newsId: 26F9EA44-5056-AF26-BEB0A786FFD08360
Title: Select Stream-able Selections
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Abstract: When it is chilly outside and you need a break from your studies, check out our streaming content that you can enjoy from the comfort of your room. If you are snowed in, look to the Library’s streaming and online services to cure your cabin fever.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 01/29/2015
Content:

When it is chilly outside and you need to take a break from your studies, check out our streaming content that you can enjoy from the comfort of your own dorm room. If you find yourself snowed in and bored, then look to the Library's streaming and online services for books, films, and music to cure your cabin fever.

Books:

Winter is the perfect time to sit down in a big comfy chair by a fire (or space heater), sip some hot cocoa, and catch up on a couple of those great literary classics you've been meaning to get around to but just haven't had the time. This is just a small selection of the numerous titles available online.

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens [http://bit.ly/1ulgrHB]

Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley [http://bit.ly/14n6PSX]

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain [http://bit.ly/1wzv72p]

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells [http://bit.ly/1tRvC6f]

Some electronic resources are spinoffs from literary favorites, such as the …and Philosophy series.

Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts edited by David Baggett and Shawn E. Klein [http://bit.ly/1xzHoHk]

The Hobbit and Philosophy: For When You've Lost Your Dwarves, Your Wizard, and Your Way edited by Gregory Bassham and Eric Bronson [http://bit.ly/14n9yvm]

The Catcher in the Rye and Philosophy: A Book for Bastards, Morons, and Madmen edited by Keith Dromm and Heather Salter [http://bit.ly/1GXeGFE]

Films:

Find more streaming videos in the numerous Media Service collections but here are some highlights not available on Netflix streaming.

It's a Wonderful Life (1946) [http://bit.ly/116UIaB]
This film originally bombed when it was released, making it cheap for TV stations to play during the holiday season and solidifying it as the Christmas classic we know today.

The Stranger (1946) [http://bit.ly/1ub7yid]
Directed by Orson Welles, this film follows a man of the War Crimes Commission seeking Franz Kindler, mastermind of the Holocaust, who has effectively erased his identity.

Sherlock Holmes in Washington (1942) [http://bit.ly/116VwMI]
You won't find Benedict Cumberbatch or Martin Freeman in this William Roy Neill directed film, but you will find a lot of classic local scenery as Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson travel to Washington D.C. in order to prevent a secret document from falling into enemy hands.

Music:

With Pandora, Spotify, and iTunes Radio, you have a lot of ways to listen to music. Why not explore a few different genres of ad-free music brought to you by the music library?

Jazz Library [http://bit.ly/1ulLxii]
Mix selection of Jazz legends and contemporary jazz.

American Song Library [http://bit.ly/1vdPiYq]
Music from America's past including songs by and about American Indians, miners, immigrants, slaves, children, pioneers, and cowboys.

World Music Library [http://bit.ly/1xA0Qnm]
Take your ears on a global trip with sounds from nearly every genre and region of the world.

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Title: Professor’s New Book Unveils Pros and Cons of Reading Onscreen
Author: Rebecca Basu
Subtitle:
Abstract: E-book or print book: Does it matter? According to new research by American University linguistics professor Naomi Baron, depending on the circumstances, the answer is yes.
Topic: Research
Publication Date: 01/23/2015
Content:

E-book or print book: Does it matter? According to new research by American University linguistics professor Naomi Baron, depending on the circumstances, the answer is yes.

For the past 20 years, Baron has been probing how technology shapes the ways we speak and listen, read and write. In her new book, Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World (Oxford University Press), Baron uncovers the advantages and disadvantages of e-reading and makes a case for educators, parents and policy makers to slow down the rush to digitize all reading.

Surveying university students in the United States, Japan, and Germany, Baron found that 92 percent of them found it easiest to concentrate when reading print. Not surprisingly, they were three times as likely to be multitasking when reading onscreen. What’s more, if cost were the same for hardcopy and digital versions, between 75 and 94 percent (depending on the country) favored print, both for school work and when reading for pleasure.

“Millennials’ preference for print may seem paradoxical given that they use so many digital devices in their daily lives,” Baron said. “Educators need to be mindful about the potential consequences of digitizing so much reading. Educators also need to listen to students’ voices rather than assume we know how they prefer to do their reading, and why.”

