Expand AU Menu

Upcoming

The 10th Annual Spring 2015 Film Series

An SOC Signature Series—with host Chris Palmer. The event is free and open to the public – no reservations required.

Malsi Doyle & Michael Forman Theater, American University
4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016-8017
Directions: http://www.american.edu/maps/
Metro: Tenleytown/AU, shuttle bus service to AU
 
For more information, please contact:
Chris Palmer (202) 885-3408 or palmer@american.edu

For complete film series details, please click here.

Stephanie Flack

Photo credit Amy Moore

- TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3 at 7 pm -
Highlights from the March 17-29, 2015 Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital
EFF is the largest and longest running environmental film festival in the United States. Join Festival Executive Director Stephanie Flack and Programmer Brad Forder for a sneak peek at some of the most exciting new films to be shown during the 23rd annual festival, which will include more than 110 programs at more than 60 venues across the region.

animal planet saving africa's giants

- TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 at 7 pm -
Animal Planet's Saving Africa's Giants with Yao Ming
Erin Wanner, Animal Planet's Senior Director of Production and Executive Producer, reveals the back story into the production, marketing, press, and outreach for Animal Planet's 2014 special, Saving Africa's Giants with Yao Ming. 

A.Heydlauff shooting film with Young Lion Guardians

Photo credit Philip J. Briggs

 - TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24 at 7 pm –PART OF SOC WEEK
Call of the Lion: Wildlife Films Told Through the Eyes of Local People
Panthera's Senior VP Andrea Heydlauff believes one way to engage your most important audience is to stick them in a film. While Panthera is dedicated to saving big cats around the globe, Andrea says that 95% of the work they do involves people. Join her to watch two short films she's written and produced that tell the story of saving cats, told through the eyes of the people who live with them, and who may be their greatest hope for survival.

 

 

Note: The March 20-28 events below are all part of Washington D.C.'s Environmental Film Festival.




Doeville

Photo credit Philip J. Briggs

- FRIDAY, MARCH 20 at 7 pm –
Kathryn Pasternak's Latest Film DOEVILLE (USA, 2015, 92 min.)
Gail Rose struggles to keep a promise made to her late husband Alex—to keep his beloved farm alive—in the heart of Virginia's beautiful Shenandoah Valley. On Deauville Fallow Deer Farm, Rose, a master gardener and animal lover, nurtures about 80 fallow deer, over 150 heritage-breed chickens, lush organic vegetable gardens and a fruit tree orchard. The film follows her journey, full of spirit, determination, courage, humor and hard work. Directed and produced by Kathryn Pasternak. Discussion with filmmaker Kathryn Pasternak follows screening, moderated by Chris Palmer.

chris palmer

- TUESDAY, MARCH 24 at 7 pm –
Reception at 6:30 pm.
An Evening with Chris Palmer-Confessions of a Wildlife Filmmaker
Film producer Chris Palmer's provocative and newly published memoir, Confessions of a Wildlife Filmmaker: The Challenges of Staying Honest in an Industry Where Ratings are King, challenges broadcasters to raise their game. Illustrating his remarks with compelling clips, Professor Palmer will provide a thought-provoking perspective on wildlife filmmaking. His new book will be available for signing and purchase following his presentation. He will also screen the winners of this year's Eco-Comedy Video Competition, co-sponsored by AU's Center for Environmental Filmmaking and The Nature Conservancy. Dr. Elizabeth Gray, Director of The Nature Conservancy's MD/DC Chapter, will co-present the awards with Professor Palmer. 

Rhino

-WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25 at 7 pm -
Student Short Environmental Film Festival
A number of short student films (on climate disruption, wildlife poaching, the illicit trade in rhino horn, and other topics) will be shown followed by a panel discussion with the filmmakers on the opportunities and challenges of environmental filmmaking. The panel will be moderated by Chris Palmer and Sandy Cannon-Brown, and include student filmmakers Jamey Warner, Vanina Harel, and others. Senior Video Producer Melissa Thompson from Greenpeace will also announce the winner of its student film competition and show the winning entry.

 

Environmental Film Festival

- THURSDAY, MARCH 26 at 7 pm -
OK, I've Watched the Film, Now What? Impact Filmmaking Panel

Film clips and panel discussion, hosted and moderated by Chris Palmer, featuring Jody Arlington, Co-founder, Impact Arts + Film Fund;Jon Fitzgerald, Founder and CEO, CineCause;Sheila Leddy, Executive Director, The Fledgling Fund and James Redford, Co-Founder and Chair of the Redford Center and director of Happening. How do we produce films that make a difference? This session, illustrated with clips of inspiring films, explores ways we can turn films into action, at both policy and personal levels. Our panelists consider the challenges of producing and distributing films that have a tangible and measurable impact on their audiences and society.

 

The Leopard in the Land

- FRIDAY, MARCH 27 at 7 pm -
The Leopard in the Land (USA/Mongolia, 2014, 58 min.)

