenge; forgiveness; or violence? What is the role of the peacebuilder in defining possible futures for people and planet during these critical times? This course offers personal and practical skills for managing these and other hidden dimensions of peacebuilding – the systemic, the personal, the vibrational, and the evolutionary. The primary learning vehicle is a highly engaging simulation of a third-party intervention in a prototypical asymmetric ethnic conflict. We learn by doing, reflecting, building theory, and seeking out the often-invisible but profound elements of our craft.

SIS 639.004 Media and Conflict Resolution

Date: March 18-20

Instructor: Dr. Peter Lemish

Biography: Peter Lemish is an educational activist, university lecturer, and independent researcher whose primary areas of teaching, research, and activism include: the roles of the media in conflict transformation, citizen media in conflict zones, employing action research to develop NGO uses of the media, and journalistic dilemmas in investigating social issues. His most current action research project seeks to assist media producers throughout the world employ non-militaristic approaches to representations of conflict resolution in news, non-fiction, and fiction programs.

Description: This introductory, skills-oriented course focuses on developing understandings and capabilities for advancing conflict transformation processes through encounters with media producers (e.g., reporters, news editors, bloggers, documentary or fiction filmmakers). In doing so, six inter-related issues and clusters of skills will be addressed: (1) managing encounters between the worlds of the mass media, conflict, political institutions, and civil society; (2) utilizing the changing roles of the media throughout the transformation process; (3) framing media messages and representations; (4) assessing and maximizing the capabilities of different mass media and genres in advancing conflict transformation; (5) utilizing encounters with the media for participant and institutional development; and (6) addressing the ethical dilemmas involved in work with the media. Participants will apply their learning to critique and/or to develop media initiatives in a real/imagined conflict transformation process.

SIS 639.005 Human Rights Monitoring

Date: April 1-3

Instructor: Tarek Maassarani

Description: This course will provide students with the necessary skills to monitor international human rights violations in global armed conflicts. This highly participatory class will instruct students on all forms of human rights monitoring, from the traditional preparation of reports, advocacy and interventions to the newest innovations in the use of monitoring technology, such as satellite imagery and Google Earth. Participants will gain theoretical and practical knowledge on the principles and methods of human rights monitoring in conflicts, both rapid onset and protracted. Students will learn, through a recent case study, how to recognize and address human rights concerns such as refugee and internally displacement, onset of humanitarian catastrophe, increased incidents of violence against civilians, clampdowns on freedom of expression and civil liberties. Students will also gain a solid understanding of the laws of war, in order to apply these standards to monitoring and responding to the egregious crimes of Genocide, Crimes against Humanity, Aggression and War Crimes.