Conflicts in reading choices

Words Onscreen presents a research-based challenge to the growing move in education from K through college to replace print with digital reading to help the environment and to save money. Among Baron’s findings are that

• Students generally believe that digital screens are more environmentally friendly than paper. Yet some who cite environmental concerns as their reason for reading digitally nonetheless declare a strong preference for print. In reality, digital devices (and the cloud they access) have many negative environmental impacts.

• Students, especially in the U.S., repeatedly complain that they turn to digital textbooks to save money, not because they believe digital reading is the best way to learn.

• Many students report they learn more when they read in print.

• Length of reading matters in choosing between reading onscreen or in print.

In addition to her empirical research, Baron sketches out the modern evolution of reading. New forms of writing and publication (the novel, the magazine, and anthologies) made for new styles of reading. Today, the web propels people into search mode and skimming snippets rather than long reads. Baron, like many experts, is concerned that digital technologies discourage deep, individual, reflective reading.

“If you are reading on a device that has an Internet connection, it’s tempting to break off to send a text message, update social media accounts, or check out restaurant reviews,” Baron says. “These interruptions short-circuit concentration. The vast literature on multitasking documents how much time and mental focus we lose when we keep switching tasks.”

Baron also considers whether the surge in online social reading networks, along with eReader features that share other readers’ highlights, privilege superficial commentary and mechanical agreement, rather than encouraging people to wrestle with authors and their texts individually.

The smell of the pages

Triple-digit growth in eBooks from 2009 to 2011 led many people to believe that digital reading would soon overtake print. However, annual eBook growth has slowed down to the single digits. In Words Onscreen, Baron cites surveys indicating that today’s readers are interested in having multiple reading options available, including print and electronic versions of the same book – one to use at home and the other to access when on the go.

While eBooks are convenient and often less costly, readers don't own e-books the way they own print books, Baron stresses. When surveying students, many enthused about the look and feel of books, their ease of use, and even the smell of pages and bindings.

“Readers talk about the difference between having a collection of titles that are out-of-sight, out-of-mind, versus being able to view on their shelves the books they’ve read, or even having an unread title stare them down,” Baron said.

Though Baron’s point-of-view is cautionary, she recognizes the virtues of both media. The book’s final chapter offers readers pragmatic steps for capitalizing on the best of both formats.

“Digital reading devices will be with us for the long haul,” Baron observes. “It’s important for us as readers, parents, and teachers to capitalize on their very real advantages. But it’s equally vital for us to remember that form should follow function: Some reading is best done in print – just ask the millennials.”

Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World will be available in early February.

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Title: Going Abroad? Meet Pronunciator
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Abstract: The Library now offers Pronunciator—free language-learning software with a host of useful features.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 01/16/2015
Content:

Planning to study abroad and wondering how you're going to going to find time to brush up on your language skills? Looking for a convenient way to structure your study time? Simply love languages and want to try learning a new one? Meet Pronunciator, our new online language-learning tool. Pronunciator offers instruction for 80 languages that can be taken from any of the 50 starting languages. This range of permutations means that a Spanish speaker can learn Chinese, a Thai speaker can learn Russian, or a Japanese speaker can learn German (just to name a few).

Pronunciator focuses on the language of everyday situations, so you can begin with the essentials, like food or transportation, and then build on that foundation at your own pace. With Pronunciator by your side, you'll be able to ask for directions, order a drink, and communicate with your host family in no time!

Pronunciator's free mobile app for iPhone, Android, and Kindle Fire lets you take your lessons with you. It also features thousands of downloadable audio lessons and phrasebooks, so you can access the tools you need—even while you're offline.

One of Pronunciator's most useful features is the real-time pronunciation analysis tool. All you need is a microphone and Pronunciator will help you test your accent. Especially useful If you're learning a tonal language like Chinese, where pitch can completely change the meaning of a word. Use Pronunciator to help you avoid ending up at a book store, when you really want to visit the library.

If you're planning a trip make sure you check out one of their 8-week travel-prep courses. You'll be conversational before you know it. Bon voyage!

Tags: Library,Library Services,New at the Library,University Library,Languages,Center for Language Exploration, Acquisition & Research (CLEAR),Kogod School of Business,Study Abroad,Abroad at AU,AU Abroad,World Languages and Cultures,Language and Area Studies (w/ College of Arts and Sciences),English for Speakers of Other Languages
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Title: Stay Cozy in your Kitchen this Winter
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Abstract: Introducing our new cookbook collection! This collection supports a variety of academic programs, including College Writing, Chemistry, and American Studies—and provides new, fun ideas for your weekend baking extravaganza.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 12/18/2014
Content:

If your list of wintertime essentials includes butter, sugar, and vanilla extract, then our collection of cookbooks might be your new favorite section of the Library! Spend your next snow day warming up the kitchen by whipping up a batch of delicious cookies, cupcakes, or brownies with one of our many baking-focused cookbooks. 

