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Drawing students from all over the world, AU's top-ranked SIS has the largest faculty and most comprehensive curriculum of any school of international affairs in the United States. With our D.C. location and a multidisciplinary approach that marries theory and practice, you won't find a better place to build your global practice of service.

Note: The following class lists contain only courses offered within SIS; other courses may apply.

Fall 2017 Thematic Areas Course Offerings

Newly Added Courses

SISU-466-001 History of Racism
Tuesday 8:20 PM - 10:50 PM
Prof. Ibram Kendi

This course examines the history of anti-Black racist ideas. The course of study spans from the origins of racist ideas in 15th century Western Europe, to their expansion with the slave trade in the 16th century, to the scientific revolution in the 17th century, to the European Enlightenment in the 18th century, to the emergence of racist ideas in the United States. This class studies the dual history of antiracist progress delegitimating racist ideas and the simultaneous progression and sustained sophistication of racist ideas over the course of modern history.

Counts towards the IRGC Thematic Area


SISU-330-006 The End of the Cold War
Thursday 2:30PM - 5:20PM
Prof. Sarah Snyder

For almost fifty years, the world was largely defined by the Cold War's ideological and geographic terms. To the surprise of almost all observers, it ended without widespread destruction or loss of life. This course explores the end of the Cold War chronologically and thematically. The course begins by examining efforts at detente in the 1970s and ends with the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, the reunification of Germany, and the breakup of the Soviet Union. The assigned readings and class discussion helps students assess the causes and effects of the end of the Cold War as understood by participants at the time and current observers such as political scientists and historians. For example, students study the power of personality, examining the roles of United States President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Students also examine key developments such as ongoing arms control negotiations and the rise of the Polish trade union movement. In addition, during the semester students evaluate how culture, the economy, politics, human rights activism, Western ideas, and nationalism each contributed to the end of the Cold War. The objectives of this course are to promote critical, analytical thinking about Cold War history and to encourage students to think in an international context to develop their own interpretation of the evolution and significance of the end of the Cold War. In addition, the assignments are structured to strengthen students' oral and written communication skills, including those of persuasion, argumentation, and presentation.

Counts towards the FPNS Thematic Area

The Peace, Global Security and Conflict Resolution thematic area explores the causes and consequences of war as they relate to competing understandings of peace and security. Courses in this area help students assess the choices as well as challenges involved in preventing, resolving, and managing conflict. Students engage theories and historical cases from international security, strategic studies, human security, peace studies, and conflict resolution to conceptualize war and insecurity. The gateway course begins this journey by establishing the broader philosophical traditions associated with competing schools of thought. Students examine the different definitions of peace, security, and conflict as well as general patterns of violence and insecurity in the world. The course builds on this foundation by introducing students to the dynamics of political violence and different peacebuilding and conflict resolution mechanisms.

Gateway Course


SISU-210-001 Peace, Global Security, and Conflict Resolution 
M, Th 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM

SISU-210-002 Peace, Global Security, and Conflict Resolution 
M, Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

SISU-210-003 Peace, Global Security, and Conflict Resolution 
M, Th 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM

SISU-210-004 Peace, Global Security, and Conflict Resolution 
M, Th 4:05 PM - 5:20 PM

SISU-210-005 Peace, Global Security, and Conflict Resolution 
T, F 12:55 PM - 2:10 PM


Thematic Area Courses


SISU-310-001 
Dynamics of International (In)Security 
Monday, Thursday 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. David Ohls

This course examines questions such as: Do states fight more today than in the past; Do they fight in different places and in different ways; Have the dynamics, the institutions, and the actors that influenced conflict and war in the past changed in recent years, or are they similar in today's international arena. This course looks at some of the main factors that have played a role in producing or preventing conflict in the past, and examines the degree to which they have evolved in today's world. The course looks at, among other issues, alliances, territorial conflicts, civil-military relations, military doctrines, deterrence, and terrorism, through the lenses of past and present cases of war and conflict.

SISU-310-002 Migration and Security 
Monday, Thursday 11:20 AM - 12:35 PM 
Prof. Chris Rudolph

How do security interests affect how states deal with international migration? Migration significantly affects various dimensions of security, including defense, homeland security, economic security, and societal security. This course examines how the security environment affects immigration, refugee, and border policies. Special emphasis is placed on explaining policy development in major advanced industrial immigrant-receiving countries, including the United States, Germany, France, and Great Britain. Students also have the opportunity to develop an independent research project dealing with policy development in a case not covered by the syllabus readings.