Washington, D.C. Premiere Artist and Disney designer Joe Rohde sets out on a month-long horseback expedition across the Altai Mountains of western Mongolia with the intention of painting large-scale landscapes to raise funds for Snow Leopard conservation. Facing blizzards, rebellious camels and the rapidly approaching Mongolian winter, Rohde's pilgrimage explores why we travel, how we interact with the world, and the monumental effect that has on everything else—including the elusive and enigmatic snow leopard. Directed by James McEachen. Produced by James McEachen, Joe Rohde, and Jalsa Urubshurow. Discussion with filmmaker James McEachen and Joe Rohde, subject of the film, follows screening, hosted and moderated by Chris Palmer.

 

CV villages

- SATURDAY, MARCH 28 at 5 pm -
Of Oysters and Watermen: A Chesapeake Bay Program

CHESAPEAKE VILLAGES (USA, 2015, 30 min.)
World Premiere As one of the important centers of the U.S. seafood industry, the Chesapeake Bay has for centuries supported watermen, businesses and communities all along its shores. But catches of Chesapeake seafood are down, mostly due to poor water quality, and some bayside towns now face an uncertain future. Chesapeake Villages tells the stories of three such villages and their residents: Deal Island, Crisfield, and Hoopers Island. Produced by Vanina Harel, Shayna Muller, Nick Zachar, and their colleagues, and by American University's Center for Environmental Filmmaking, in association with Maryland Public Television.

 

Add one back

ADD ONE BACK (USA, 2014, 17 min.) World Premiere Tells the story of why one vegetarian decides to add aquaculture oysters to his diet. The foundation of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem, oyster populations total less than one percent of historic numbers. Aquaculture oysters play a key role in filtering the Bay's nutrient, sediment and pollution. Supporting this unique local industry and its commitment to Chesapeake conservation became a no-brainer! Written and directed by Sam Sheline. 



Panel discussion, hosted by Professor Chris Palmer, follows screenings. Panelists include student filmmakers for both films and Professor Mike English, who taught the Center for Environmental Filmmaking class where Chesapeake Villages was produced for Maryland Public Television.

Farming for the Future

- SATURDAY, MARCH 28 at 7 pm -
Reception at 6:00 p.m.

Farming for the Future –Enduring Traditions, Innovative Practices

This program of short films and panel discussion will illustrate how farmers and communities are expanding their farming traditions and practices and preserving farmland to meet the demands for sustainable, locally grown food while ensuring that farming remains a profitable career.


FARMING FOR THE FUTURE (USA, 2013, 7 min.)
Cliff Miller of Mount Vernon Farm in the Virginia Piedmont is trying innovative management techniques to sustain his farm for future generations. Cliff's story is that of many farmers seeking new ways to be economically and environmentally sustainable. Directed by Aditi Desai in conjunction with AU's Center for Environmental Filmmaking and the Prince Charitable Trusts.


50 YEARS OF FARMING: FOR LOVE & VEGETABLES (USA, 2014, 10 min.)
The story of Potomac Vegetable Farms, an organic farm in Virginia. Directed by Aditi Desai. Produced by Vanina Harel, in conjunction with AU's Center for Environmental Filmmaking and the Prince Charitable Trusts.


GROWING LEGACY (USA, 2014, 6 min.)
The most successful farm protection effort in the country is 20 miles from the White House. This short film profiles the challenges of growing food and cities in harmony. Produced by Montgomery Countryside Alliance.


SOIL CARBON COWBOY (USA, 2013, 12 min.)
Washington, D.C. Premiere Meet Allen Williams, Gabe Brown and Neil Dennis - heroes and innovators! These ranchers now know how to regenerate their soils while making their animals healthier and their operations more profitable. They are turning ON their soils, enabling rainwater to sink into the earth rather than run off. And these turned ON soils retain that water, so the ranches are much more resilient in drought. Directed and produced by Peter Byck. Panel discussion follows screenings. Host and Moderator: Chris Palmer, with panelists: Film and Multimedia Producer Aditi Desai;filmmaker Vanina Harel;Bill Howard, Executive Director, Downstream Project;Chris Miller, President, Piedmont Environmental Council;Hana &Hiu Newcomb and Ellen Polishuk, Co-Owners, Potomac Vegetable Farms;Kristin Pauly, Managing Director, Prince Charitable Trusts and Caroline Taylor, Executive Director, Montgomery Countryside Alliance.

 

CV villages

- TUESDAY, MARCH 31 at 7 pm -
Chesapeake Villages
This documentary—conceived, written, produced, shot, directed, and edited by students in Environmental & Wildlife Production (COMM 568)—will air during Maryland Public Television's Chesapeake Bay Week in April. The Chesapeake Bay has for centuries supported watermen, businesses and communities all along its shores. But catches of Chesapeake seafood are down, mostly due to poor water quality, and some bayside towns now face an uncertain future. Chesapeake Villages tells the stories of three such villages and their residents: Deal Island, Crisfield, and Hoopers Island. Produced by Vanina Harel, Shayna Muller, Nick Zachar, and their colleagues, and by American University's Center for Environmental Filmmaking, in association with Maryland Public Television. Panel discussion, hosted by Professor Chris Palmer, follows screenings. Panelists include student filmmakers and Professor Mike English, who taught the Center for Environmental Filmmaking class where Chesapeake Villages was produced for Maryland Public Television.