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NSLC College Credit Program        School of International Service 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington, DC 20016-8071 United States

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Students may only enroll in the AU course associated with their particular NSLC program. All courses are taught online. Students will attend an introductory session while on campus and access instructional materials upon returning home at hours that suit their own schedules. This instruction may include lectures recorded by their professor, podcasts, documentaries, and discussion posts. Readings and assignments will be available via AU's Blackboard platform. Professors remain accessible to student questions 30 days after the on-campus segment.

Course Offerings

Public Speaking (1 credit)

Public Speaking is a critical component of successful leaders. In today's world, the ability to present one's thoughts clearly is key to success. Whether you choose to join the Peace Corps or work in a Fortune 500 company, understanding the value of storytelling and public speaking will differentiate you from your colleagues and peers. For many, public speaking is daunting; for a few, it comes naturally. But like most things, with a few tricks of the trade and a lot of practice, we can all become confident and effective public speakers. The focus of this course will be on preparation, examination, organization, and delivery aspects of public speaking. The skills you build will also be applicable to other areas of your life. The readings, course activities, and course projects are created to strengthen your skills. Active listening will be examined as a fundamental prerequisite for effective and efficient public communication. We will make ongoing efforts to learn from our experiences during the time in this NSLC program and through deliberate critiques; all of these activities will improve our communication skills.

Topics in Biotechnology (1 credit)

Recent advances in the study of genome function reveal the fluidity and flexibility of the information encoded in our DNA. Gene structure, gene positioning within chromosomes, non-coding DNA sequences and the chemical structure of the nucleotides are all factors in how genetics impact our daily lives and development. Biotechnology is the collection of tools scientists use to manipulate and modify genomes for use in pharmaceuticals, medicine, agriculture and the criminal justice system. Techniques including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing, and molecular cloning allows us to isolate and characterize portions of DNA, so we may ultimately create new DNA sequences, new proteins and even entirely synthetic organisms. Students in this course will obtain and analyze a variable gene (CDK) from their classmates using PCR and DNA sequencing. A course database of CDK gene sequences will be organized and analyzed with tools and methods designed by each student based on their own hypotheses and experimental design. This project will provide first-hand experience in the biotechnology fields of genomics and proteomics.

Sustainable Development and Design (1 credit)

This American University course adds to your NSLC experience by introducing you to the concept of sustainable development. Engineers do a good deal more than build and fix things. As problem solvers, engineers can play a fundamental role in facing development challenges - or in making them worse. In this class, we will examine what drives the need for environmentally and socially sustainable design, and we will explore possible solutions. Some questions we will discuss are: What does it mean to design products that are good for people and for the planet? How do we build products without negative social and environmental impacts? How can engineers apply their skills to address problems in developing countries? This course builds on your NSLC field trips and workshops to explore sustainable engineering with a combination of design exercises, film excerpts and lectures.

Sustainable Development and Design (1 credit)

This American University course adds to your NSLC experience by introducing you to the concept of sustainable development. Engineers do a good deal more than build and fix things. As problem solvers, engineers can play a fundamental role in facing development challenges - or in making them worse. In this class, we will examine what drives the need for environmentally and socially sustainable design, and we will explore possible solutions. Some questions we will discuss are: What does it mean to design products that are good for people and for the planet? How do we build products without negative social and environmental impacts? How can engineers apply their skills to address problems in developing countries? This course builds on your NSLC field trips and workshops to explore sustainable engineering with a combination of design exercises, film excerpts and lectures.

Public Speaking (1 credit)

Public Speaking is a critical component of successful leaders. In today's world, the ability to present one's thoughts clearly is key to success. Whether you choose to join the Peace Corps or work in a Fortune 500 company, understanding the value of storytelling and public speaking will differentiate you from your colleagues and peers. For many, public speaking is daunting; for a few, it comes naturally. But like most things, with a few tricks of the trade and a lot of practice, we can all become confident and effective public speakers. The focus of this course will be on preparation, examination, organization, and delivery aspects of public speaking. The skills you build will also be applicable to other areas of your life. The readings, course activities, and course projects are created to strengthen your skills. Active listening will be examined as a fundamental prerequisite for effective and efficient public communication. We will make ongoing efforts to learn from our experiences during the time in this NSLC program and through deliberate critiques; all of these activities will improve our communication skills.

International Diplomacy and Cross-Cultural Negotiation (1 credit)

Diplomacy has been a significant form of interaction between sovereign entities since antiquity. In our time of tremendous social, political, and economic change, diplomacy persists as a prominent feature of international relations. It has been alternatively reviled as facilitating war and misperception, too antiquated to mitigate global issues, yet also praised as the only useful process for peace and effective communication. In this course, we will explore how scholars and practitioners have viewed diplomacy, offering arguments about its function, practice, limits, and response to change. The course itself consists of three lectures, an introductory class via Skype, and an online component.