SISU-310-003 Gender and Conflict 
Monday, Thursday 11:20 AM - 12:35 PM 
Prof. Tazreena Sajjad

Gender continues to be a powerful means through which we see the world and how we see each other. In the context of conflict, social conceptions of gender have been used to justify political and social violence, delineate codes of responsibility for violence and abuse, define roles in the context of war and its aftermath, and legitimize social, economic, and political hierarchies at the micro, meso and macro levels.This course aims at critically looking at questions of power, performance and privilege and their subsequent implications at each stage of conflict organized around three models: (i) the militarization of society; (ii) the conduct and nature of warfare; and (iii) the aftermath of war including peacemaking, peacekeeping and peace building.

SISU-310-004 Culture and International Security 
Monday 8:10 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. Shalini Venturelli

This course addresses the challenge of international instability as seen in the cases of Afghanistan and Iraq through the lens of the sociocultural environment of conflict. It examines the struggle for the hearts and minds of the population, the cultural evolution of insurgent networks, the capabilities of security organizations including police and military organizations in fighting the insurgency, civilian governance and leadership in conflict zones, the role of international intervention and international organizations, the information, communication and media environment, the battle of narratives and narrative strategies, the challenge of strengthening host national security and governance capabilities through training and advising, and lessons for future conflicts from Iraq and Afghanistan. 

SISU-310-006 Intervention in Civil War 
Monday, Thursday 8:10 AM - 9:25 AM 
Prof. Susanna Campbell

The past twenty-five years has seen a rapid expansion in the number and type of international actors intervening to stop, prevent, or mitigate the effects of. These international actors engage in peacekeeping, peacemaking, conflict prevention, peacebuilding, development, and humanitarian intervention, often within the same country and at the same time. This course will take an actor-centric perspective, unpacking the political, legal, and organizational causes of the behavior and effectiveness of International Organizations, Non-Governmental Organizations, states, and private contractors during civil war.

SISU-310-007 Peace and International Organizations 
Thursday 2:30 PM - 5:20 PM 
Prof. Charles Call

The UN and other international organizations like the European Union, the African Union and the World Bank, have become much more involved in preventing and ending armed conflicts since 1991. This course will critically examine the role of international organizations, especially the UN, in peace negotiations, peacekeeping and post-conflict peacebuilding. Students will analyze successful and failed cases of peace efforts. 

SISU-318-001 Causes of War 
Tuesday 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM 
Prof. Benjamin Jensen

Through this course students become familiar with some of the major theoretical issues in the study of global security as well as key actors and institutions. In addition to addressing central issues such as war and conflict, weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, the course helps students apply theories and existing bodies of knowledge to better understand contemporary and emerging global security issues.

SISU-318-002 Causes of War 
Monday, Thursday 8:10 AM - 9:25 AM 
Prof. Claire Metelits

Through this course students become familiar with some of the major theoretical issues in the study of global security as well as key actors and institutions. In addition to addressing central issues such as war and conflict, weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, the course helps students apply theories and existing bodies of knowledge to better understand contemporary and emerging global security issues.

SISU-318-003 The Politics of Nuclear Weapons 
Thursday 8:10 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. Sharon Weiner

The United States is currently poised to invest an estimated $1 trillion in modernizing its nuclear arsenal. Terrorist access to nuclear weapons and materials remains a top national security concern. Russia, meanwhile, is modernizing its arsenal and seems increasingly willing to use nuclear threats in support of an aggressive foreign policy agenda. This course will help students understand the role of nuclear weapons in U.S. decisions about national security including the politics of nuclear weapons decision making in the United States, the role of nuclear weapons more broadly in U.S. strategy, and explanations for why other countries pursue, develop, or forego nuclear weapons. 

SISU-318-005 The Human Face of Battle 
Monday 5:30 PM - 8:00PM 
Prof. Nora Bensahel and David Barno

This course examines the experience of war from the viewpoint of the frontline soldier, sailor, airman or Marine. The course will seek to understand what makes young men and women both fight and protect their comrades in the face of grave risks to personal survival, and look at how policy decisions made safely in national capitals translate into deadly combat tasks for young men and women in combat under fire. We will use works of fiction and nonfiction in literature and film to reflect on the enduring nature of war throughout modern history. Understanding what our societies ask of soldiers in battle is essential for future policymakers to make responsible decisions on how and when to use military force.

SISU 359-001 Environment, Conflict, and Peace 
Tuesday, Friday 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM 
Prof. Ken Conca

The focus of the emerging interdisciplinary field of environmental peacemaking, with its focus on relationship-building between conflict actors, is to identify ways that the environment, natural and human, provides opportunities for building bridges of collaboration between conflicting parties. In this course, students deal with concepts from ecopolitics, environmental security studies, international relations, and conflict resolution to develop an understanding of the theoretical framework informing the emerging environmental peacemaking paradigm. The course examines the interactions among violence, conflict, peace, security, and the natural environment. It is structured to create the context for students to address questions including what impact violent conflict has on the environment; is environmental degradation itself a source or trigger of violent conflict; and how environmental cooperation can be used to promote peace and sustainable development.