Vintage food photographs are half the fun of Betty Crocker's Cooky Book (TX772 .C76 2002), which includes retro recipes from the 1880s to the 1960s—perfect for your next theme party. Food blog fans can flip through books from Smitten Kitchen (TX714 .P443 2012), Pioneer Woman (TX715.2 .S69 D793 2012 & TX715 .D7785 2009), and Joy the Baker (TX771 .W477 2012). Cake Pops Holidays (TX771 .B336 2012) lets you recreate the irresistibly cute cake-pop creations of Bakerella for Instagram-ready sweets!

The celebrity-obsessed can find cookbooks from Gwyneth Paltrow (TX715 .P184 2011) and Jessica Alba (RA776.9 .A43 2013)—or try out the Banana ba-ba-ba Bread recipe from Cookin' with Coolio (TX714 .C672 2009). You can even test out Oprah’s favorite brownies, featured in Baked: New Frontiers in Baking (TX765 .L67 2008).

And who needs to wait in line at Georgetown Cupcakes, when you can make your own from their cookbooks, Cupcake Diaries (TX771 .K35 2011) and Sweet Celebrations (TX771 .B467 2012)? Our collection also includes cookbooks from other local favorites like CakeLove (TX769 .B838 2012 & TX771 .B8785 2008) and Sticky Fingers (TX837 .P5134 2012).

Special diets are covered too, with selections like Gluten-Free Girl and the Chef (RM237.86 .A338 2010) and Paleo Cooking from Elana's Pantry (RM237.86 .A48 2013).

Happy Baking!

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Title: Featured Database: Met Opera on Demand
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Abstract: Our featured database, Met Opera on Demand offers an extensive catalog of more than 500 performances, all available to watch instantly.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 12/09/2014
Content:

Whether you're a classical music buff looking for something new –or simply curious about opera, the AU Library has your daily dose of drama. From Aida to Die Zauberflöte, Met Opera on Demand offers an extensive catalog of more than 500 performances, all available to watch instantly. Since 2006, the Met has been filming select performances in high-definition (HD), meaning that some of the newer additions are available in this format. You'll be able to catch every detail of those glorious costumes and sets!

All of the Met Opera on Demand videos contain English subtitles, so you won't need to worry about missing any important details. Also, many recent HD additions to the Met Opera on Demand catalog contain subtitles in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish.

See iconic performances such as Wagner's Ring Cycle, without leaving your apartment (or spending hundreds of dollars on a ticket!) This collection includes operatic interpretations of Shakespearean works, like Othello, Romeo and Juliet, and Macbeth, classic productions featuring the famous Luciano Pavarotti, and even contemporary works, such as Doctor Atomic.

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Title: Winter is Coming: Time to Get Cozy with these Titles
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Abstract: This month’s collection highlight article deals with all things winter which means each item has the word “winter” in the title. Bundle up with these cool picks.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 12/04/2014
Content:

This month's collection highlight article deals with all things winter which means each item has the word "winter" in the title. So ironically you won't see Game of Thrones [HU DVD 10021], the inspiration for our title, on this list. So as this semester draws to a close and the nights grow longer and the air becomes colder, make sure to check out one of these books, films, or musical treats.

Books

Captain America: Winter Soldier Ultimate Collection by Ed Brubaker [PN6728.C35 B78 2010]
The comic inspiration for the summer blockbuster hit, this graphic novel delves into the Cold War, using the conflict between Winter Soldier and Captain America as a metaphor for this historical clash of super-powered nations.

The Winter's Tale by William Shakespeare [PR2754 .K5 1966]
This romantic-comedy features a man-eating bear, a disastrous shipwreck, a living statue, and one of Shakespeare's best comic relief characters in "a rogue" named Autolycus. A great treat to get your mind off those finals-blues.

The Long Winter Ends by Newton G. Thomas [http://bit.ly/1xSrRSd]
Thomas tells the story of a year in the life of a young immigrant miner who leaves Cornwall in the southwest of England to work in the copper mines of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. This novel offers a glimpse into the lives of an often neglected immigrant group that played an important role in the development of the Great Lake and American mining industries.   

The Winter of Our Discontent by John Steinbeck [PS3537.T3234 W5]
Set in Steinbeck's contemporary 1960 America, the novel explores the tenuous line between private and public honesty, offering penetrating insight into the American condition.