Fundamentals of Law (1 credit)

Fundamentals of Law will introduce you to the American legal system, law, the role of the lawyer, and legal writing. We will learn about the structure and function of the legal system, and look at the process of resolving grievances through the courts. Additionally, we will review the key substantive areas in criminal and civil law, highlighting controversial issues in each. Finally, we will learn about the different roles that lawyers and judges can play, as well as their unique ethical obligations. Throughout the course, you will learn how to use legal terminology, conduct legal writing, and examine the many interesting facets of the American legal system.

Global Public Health (1 credit)

This course approaches health care as much more than an individual- or local-level activity. Rather, it is embedded in a complex global system of health threats and responses. This arena, global public health, brings together scientific, economic, and political issues, and the outcomes eventually affect billions of lives. We will discuss the historical development of the field, the state of public health around the world, and the prospects for combating current and future health threats. The politics and advocacy movements around certain important issues (like HIV/AIDS) will be a particular focus. Finally, this course is designed to be a college experience and will emphasize the critical analysis and other skills that are required for university-level work.

Political Action and Public Policy (1 credit)

The course examines why and how individuals organize to influence government in the development of public policy. Students are introduced to interest group politics, effective advocacy, the tools of political communication, and policy development and analysis. The course will examine critical domestic policy areas, such as energy, environment, education, health, justice, and economic stability.

Cross-Cultural Communication for International Business (1 credit)

Business is conducted in an increasingly globalized economy with diverse people, economic systems, and global forces. This course seeks to give students the knowledge and skills necessary to thrive in a global economy. The course begins with an overview of global economics and trade, introducing international institutions that influence international business. Next, the course conceptualizes culture and discusses its implications for business. Through case studies, simulations, and other activities, students develop cultural awareness in the areas of management, negotiations, and marketing. Students who complete the course are better prepared to assume leadership roles in the global economy.

Sustainable Development and Design (1 credit)

This American University course adds to your NSLC experience by introducing you to the concept of sustainable development. Engineers do a good deal more than build and fix things. As problem solvers, engineers can play a fundamental role in facing development challenges - or in making them worse. In this class, we will examine what drives the need for environmentally and socially sustainable design, and we will explore possible solutions. Some questions we will discuss are: What does it mean to design products that are good for people and for the planet? How do we build products without negative social and environmental impacts? How can engineers apply their skills to address problems in developing countries? This course builds on your NSLC field trips and workshops to explore sustainable engineering with a combination of design exercises, film excerpts and lectures.

International Business and the Global Economy (1 credit)

The course will seek answers to some of the most pressing questions facing today's world. For example, what are the main challenges international businesses face when navigating the increasing patterns of global interdependence and trade? How are goods, people and ideas moving around the world in new ways? If globalization goes beyond our borders, it underscores the fact that problems such as financial crises, conflicts, and environmental concerns are now experienced on a global scale, affecting countries, businesses and communities. This class will be interdisciplinary in nature in order to reflect the challenges international businesses and entrepreneurs face in today's globalized world. This class will therefore examine the intersection of globalization, economic development, political science, the environment and gender issues. Through the use of videos, newspaper articles and other media tools, we will uncover what it means for businesses and individuals to be globally oriented in today's world.

Cross-Cultural Communication for International Business (1 credit)

Business is conducted in an increasingly globalized economy with diverse people, economic systems, and global forces. This course seeks to give students the knowledge and skills necessary to thrive in a global economy. The course begins with an overview of global economics and trade, introducing international institutions that influence international business. Next, the course conceptualizes culture and discusses its implications for business. Through case studies, simulations, and other activities, students develop cultural awareness in the areas of management, negotiations, and marketing. Students who complete the course are better prepared to assume leadership roles in the global economy.

Forensic Science (1 credit)

This introductory course, designed for students who are interested in learning the fundamentals of using science to solve crime, provides a basic overview of the crime scene investigation process, and the issues involved in the presentation of forensic evidence in court. Students learn about the identification, documentation, and collection of physical evidence, including fingerprints, shoe impressions, hair and fibers, firearms evidence, and questioned documents. The class discusses the impact of television and other media on the field of forensic science.