The Global Economy aims at exploring the social, political and economic benefits and costs of global integration by studying the channels through which it occurs: trade, financial flows, migration, cultural exchanges and illicit traffics, just to mention a few. This thematic area explores how globalization changes the world and alters the political, economic and social prospects of nations and their citizens. It also considers how international organizations struggle to manage this complex process and create governance structures to adapt to these changes and how national governments attempt to balance their sovereign mandate to govern and protect their people, with the frequently disrupting financial and trade-related impacts of global competition. A more integrated world has raised the living standards of millions of people, yet it is blamed for causing all sorts of damages to societies, the environment, national cultures and domestic sovereignty. Students will study the political economy of this evolving international landscape and analyze economic growth, winners and losers, and the legitimacy of these changes.

Gateway Course


SISU-220-001 International Political Economy
T, F 12:55 PM - 2:10 PM

SISU-220-002 International Political Economy
M, Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

 

Thematic Area Courses

SISU-320-002 International Money & Finance
Monday, Thursday 11:20 AM - 12:35 PM
Prof. Krista Tuomi

Over the last few decades financial markets have become increasingly integrated. This has the potential to magnify the effect of economic shocks.  National monetary and financial policies therefore have important international implications, as does the structure of the international system. This course addresses contemporary and historical issues in international financial relations.  Emphasizing key political and economic concepts, it examines international financial crises, the evolution of the international monetary system, and the merits of alternative exchange rate policies. It also analyses some of the new developments challenging the “old order”. This includes things like cryptocurrencies, high frequency trading, the carry trade, vulture funds and much more.

SISU-329-001 Global Economic Governance
Thursday 5:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Prof. Andrew Wolfe

A study of the entrepreneurial, corporate, and governmental forces and organizations that have shaped international commerce and cross-border finance. The course examines how private-sector and official institutions in particular have become more or less relevant in light of fast-paced globalization since the 1960s, the challenges these institutions currently face, and how these institutions interact with and react to developments in commodity and financial markets.

The Foreign Policy and National Security thematic area features course offerings on U.S. foreign policy, war and diplomacy, and both national and global security concerns. The gateway course for this thematic area is Analysis of U.S. Foreign Policy (SISU-230), which aims to provide students with an understanding of broad historical trends and traditions in U.S. foreign policy; the ability to assess the main theoretical perspectives relevant to the field of U.S. foreign policy; the ability to identify the key actors, institutions, and political processes involved in the making of U.S. foreign policy; the capacity to analyze selected contemporary policy issues; and an opportunity to demonstrate research, analytical, writing, and presentation skills. 

Gateway Course

SISU-230-001 Analysis of US Foreign Policy 
T, F 12:55 PM - 2:10 PM

SISU-230-002 Analysis of US Foreign Policy 
M, Th 11:20 AM - 12:35 PM

SISU-230-003 Analysis of US Foreign Policy 
M, Th 4:05 PM - 5:20 PM

SISU-230-004 Analysis of US Foreign Policy 
T, F 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM

SISU-230-005 Analysis of US Foreign Policy 
M, Th 12:55 PM - 2:10 PM
 

Thematic Area Courses

SISU-318-001 Causes of War 
Tuesday 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM 
Prof. Benjamin Jensen

Through this course students become familiar with some of the major theoretical issues in the study of global security as well as key actors and institutions. In addition to addressing central issues such as war and conflict, weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, the course helps students apply theories and existing bodies of knowledge to better understand contemporary and emerging global security issues.

SISU-318-002 Causes of War 
Monday, Thursday 8:10 AM - 9:25 AM 
Prof. Claire Metelits

Through this course students become familiar with some of the major theoretical issues in the study of global security as well as key actors and institutions. In addition to addressing central issues such as war and conflict, weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, the course helps students apply theories and existing bodies of knowledge to better understand contemporary and emerging global security issues.

SISU-318-003 The Politics of Nuclear Weapons 
Thursday 8:10 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. Sharon Weiner

The United States is currently poised to invest an estimated $1 trillion in modernizing its nuclear arsenal. Terrorist access to nuclear weapons and materials remains a top national security concern. Russia, meanwhile, is modernizing its arsenal and seems increasingly willing to use nuclear threats in support of an aggressive foreign policy agenda. This course will help students understand the role of nuclear weapons in U.S. decisions about national security including the politics of nuclear weapons decision making in the United States, the role of nuclear weapons more broadly in U.S. strategy, and explanations for why other countries pursue, develop, or forego nuclear weapons.