Bonus Winter Treat
Anything by Robert Frost [PS3511.R94 A17 1930] perfectly complements a peppermint mocha latte or fireplace snuggle. 

Films

Captain America: Winter Soldier [HU DVD 11478]
Playing on the fears of government surveillance, this Washington, D.C. centered, action-packed superhero political thriller will keep you warm on even the coldest winter days.

Winter's Bone [HU DVD 7696]
Jennifer Lawrence stars in this movie about an unflinching mountain girl who hunts down her drug-dealing father. This film will chill you to the bone.

Bonus Winter Treat
Fargo [HU DVD 2393] The iconic shot of bright red blood stains on the snow in this hit Coen Brothers film might just send shivers down your spine.

Music

"A Hazy Shade of Winter" by Simon and Garfunkel [http://bit.ly/1xBZitQ

"Winter Wonderland"
Give your Spotify and Pandora stations a rest and listen to this American classic covered in genres such as country [http://bit.ly/1zmXFj4], Jazz [http://bit.ly/1ugTBAK], [http://bit.ly/113mzIx], [http://bit.ly/14iLIRs], [http://bit.ly/113mHrA], Hawai'ian [http://bit.ly/1zmXYu6], [http://bit.ly/1v8YwoJ], Rock [http://bit.ly/1v8YwoJ], and Hip-Hop Remix [http://bit.ly/1ugUhGv]

"Winter" by The Rolling Stones [Rolling Stones COC 59101]

Vivaldi [http://bit.ly/14iMDRZ]
Add some class to your winter break with these violin concertos.

"Winter" by Tori Amos [Compact Disc 9727]

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Title: Be Thankful for: Music, Movies, and Books
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Abstract: This article highlights a small collection of books, videos, and music which attempt to discover the truth about the Pilgrims, the Mayflower, and that harvest nearly 400 years ago.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 11/25/2014
Content:

As the leaves begin to turn and pumpkin spice lattes flow, we remember to give thanks with our friends, families, and loved ones. But what is the origin of this tradition? Cemented into American culture by Abraham Lincoln and FDR, the history of Thanksgiving is rife with controversy. Here is but a small collection of books, videos, and music which attempt to discover the truth about the Pilgrims, the Mayflower, and that harvest nearly 400 years ago.

Books:

A Great & Godly Adventure: The Pilgrims & The Myth of the First Thanksgiving by Godfrey Hodgson [F68 .H69 2006]
A rich work throwing new light on the radicalism of the so-called Pilgrims, the financing of their trip, the state of the American Indian tribes that they encountered when they landed, and the reasons why Plymouth probably didn't actually have a rock.

Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War by Nathaniel Philbrick [F68 .P44 2006]
This book chronicles the history of the ship that carried the Pilgrims across the sea. From construction to decommission, the storied tale of this monumental ship carries immense bravery and the terrible fury of war.

The Times Of Their Lives: Life, Love, And Death In Plymouth Colony by James Deetz and Patricia Scott Deetz [F68 .D4 2000]
Beginning with an eyewitness account of the first Thanksgiving, this book paints a startling portrait of Plymouth Colony that includes aspects of the legal system, folk beliefs, family life, women’s roles and gender issues, eating habits, alcohol use, sexual misconduct, domestic violence, suspicious deaths, and violent crimes.

Cooking In America, 1590–1840 by Trudy Eden [http://bit.ly/1vibvTH]
Cook your own traditional Thanksgiving dinner (possum stew anyone?) with this cookbook that uses authentic colonial writings to detail what and how American Indians ate in Colonial times and a look at European immigrants cooking evolved into American cooking. 

America's Hidden History: Untold Tales Of The First Pilgrims, Fighting Women, And Forgotten Founders Who Shaped A Nation by Kenneth C. Davis. [E178 .D39 2008]
An iconoclastic look at America’s past, spanning a period from the Spanish arrival in America to George Washington’s inauguration in 1789, with little-known but fascinating, myth-busting facts.

Films:

While there is a plethora of fictional films centered on Thanksgiving, these selections offer opposing views of the fateful landing.

Desperate Crossing: The Untold Story of the Mayflower [http://bit.ly/1zdtbni]
A story bearing little resemblance to the popular myth, this A&E special tracks the incredible voyage that landed an unlikely band of pioneers on the inhospitable shores of what would come to be known as New England.

