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Investigative

WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH THE INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM SPECIALTY?

Students who specialize in investigative journalism will learn the skills necessary to become top investigative reporters and editors across all media platforms. These skills include learning to undertake solid, accurate reporting, to write clearly and concisely, and to create and organize long narrative and investigative stories, whether in print or video. Students also gain a strong foundation in journalism law and ethics. The skills learned in the investigative reporting specialty are applicable to anyone who wants to communicate with the public for a living. Careers can include writing and editing for magazines, newspapers, trade publications, web sites, and private and non-profit organizations.

Students in the investigative journalism specialty will learn from Pulitzer Prize-winning professors, including faculty who work at SOC’s Investigative Reporting Workshop, founded and directed by former 60 Minutes producer Charles Lewis. Some students may be selected as graduate fellows with The Washington Post, the Center for Public Integrity and Bloomberg/BNA.

COURSES

COMM-500: Investigative Journalism Practicum

This course will involve students working in groups on long-form investigative projects with The Washington Post and other organizations and institutions, which work as partners with the school. Students will demonstrate high-level research and journalistic skills while completing in-depth projects. Prerequisite: admission to the journalism program and permission of the division director.

COMM-607: International Investigative Journalism

This course dives into the history and trends in international investigative reporting, where journalists are uncovering government and corporate corruption, human rights abuses, environmental degradation, and threats to health and safety. Students learn investigative techniques and complete a semester-long project. Prerequisite: admission to graduate journalism program or permission of the division director. 

COMM-501: Data Driven Journalism

This course reviews the history and trends in computer-assisted reporting. The course provides students with basic skills in using spreadsheets, databases, programming, and data visualization in a journalistic context. Prerequisite: admission to the journalism program and permission of the division director.

COMM-502: In-Depth Journalism

Introduces students to the history, purposes, power, and responsibilities of investigative journalism. Also introduces students to the specialized reporting and interviewing techniques of investigative reporting and requires students to develop these skills while participating in a group investigative journalism project. Prerequisite: admission to graduate journalism program or permission of the division director.