SISU-318-005 The Human Face of Battle 
Monday 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM 
Prof. Nora Bensahel and David Barno

This course examines the experience of war from the viewpoint of the frontline soldier, sailor, airman or Marine. The course will seek to understand what makes young men and women both fight and protect their comrades in the face of grave risks to personal survival, and look at how policy decisions made safely in national capitals translate into deadly combat tasks for young men and women in combat under fire. We will use works of fiction and nonfiction in literature and film to reflect on the enduring nature of war throughout modern history. Understanding what our societies ask of soldiers in battle is essential for future policymakers to make responsible decisions on how and when to use military force.

SISU-330-002 Al-Qaeda, ISIS, & War on Terror 
Monday, Thursday 12:55 PM - 2:10 PM 
Prof. Daniel Schneider

On September 11, 2001, American suddenly became aware of a terrorist organization known as al-Qaeda. More recently, news of terrorist attacks and other atrocities taking place in the Middle East and Europe has made Americans, and people throughout the world, aware of the organization known as ISIS (or ISIL), an Islamist terrorist group that some experts believe presents a greater danger to the United States than does al-Qaeda. This course will address the histories, ideologies, leadership, goals and tactics of these two groups. It will also look at the efforts made by western and Middle eastern government to develop a strategy to defeat them, the policy disputes that have arisen in trying to develop a strategy, and the effectiveness of these strategies. The course will also place the formation and objectives of al-Qaeda and ISIS in a broader context by exploring the recent history and demographic, political and social changes in the Middle East.

SISU-330-003 U.S.-Israel Relations 
Tuesday, Friday 12:55 PM - 2:10 PM 
Prof. Guy Ziv

This course explores the evolution of U.S. relations with Israel, from the establishment of the Jewish state in 1948 to the present day. Along the way, it examines key milestones in U.S.-Israel relations, beginning with President Truman's controversial decision to buck the U.S. foreign policy establishment and formally recognize the state of Israel; the wartime American airlift in 1973; the U.S. role in Arab-Israeli peacemaking, from Secretary of State Henry Kissinger's shuttle diplomacy to the two Camp David summits and beyond; and the U.S. role in providing military, economic, and diplomatic aid to the Jewish state. The course analyzes how a combination of sentimental, political, and strategic factors have led to the formation of a wholly unique bilateral relationship characterized at once by both tight bonds and inherent tensions.

SISU-330-005 U.S. Allies in War on Terror 
Monday, Thursday 8:10 AM - 9:25 AM 
Prof. Stephen Tankel

Effective counterterrorism is impossible with the cooperation of partner nations. Yet most partners both help and hinder U.S. efforts. This course explores what the United States can expect from its partners and how U.S. policymakers can optimize counterterrorism cooperation other countries provide.

SISU-330-006 The End of the Cold War
Thursday 2:30PM - 5:20PM
Prof. Sarah Snyder

For almost fifty years, the world was largely defined by the Cold War's ideological and geographic terms. To the surprise of almost all observers, it ended without widespread destruction or loss of life. This course explores the end of the Cold War chronologically and thematically. The course begins by examining efforts at detente in the 1970s and ends with the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, the reunification of Germany, and the breakup of the Soviet Union. The assigned readings and class discussion helps students assess the causes and effects of the end of the Cold War as understood by participants at the time and current observers such as political scientists and historians. For example, students study the power of personality, examining the roles of United States President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Students also examine key developments such as ongoing arms control negotiations and the rise of the Polish trade union movement. In addition, during the semester students evaluate how culture, the economy, politics, human rights activism, Western ideas, and nationalism each contributed to the end of the Cold War. The objectives of this course are to promote critical, analytical thinking about Cold War history and to encourage students to think in an international context to develop their own interpretation of the evolution and significance of the end of the Cold War. In addition, the assignments are structured to strengthen students' oral and written communication skills, including those of persuasion, argumentation, and presentation.

Global Inequality and Development is concerned with the pressing challenges of poverty alleviation and global inequality. Courses will focus on the evolution and current practices in the field of international development, emphasizing theories that have influenced its underlying premises, and resulting policies, programs, and political arrangements. Students will engage in critical examinations of key propositions that emerge in contemporary debates, from the very definition of development to potential costs, benefits and limitations of various policies and interventions.

This thematic area directly addresses issues concerning the theory and practice of achieving equitable and sustainable human development. Courses will encompass a broad examination of issues related to poverty and inequality as they intersect with urban and rural geographies, the built and natural environment, food systems, conflict, education, gender, youth and development, and possibilities for bilateral and multilateral cooperation. This area will include historical analysis of the field of development studies from colonialism through the present with a focus on understanding and analyzing conflicts, shared goals, and normative values embedded in development objectives. Students will become equipped to understand and analyze the multiple causes and consequences of development and inequality, and will become better equipped to understand the mechanisms of governance best able to respond to these challenges.