After The Mayflower: We Shall Remain—America Through Native Eyes [http://bit.ly/1wbwmq2]
Part of a larger series, this episode begins in March of 1621, in what is now southeastern Massachusetts, when the leading sachem of the Wampanoag negotiated with a ragged group of English colonists. What followed half a century later was a war that never ended. An alternative look at a controversial time in America.

Music:

While Christmas is known for its traditional song selection, Thanksgiving is not without its own share. Reflect on the music that shaped the times and inspired the deeds of early Americans.

An Anthem (Designed For Thanksgiving Day. But Proper For Any Publick Occasion) by William Cooper (1792) [http://bit.ly/1wMSPd8]
One of the oldest songs in the collection this anthem captures the spirit of Americana at the birth of this nation.

Canon And Fugue in D Minor (No. 4 Of New England Holidays) by Wallingford Riegger (1941) [Composers Recordings 177]
A song composed around the time when Thanksgiving was declared an official holiday by FDR.

Thanksgiving Suite by Charles Callahan (1988) [M13.C254 op.52 1988]
A modern organ hymn in the style of traditional hymnals.

Early American Anthems [M2 .R2375 v.36]
A cornucopia of traditional Thanksgiving songs from Early America

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Title: Food for Fines at the AU Library
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Abstract: This article details the Food for Fines program, which allows patrons to pay their Library fines with donated food. These food donations go to the Capital Area Food Bank.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 11/21/2014
Content:

For more than fifteen years, the Library has partnered with the AU community to provide canned and other food for those in need, while giving you a break on your library fines. This year we are partnering with Capital Area Food Bank's Back Pack Program.

As Capital Area Food Bank explains on their website: "The Capital Area Food Bank is the hub for food sourcing, food distribution and nutrition education in the Washington metro area, serving those struggling with hunger. In Washington, DC and its six surrounding counties, there are nearly 700,000 individuals at risk of hunger, of which nearly 150,000 are children."

You can pay up to $20.00 of your AU fines with donated food. The Food for Fines offer does not extend to other consortium libraries. Food for Fines ends on Monday, December 23, so take advantage of this opportunity while you *ahem* can.

As you select your donation, please consider the healthfulness of the food items. The items that you donate through Food for Fines help to provide vital nutrition for a food insecure population in the DC area. The families and individuals who receive assistance from CAFB rely on them for healthy, nutritious ingredients and meals.

The list below details what food items will be accepted for this program, and please note that the Capitol Area Food Bank has specifically requested low sodium items. You may also request a copy of this list in-person at our Borrowing Desk or by contacting the Borrowing Desk by email, circulation@american.edu, or phone 202-885-3221.

Food for Fines items accepted in 2014:

CANNED FOOD

  • Canned fruits (without corn syrup)—8oz or larger 1 can = $1.00 off fines
  • Canned vegetables—8oz or larger 1 can = $1.00 off fines
  • Canned beans (black or kidney)—8oz or larger 1 can = $1.00 off fines
  • Soup (especially chicken noodle or tomato)—8oz or larger 1 can = $1.00 off fines
  • Canned tuna—6oz or larger 1 can = $1.00 off fines
  • Canned chicken—6oz or larger 1 can = $1.00 off fines

BOXED/DRY FOOD

  • Boxed rice dishes—1 box 7 oz or larger = $1.00 off fines
  • Plain rice—1 bag 32 oz or larger $1.00 off fines
  • Boxed mac and cheese—1 box 7.25 oz or larger = $1.00 off fines
  • Granola or cereal bars—1 box 6ct or more = 4.00 off fines
  • Single Serving Snacks—1 box 8ct or more = $4.00 off fines
  • Peanut butter (no hydrogenated oils/trans fats)—1 jar 18oz or larger = $4.00 off fines
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Title: Win A Prize for Outstanding Research! Enter a Paper or Project in the Annual AU Library Research Competition
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Abstract: The University Library Research Prize recognizes AU undergraduate students who make extensive use of the Library’s collections and show excellence in critical analysis by locating, selecting, evaluating, and synthesizing information.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 11/12/2014
Content:

AU Library is offering two prizes for outstanding Undergraduate Research papers or projects prepared during 2014: one for the Best College Writing Research Paper or Project and one for the Best Undergraduate Research Paper or Project. A prize of $1,000 will be awarded in each category. Papers and projects prepared for spring, summer, or fall 2014 AU courses will be accepted for consideration. 