Intelligence and National Security (1 credit)

This course is designed to introduce students to the role that intelligence plays in contemporary national security. The class will begin with a discussion of what security actually means, followed by an overview of the concept of national security and the different ways we protect the United States. The course will explore the nature of contemporary threats by focusing on what constitutes a threat in the first place and by discussing whether today's threats are different and more challenging than those of the past. Finally, the class will investigate the tough choices policy-makers are forced to make on a daily basis. Threats, responses, and intelligence are rarely crystal-clear, necessitating a set of very high-stakes decisions by national leaders. The follow-up assignments will allow students to explore these issues in greater depth in written format. Students will finish the course with a deeper appreciation for the nuances of security studies, threat assessment, and intelligence practice.

Public Speaking (1 credit)

Public Speaking is a critical component of successful leaders. In today's world, the ability to present one's thoughts clearly is key to success. Whether you choose to join the Peace Corps or work in a Fortune 500 company, understanding the value of storytelling and public speaking will differentiate you from your colleagues and peers. For many, public speaking is daunting; for a few, it comes naturally. But like most things, with a few tricks of the trade and a lot of practice, we can all become confident and effective public speakers. The focus of this course will be on preparation, examination, organization, and delivery aspects of public speaking. The skills you build will also be applicable to other areas of your life. The readings, course activities, and course projects are created to strengthen your skills. Active listening will be examined as a fundamental prerequisite for effective and efficient public communication. We will make ongoing efforts to learn from our experiences during the time in this NSLC program and through deliberate critiques; all of these activities will improve our communication skills.

Public Speaking (1 credit)

Public Speaking is a critical component of successful leaders. In today's world, the ability to present one's thoughts clearly is key to success. Whether you choose to join the Peace Corps or work in a Fortune 500 company, understanding the value of storytelling and public speaking will differentiate you from your colleagues and peers. For many, public speaking is daunting; for a few, it comes naturally. But like most things, with a few tricks of the trade and a lot of practice, we can all become confident and effective public speakers. The focus of this course will be on preparation, examination, organization, and delivery aspects of public speaking. The skills you build will also be applicable to other areas of your life. The readings, course activities, and course projects are created to strengthen your skills. Active listening will be examined as a fundamental prerequisite for effective and efficient public communication. We will make ongoing efforts to learn from our experiences during the time in this NSLC program and through deliberate critiques; all of these activities will improve our communication skills.

Global Public Health (1 credit)

This course approaches health care as much more than an individual- or local-level activity. Rather, it is embedded in a complex global system of health threats and responses. This arena, global public health, brings together scientific, economic, and political issues, and the outcomes eventually affect billions of lives. We will discuss the historical development of the field, the state of public health around the world, and the prospects for combating current and future health threats. The politics and advocacy movements around certain important issues (like HIV/AIDS) will be a particular focus. Finally, this course is designed to be a college experience and will emphasize the critical analysis and other skills that are required for university-level work.

Topics in Psychology and Neuroscience (1 credit)

Students interested in medicine, the behavioral sciences, or life sciences will learn how the structure and function of the nervous system relates to human memory, learning, emotions, and sensations; and how psychologists understand normal and abnormal behaviors in terms of these processes. Over the last twenty years, knowledge of the brain has been greatly enhanced by the development of new neuroscience tools and techniques to examine neuroanatomy, neuropharmacology, and neurophysiology. Students will learn how to interpret results of brain imaging and neuropsychological tests, which are used to probe the functioning of the human brain in both normal and abnormal states. Students will also learn about the value of animal models to understanding brain structure and function. They will perform simulations of brain and spinal cord of sheep dissections; and study the structure of nerve cells (neurons) and nerve pathways that connect our extremities to the central nervous system via the peripheral nervous system. The neurons of these systems are able to conduct signals based both on electrical current and chemically-mediated neurotransmitter-receptor mechanisms. Students will read primary literature and design experiments to test their own hypotheses on how changes in neurotransmitter levels affect behavior and nervous system development. Students will be able to apply what they learn to what is known about psychological conditions such as addiction, schizophrenia, and depression.

Public Speaking (1 credit)

Public Speaking is a critical component of successful leaders. In today's world, the ability to present one's thoughts clearly is key to success. Whether you choose to join the Peace Corps or work in a Fortune 500 company, understanding the value of storytelling and public speaking will differentiate you from your colleagues and peers. For many, public speaking is daunting; for a few, it comes naturally. But like most things, with a few tricks of the trade and a lot of practice, we can all become confident and effective public speakers. The focus of this course will be on preparation, examination, organization, and delivery aspects of public speaking. The skills you build will also be applicable to other areas of your life. The readings, course activities, and course projects are created to strengthen your skills. Active listening will be examined as a fundamental prerequisite for effective and efficient public communication. We will make ongoing efforts to learn from our experiences during the time in this NSLC program and through deliberate critiques; all of these activities will improve our communication skills.