Gateway Course


SISU-240-001 International Development 
T, F 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

SISU-240-002 International Development 
M, Th 11:20 AM - 12:35 PM

SISU-240-003 International Development 
M, Th 12:55 PM - 2:10 PM

SISU-240-004 International Development 
T, F 4:05 PM - 5:20 PM

SISU-240-005 International Development 
T, F 12:55 PM - 2:10 PM
 

Thematic Area Courses

SISU-340-003 Geography of Uneven Development 
Tuesday, Friday 4:05 PM - 5:20 PM 
Prof. Erin Collins

In this we will explore key spatial dualisms that structure our world and the way we think about it. We will unpack concepts like local/global rural/urban, first world/third world, highlighting the interconnect histories and processes that have produced geographies of uneven development.

SISU-340-004 Migration and Development 
Monday, Thursday 12:55 PM - 2:10 PM 
Prof. Tazreena Sajjad

This course provides students with informed views on migration issues. It introduces several important topics that should be in the minds of (current and future) policymakers when approaching and designing migration-related policies. While taking a mostly economic approach to the issues of migration and economic development, the course offers a variety of viewpoints from different social sciences, and from different perspectives.

SISU-348-003 Gender and Development 
Thursday 2:30 PM - 5:20 PM 
Prof. Vidyamali Samarashinghe

This course examines from an interdisciplinary and international perspective how development is gendered and creates different meanings, impacts, and processes for women around the world. Students explore the different theoretical approaches used in understanding women's situations in developing societies and examine the impact of production and reproduction, politics, globalization, environment, and migration on women in different parts of the developing world. Students probe the success and failure of development strategies in incorporating women into the development process and explore new approaches to ensure women's empowerment and their agency to fully participate in development processes.

SISU-349-001 Politics of Conservation 
Monday, Thursday 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. Scott Freeman

This course considers the environmental and human impacts of environmental conservation interventions. From parks and protected areas to carbon financing, we will consider what conservation attempts to do and examine its intended and unintended consequences, particularly as they pertain to marginalized groups. 

SISU-349-002 Global Hunger 
Tuesday, Friday 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. Lauren Carruth

This class is designed to challenge students to think critically and practically about the problem of hunger in our world. The first part of the class provides overviews of malnutrition and food insecurity as epidemiological, economic, human rights, and medical problems, as well as interventions in response. We examine the cultural meanings of food, as well as the "quadruple burden of malnutrition," or important connections between acute malnutrition, chronic malnutrition, micronutrient deficiencies, and chronic diseases related to obesity and overweight. We will then examine the lived experiences of hunger and intervention in several different settings: among migrant farmworkers in the United States, among communities with rising rates of obesity in post-war Guatemala, and among displaced persons in the Horn of Africa. As a part of this course, students will engage with a nonprofit agency or school in the D.C. area to apply their course knowledge.

SISU-349-003 Health in the Developing World 
Tuesday, Friday 11:20 AM - 12:35 PM 
Prof. Thespina Yamanis

This course provides students with an understanding of the relationships between health and development from a variety of perspectives. Students gain knowledge of the linkages between health, socio-economic growth, and equity in different countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Attention is given to some of the most urgent public health challenges facing developing countries, including the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The course also introduces students to the skills required for planning, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of health programs in developing countries.

The Environmental Sustainability and Global Health (ESGH) thematic area is concerned with the conditions required for human flourishing on a resource-constrained planet. Many of the most profound challenges facing humanity relate to the environment, health, or the intersection of the two. Climate change and species extinction currently undermine the quality of life for many and threaten, in the extreme, to compromise the fundamental, organic infrastructure that supports all life on earth. Infectious diseases like HIV and malaria remain a major cause of death in poorer countries, while chronic diseases, once most apparent in richer countries, are becoming increasingly prevalent around the world. Meanwhile, environmental toxins, air and water pollution, and soil degradation compromise the health and well-being of peoples everywhere. Not only do ecological issues have the potential to impact public health, but decisions made by communities and the private and public sectors-from transportation to agriculture-markedly influence ecosystem functions.

At a conceptual level, the ESGH thematic area introduces students to the socio-political dynamics of global health and environmental affairs. It explores the multiple causes and consequences of environmental harm and ill health, and has students work to understand the mechanisms of governance best able to respond. Cutting across both issues are the fundamental inequalities between people as well as between countries that exacerbate the impacts of environmental and health problems, and hamper identification and implementation of solutions. Ultimately, ESGH offers students the chance to develop the intellectual and applied tools needed to simultaneously work towards a safer, saner planetary condition and healthier populations.