Submission Dates and Prizes

Beginning January 12th, the University Library will begin accepting application for two prizes for high quality undergraduate research papers or projects:

  • University Library Prize for Best College Writing Research Paper or Project
  • University Library Prize for Best Undergraduate Research Paper or Project

One prize of $1,000 will be awarded in each category. The deadline for submission is 12:00 midnight, March 20, 2015.

Purpose

The purpose of the prize is to recognize and award American University undergraduate students who make extensive use of the University Library's collections and show evidence of critical analysis in their research skills, including locating, selecting, evaluating and synthesizing information.

Eligibility

Students must be currently enrolled as undergraduates at American University. Groups and teams are not eligible.

  • Undergraduate papers or research projects that have been completed for a registered American University course, including study abroad courses, are eligible for consideration for the Best Undergraduate prize. Papers or projects prepared for a College Writing class are eligible for the Best College Writing prize.
  • Papers submitted in Spring, 2014, Summer 2014, and Fall 2014 courses are eligible. Capstone Projects are not eligible for this award.
  • Projects may be in any format as long as the creator can demonstrate significant inquiry in the development of the work that involved use of the library's resources and collections.
  • Papers or projects must be nominated by the professor responsible for the course.

Evaluation criteria

Successful projects will demonstrate:

  • Substantial use of library resources and collections in any format, including but not limited to printed resources, databases, primary resources, and materials in all media;
  • Ability to locate, select, evaluate, and synthesize library resources and to use them in the creation of a project that shows originality and/or has the potential to lead to original research in the future;
  • Evidence of significant personal learning and the development of a habit of research and inquiry that shows the likelihood of persisting in the future;
  • Originality of thought, mastery of content appropriate to class level, clear writing, and a high quality of presentation.

Application Procedure

Applications may be received beginning January 12, 2015.To apply, students must submit the following in electronic form (MS Word documents only, not PDFs) to LibAward@american.edu no later than March 20, 2015.

  1. Completed application cover sheet with student name, title of project, title of course, name of professor, date of submission to competition.
  2. Letter of recommendation from the faculty member who taught the course for which the paper or project was prepared. (Refer faculty to the list of evaluation criteria.)
  3. A brief 500 to 700 word reflective essay describing research strategies, application of library tools and resources in completion of the project.
  4. A bibliography or other listing of sources consulted, if not already included in the paper.
  5. A final version of the project. Written papers should be double spaced and may be of any length. Digital projects should be submitted on a DVD. For other formats, contact LibAward@american.edu

Students may submit more than one paper, but only one award will be granted per individual. Questions about the award, the nomination, or application process, may be sent to librarian Mary Mintz or LibAward@american.edu.

Evaluation Committee

A committee composed of American University faculty from the library, the College Writing program, and other academic units will evaluate submissions.

Recognition

Awardees will be announced in late spring semester and will be honored at a special event on April 28, 2015. First place awardees will receive a certificate and a monetary prize of $1000. Awardees may be acknowledged in library publications and may be recognized at other appropriate university venues such as the Undergraduate Research Fair. Copies of the research papers may be held in the AU Digital Repository.

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Title: Chronicling Your Future
Author: Gregg Sangillo
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Abstract: The new We KNOW Success website shows recent AU grads are finding jobs and pursuing advanced degrees.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 11/07/2014
Content:

Data Driven

What percentage of newly-minted AU alums with biology degrees go to grad school? What proportion of recent international studies graduates end up working in government? What might new alumni with accounting degrees expect to earn?

It's all at your fingertips on American University's new website, We KNOW Success: Where AU Graduates Land. The expansive, illustrative, data-driven site details job and graduate school outcomes, work sector choices, and salary ranges for recent AU graduates.

"It provides prospective students and families with simple, direct, and reliable information on the early outcomes of graduates who earn degrees from AU," says Teresa Flannery, vice president for communication.

The site, which can be found at www.american.edu/weknowsuccess/, chronicles the success of AU students within six months of graduation. We KNOW Success combines data from three recent graduating classes of bachelor's and master's degree students (2011-2013). You can check statistics by school (such as the College of Arts and Sciences or the School of Public Affairs), by major (economics, political science, etc.), or degree (bachelor's and master's, with some information about doctoral degree programs).

For many universities, collecting information on recent graduates yields low response rates and inconclusive results. Yet through assiduous data collection, strong community engagement, and active social media and LinkedIn monitoring, AU has achieved a remarkably high rate of completion for data gathered about the next destination of recent alumni.

"We realized we were sitting on a really powerful resource, in terms of this data," says Flannery. "It's very unusual for a university of our size to have responses from three quarters or more of our graduates at both grad and undergraduate levels. And it seemed responsible to share that information and make it more widely available."