Gateway Course


SISU-250-001 Environmental Sustainability and Global Health 
M, Th 11:20 AM - 12:35 PM

SISU-250-002 Environmental Sustainability and Global Health 
T, F 11:20 AM - 12:35 PM

SISU-250-003 Environmental Sustainability and Global Health 
T, F 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM
 

Thematic Area Courses

SISU-349-001 Politics of Conservation 
Monday, Thursday 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. Scott Freeman

This course considers the environmental and human impacts of environmental conservation interventions. From parks and protected areas to carbon financing, we will consider what conservation attempts to do and examine its intended and unintended consequences, particularly as they pertain to marginalized groups. 

SISU-349-002 Global Hunger 
Tuesday, Friday 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. Lauren Carruth

This class is designed to challenge students to think critically and practically about the problem of hunger in our world. The first part of the class provides overviews of malnutrition and food insecurity as epidemiological, economic, human rights, and medical problems, as well as interventions in response. We examine the cultural meanings of food, as well as the "quadruple burden of malnutrition," or important connections between acute malnutrition, chronic malnutrition, micronutrient deficiencies, and chronic diseases related to obesity and overweight. We will then examine the lived experiences of hunger and intervention in several different settings: among migrant farmworkers in the United States, among communities with rising rates of obesity in post-war Guatemala, and among displaced persons in the Horn of Africa. As a part of this course, students will engage with a nonprofit agency or school in the D.C. area to apply their course knowledge.

SISU-349-003 Health in the Developing World 
Tuesday, Friday 11:20 AM - 12:35 PM 
Prof. Thespina Yamanis

This course provides students with an understanding of the relationships between health and development from a variety of perspectives. Students gain knowledge of the linkages between health, socio-economic growth, and equity in different countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Attention is given to some of the most urgent public health challenges facing developing countries, including the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The course also introduces students to the skills required for planning, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of health programs in developing countries.

SISU-350-002 Sustainable Cities 
Monday, Thursday 12:55 PM - 2:10 PM 
Prof. Victoria Kiechel

For the first time in world history, the number of people living in urban areas exceeds the number of people living in rural areas. In acknowledging the urgent demands of our urban present and future, this course examines the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of contemporary cities. Because projections show that most population growth will continue to take place in and around cities, this course makes the case for sustainable development as a way to mitigate the impacts of human growth. The course explores what is, and what could be, by discussing these themes: urban sprawl, slums and slum typology, green urban planning, air and water quality, new paradigms for energy/water/waste infrastructure, green building, sustainable materials, and whole systems design. The class considers how to measure sustainability and discusses the effectiveness of sustainability indicator and examines governance structures, social entrepreneurship, and the power of information technology and social networks in promoting sustainable development and the diffusion of ideas. The transformative role of art and culture in our sustainable urban future is also highlighted.

SISU-359-001 Environment, Conflict, and Peace 
Tuesday, Friday 2:30PM - 3:45 PM 
Prof. Ken Conca

The focus of the emerging interdisciplinary field of environmental peacemaking, with its focus on relationship-building between conflict actors, is to identify ways that the environment, natural and human, provides opportunities for building bridges of collaboration between conflicting parties. In this course, students deal with concepts from ecopolitics, environmental security studies, international relations, and conflict resolution to develop an understanding of the theoretical framework informing the emerging environmental peacemaking paradigm. The course examines the interactions among violence, conflict, peace, security, and the natural environment. It is structured to create the context for students to address questions including what impact violent conflict has on the environment; is environmental degradation itself a source or trigger of violent conflict; and how environmental cooperation can be used to promote peace and sustainable development.

Issues of identity, whether avowed or ascribed, socially constructed or naturally derived, fundamentally shape people's lives and the life of society. In particular, race, gender, class, religion, sexual orientation, and nationality are determinate identities for many though in reality everyone holds multiple identities at the same time. Although they often appear to be static and fixed from the outside, these identities are dynamic and ever-changing driven by the broader cultural and social influences in which they arise and exist. The construction and salience of these identities, in particular, rises with the emergence of the modern world system. Culture is critical in the construction and re-construction of identities made more complex in the contemporary era by processes of economic, political, and cultural globalization. The digital age, especially, introduces new variables in shaping identity that brings together local, national, regional and global actors leading to multiple configurations of self and community. Courses in this thematic, at the undergraduate and graduate levels, examine the nature of these identities in a world in transition. Our courses, embodying both theoretical and grounded approaches, explore each of these identities in their own right but also in a historical and an intersectional manner that explores the relationship between them.

 

Gateway Courses

SISU-260-002 Identity, Race, Gender, Culture 
M, Th 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM

SISU-260-004 Identity, Race, Gender, Culture 
T, F 8:10 AM - 9:25 AM
 

Thematic Area Courses

SISU-466-001 History of Racism  
Tuesday 8:20 PM - 10:50 PM

Prof. Ibrahm X. Kendi

This course examines the history of anti-Black racist ideas. The course of study spans from the origins of racist ideas in 15th century Western Europe, to their expansion with the slave trade in the 16th century, to the scientific revolution in the 17th century, to the European Enlightenment in the 18th century, to the emergence of racist ideas in the United States. This class studies the dual history of antiracist progress delegitimating racist ideas and the simultaneous progression and sustained sophistication of racist ideas over the course of modern history.

SISU-348-003 Gender and Development 
Thursday 2:30 PM - 5:20 PM 
Prof. Vidyamali Samarasinghe

This course examines from an interdisciplinary and international perspective how development is gendered and creates different meanings, impacts, and processes for women around the world. Students explore the different theoretical approaches used in understanding women's situations in developing societies and examine the impact of production and reproduction, politics, globalization, environment, and migration on women in different parts of the developing world. Students probe the success and failure of development strategies in incorporating women into the development process and explore new approaches to ensure women's empowerment and their agency to fully participate in development processes.

SISU-360-002 Discourse and Power in International Development: The West and the Rest 
Monday, Thursday 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM 
Prof. Marion Dixon

The great sociologist, Stuart Hall, once stated, 'Our ideas of "East" and "West" have never been free of myth and fantasy, and even to this day they are not primarily ideas about place and geography'. This course examines International Development with a focus on the colonial and post-colonial discourses of the modern, civilized 'West' and the uncivilized, pre-modern 'Rest'. This historical perspective offers reflections on relations of race, class, gender and culture in the making of International Development. The course gives particular weight to the perspectives and voices of colonized subjects and citizens of the global South to understand the effects of these ideas on the modern era.

SISU-360-004 African Political Thought 

Tuesday, Friday 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM 
Prof. Kwaku Nuamah

This course is a broad survey of comparative themes in African political thought. It reviews how Africans perceive political developments-past as well as current-on their continent. Our aim is to highlight (through a review of selected indigenous works of literature, political biographies, and social commentary), seminal thoughts on some of the issues and challenges that have shaped African state building pathways and journeys from pre-colonial times to the present. Specific topics covered in the course include: ideas of citizenship and political rights in traditional African society; conceptualizations of the trauma of slavery and its socioeconomic aftermath; assessments of the colonial legacy; thoughts on resistance to colonialism, proto-nationalism, and the struggle for independence; neocolonialism and the challenges of the post-colonial state; the concepts of the African personality, pan-Africanism, and Nkrumah's dreams of continental unity; African socialism, Ujamaa economics, and the rise and fall of the redistributive state; authoritarianism, single party systems, and democratic reversals; thoughts on mass protests, coups and sociopolitical revolts; conceptualizations of neopatrimonialism, ethnicity and corruption in studies of African political culture; explanations of the trauma of apartheid, antiapartheid activism, and solidarity politics in Africa; Sankofa, Ubuntu, and the concept of African renaissance.

SISU-365-001 The World of Islam 
Tuesday, Friday 4:05 PM - 5:20 PM 
Prof. Akbar Ahmed

The inner dynamic of Islamic culture and an inside look at the workings of Islamic society, a society seen as a whole with its own characteristic inner force and propellant. Original readings illustrating the Islamic paradigm and discussion of the complex relationship among reform, renewal, and fundamentalism stemming from this paradigm.

SISU-379-001 Nazi Germany and the Making of the Holocaust 
Tuesday, Friday 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. Mirjana Morosini-Dominick

The rise of Nazism in Germany remains one of the most studied phenomena in modern history. This course explores the circumstances and the ideas that led to the creation of the Third Reich and its implementation of the Holocaust. Special attention will be paid to the role that science - especially biomedical science - has played in constructing Nazi racial policy, the ideology of Nazism, and the subsequent execution of the Final Solution to the Jewish question.

SISU-466-001 History of Racism 
Tuesday, Friday 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. Ibram Kendi

This course examines the history of anti-Black racist ideas. The course of study spans from the origins of racist ideas in 15th century Western Europe, to their expansion with the slave trade in the 16th century, to the scientific revolution in the 17th century, to the European Enlightenment in the 18th century, to the emergence of racist ideas in the United States. This class studies the dual history of antiracist progress delegitimating racist ideas and the simultaneous progression and sustained sophistication of racist ideas over the course of modern history.