The end result is an illuminating, user-friendly website accessible to the public. The site is the product of an 11-month collaboration by the Career Center, the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment, the Office of Information Technology, and University Communications and Marketing.

"This website fits an existing need in the broader community of people who are considering attending universities like ours," says Gihan Fernando, executive director of the Career Center. "And it allows us to showcase some of the terrific successes that we've had over the years."

Worth the Investment

The overall numbers tell an encouraging story: 88 percent of bachelor's degree holders are working or in graduate school, while 91 percent of master's graduates are employed or pursuing other advanced degrees. Both percentages include people working while attending graduate school. Equally impressive: 85 percent of those who are working hold jobs related to their degree. "The vast majority of our students, in most categories, come out of here with a positive outcome," says Fernando.

With heightened national scrutiny over the value of a college education, these numbers demonstrate that prospective AU students and parents will be getting a strong return on their investment. "It's allowing them to make more informed decisions," adds Flannery.

The World is Your Oyster

The Career Center and other AU offices have paid special attention to students' professional development and job prospects. Fernando says 89 percent of all undergrads do internships while attending AU. This trend greatly enhances the likelihood of a student being employed within six months of graduation.

AU students' most popular internship destinations—such as the State Department and the World Bank—are included on the site. One section comprises short bios of high-achieving recent alums, including Deon Jones (SPA/BA '14), who became the youngest elected official in Washington, D.C. history by winning a seat on the Advisory Neighborhood Commission; and Fanta Aw, who earned her bachelor's, master's, and Ph.D. here and works as AU's assistant vice president of campus life.

We KNOW Success also reveals that AU students are choosing a wide variety of career paths. With AU's traditional emphasis on public service, it's not surprising that nearly half of bachelor's degree recipients chose either non-profit or government work. Yet a full 53 percent of former undergrads surveyed work in the private sector. When examining recent master's degree recipients, the economic sector breakdown is remarkably balanced: 35 percent work at for-profit companies, 32 percent in government, and 31 percent with non-profits.

"From a university perspective, we are not about telling students, 'You should be doing X, Y, or Z.' We're really about trying to help you, from the beginning, identify what your interests are and then help you achieve that," says Fernando. "It's about making good choices for yourself, and doing it with knowledge and information."

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Title: Librarian Profile: Derrick Jefferson
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Abstract: The fifth article in our series of librarian profiles focuses on Communication Librarian Derrick Jefferson. With his experience in filmmaking, photography, and journalism, Derrick has insight into many facets of communication studies.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 11/04/2014
Content:

Derrick Jefferson brings a wealth of expertise to his role as Communication Librarian. Always imaginative, he majored in Creative Writing as an undergraduate at San Diego State University and then moved on to the graduate Film program at the Art Center College of Design, before getting a second graduate degree in Library and Information Sciences at the Louisiana State University. In between all of his academic pursuits, Derrick operated in the film industry in Los Angeles, had a stint as a food photographer, and worked as a journalist. Throughout his life, Derrick's parents instilled in him the value of service work, which led to his first library job as a volunteer at a public library in Burbank, CA. Later on, as a graduate student in New Orleans, Derrick worked to restore local libraries post-Katrina. This restoration work encompassed everything from rebuilding collections to cleaning walls and carpets. Derrick's passion for helping others is also evident through his work here at AU.

Where can you find him?

In addition to offering personal appointments throughout the week and providing support at the Research Assistance Desk, Derrick holds SOC office hours every Monday 1–3pm on the Terrace Level of McKinley. Derrick finds that his experience as an embedded librarian has led to more serendipitous encounters with SOC students and faculty. He is also enthusiastic about nurturing nontraditional students, as a result of his experience in an essentially distance MLIS program. Although he was attracted to the role of technology in librarianship, he found that "as a people person, distance education was very difficult. It can easily result in a sense of disconnection."

In order to combat the difficulties of distance learning, Derrick works to meet with students from night and weekend programs via Skype, Google chat, email, or by phone. "Outreach is so important," he says. "The 'average' college student is continuing to change and I want to be a part of their experience. Any student who is here at AU has worked hard to get into their program and we [librarians] want to see them succeed and will go above and beyond to help that happen."