The courses that constitute the Justice, Ethics and Human Rights thematic area wrestle with the thorny issues of justice, equality and human rights. How do we create more just societies? What are the conditions that promote or impede collective violence and mass murder? What kinds of peace settlements are long lasting? Can we protect human rights and simultaneously reduce poverty and inequality? What kinds of criminal and transitional justice systems are both fair and effective at reducing abuse? Students in the program will learn about an array of empirical cases and master the pertinent theoretical and ethical debates.

Gateway Course

SISU-270-001 Human Rights 
T, F 11:20 AM - 12:35 PM

SISU-270-002 Human Rights 
T, F 12:55 PM - 2:10 PM
 

Thematic Area Courses

SISU-370-001 Human Rights: The United States' Relationship with Genocide 
Monday 8:10 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. Jeffrey Bachman

Despite being the first state to sign the Genocide Convention on December 11, 1948, the U.S. failed to ratify the treaty until November 25, 1988. This dichotomy has been used effectively to portray the U.S. as the leader that lost its way. The use of leadership to describe the U.S. role in drafting the Genocide Convention has an obvious positive connotation. Through its leadership, the U.S. guided the other members of the international community on the path to outlawing a crime that shocked the conscience of humankind not once, but twice in the first half of the twentieth century. If it were not for American leadership, a treaty prohibiting the crime of genocide might not have been realized. What these accounts ignore is the impact of U.S. leadership on the language of the Genocide Convention. The contestable narrative that seeks to define America's relationship with genocide does not end with the role the U.S. played during the drafting of the Genocide Convention. The narrative excludes various historical cases involving the U.S. that could constitute genocide, some more controversial than others, while also critiquing the U.S. for what it has failed to do in response to genocide rather than what it has done to facilitate the commission of the crime. In this course, students will explore the U.S. relationship with genocide through a critical lens by investigating historical and controversial cases, from the settler colonial era to present day.

SISU-372-001 Human Rights in East Asia 
Monday, Thursday 12:55 PM - 2:10 PM 
Prof. Pek Koon Heng-Blackburn

Course considers issues of human rights and culture in East Asia.

SISU-379-001 Nazi Germany and the Making of the Holocaust 
Tuesday, Friday 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. Mirjana Morosini-Dominick

The rise of Nazism in Germany remains one of the most studied phenomena in modern history. This course explores the circumstances and the ideas that led to the creation of the Third Reich and its implementation of the Holocaust. Special attention will be paid to the role that science - especially biomedical science - has played in constructing Nazi racial policy, the ideology of Nazism, and the subsequent execution of the Final Solution to the Jewish question.

The Global and Comparative Governance (GCG) thematic area is designed for students who are interested in how a range of actors (local, national, global) seek to understand and solve the compelling security, development, environmental and economic problems of our time. GCG also focuses on the role of civil society and the development of international norms and regimes in world politics, including international law. Students can specialize in geographic regions, as well as investigate the overarching problems that transcend national borders. Students will take a multidisciplinary approach and will acquire the skills to empirically evaluate phenomena, anticipate emerging trends, and interpret data through an innovative curriculum that emphasizes theory and applied knowledge.

Gateway Course

SISU-280-004 Ruling the World: Comparative and Global Governance 
T, F 11:20 AM - 12:35 PM

SISU-280-005 Ruling the World: Comparative and Global Governance 
T, F 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM

SISU-280-006 Ruling the World: Comparative and Global Governance 
M,Th 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM
 

Thematic Area Courses

SISU-329-001 Global Economic Governance 
Thursday 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM 
Prof. Andrew Wolfe

A study of the entrepreneurial, corporate, and governmental forces and organizations that have shaped international commerce and cross-border finance. The course examines how private-sector and official institutions in particular have become more or less relevant in light of fast-paced globalization since the 1960s, the challenges these institutions currently face, and how these institutions interact with and react to developments in commodity and financial markets.

SISU-380-001 Empire and Imperialism 
Thursday 8:10 AM - 11:00 AM 
Prof. Yang Zhang

A great deal of human history is the history of empires. This course considers empire as an ever-lasting and overarching form of governance and as an important lens for understanding contemporary global powers. It discusses how historic empires-e.g., Rome, China, Britain, and Japan-deployed military forces, built ideological hegemony, exerted indirect rule, and governed heterogeneous peoples. Special attention will be given to European imperialism that created and shaped the modern world. The ongoing imperial practices of the United States, Russia, and China will also be examined in comparison to their precedents, counterparts, and competitors.

SISU-380-002 International Law 
Tuesday 8:20 PM - 10:50 PM 
Prof. Zakir Hafez

Institutions of international politics, with emphasis on the nature and function of international law.