Why he loves his job

Derrick loves "helping students and pairing people with resources. I love seeing the wheels turn when you connect someone with the articles that can kick start their research." Derrick was thrilled to join the AU community as the Communication Librarian because it married so many of his interests and felt like an ideal fit for a creative, outgoing person. He also enjoys that libraries offer a continuously evolving environment, citing the new game collection as a perfect example of library innovation with collections; "We are not just books anymore;we are so much more than that. We can help researchers navigate the informational waters and find resources that they didn't even know existed."

In the community

Although Derrick is fairly new to AU;he has already gotten deeply involved with campus life. Working with the Ann Ferren Conference on Teaching, Research, and Learning Planning Committee has been especially rewarding: "It's great to be brainstorming and networking with people from all across campus." His work on the Online Learning Advisory Committee allows Derrick to contribute to the improvement of the distance education experience for both students and faculty.

Within the Library, Derrick serves as a co-chair for the External Diversity and Inclusion Committee, examining the role of the Library in fostering equity and acceptance within the AU community. Beyond the AU community, Derrick has just been accepted into the American Library Association Emerging Leader class of 2015. This is a highly visible and competitive program—this year there were more than 200 applications for a class of 50 people.

Derrick brings both organizational and leadership skills to the institution, along with a dedication to service: "Do not be afraid to reach out to us. There are no silly questions, and, if you are wondering about something, there is another person out there with the same question. My door is always open."

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Title: Recycling Electronic Waste at the Library
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Abstract: Bring old computers, mobile devices, and batteries to the Library for recycling.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 10/31/2014
Content:

Goodbye iPhone 5. Less than two years and now it's gone. Sure, it only had an A6 chip instead of an A8, and turning it on took a button push instead of a thumbprint, but perhaps it deserved better than the current fate. Some old devices will be sold for refurbishment, but eventually, like today's iPhone 4, iPod minis, and devices with slide out QWERTY keyboards, iPhone 5s will lose their technological relevance and end up in a landfill.

You can help the AU Library reverse this trend by bringing your discarded electronics in to be recycled. Through a partnership with University Facilities and the Office of Sustainability, the Library collects these items and sends them to recycling centers. The electronic recycling process not only directly helps the environment by preventing dangerous toxins from being added to landfills, but also promotes sustainable resource management. Electronic devices are made with a variety of rare earth-metals such as silver, gold, and palladium. Reclaiming these minerals helps reduce industrial mining operations cutting down on pollution and preserving eco-systems around the world.

How significant is the impact of electronic waste on landfills? Electronic waste makes up five percent of solid waste worldwide—nearly the same amount as plastic packaging. It has become the fastest growing part of the municipal waste stream and continues growing as the lifecycle of computers and phones continues to shrink. Greenpeace reports that Americans replace their computers every two to three years on average, and their cell phones after only 18 months. According to the EPA, only one percent of these discarded electronics are recycled, which means more than 135 million mobile devices are thrown away each year.

Check the list below to see what devices can be recycled, and then bring unwanted items to the Course Reserves and Technology Borrowing Desk on the lower level of Bender Library. If you have other electronics not listed below, contact the Information Desk. Library staff will be happy to help find the most eco-friendly waste disposal option. It's a chance to clear out your junk and help the University in its commitment to send zero waste to landfills and incineration by 2020.

  • Computers and Laptops
  • Consumer Electronics: iPods, Walkman, GPS, Digital Cameras, Video Cameras
  • Cellular Phones, Pagers, iPhones, Blackberry
  • Network Equipment: Routers, Switches, Hubs, Modems
  • Printers, Typewriters, Fax Machines, Scanners
  • New or Used Toner and Ink Cartridges
  • Peripherals: Mice, Keyboards, Wires, Power Strips, Network Cables
  • Power Supplies, AC Adapters
  • Flat Panel Monitors, LCDs, LCD TVs, Plasma, LED, Flat Panel
  • Audio Equipment: Speakers, Stereo Equipment, Turntables
  • VCRs, DVD Players, BlueRay Players, Cable Boxes, Tivo, DVR, Satellite Receivers
  • RF, Radio, and Ham Radio Parts
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Title: Secret Lives: Christina Floriza
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Abstract: Our third Personnel Profile story highlights RTL Technology Coordinator Christina Floriza and her secret life in the world of improv comedy.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 10/28/2014
Content:

As the Technology Coordinator for Research, Teaching, and Learning Services at the AU Library, Christina Floriza focuses on making instruction more accessible. In addition to creating tutorials and guides for digital resources to support instruction, Christina offers research assistance to library patrons, co-chairs the Internal Library Diversity and Inclusion Committee, and serves on both the Green Team and the Social Media Taskforce.

In her work, Christina is always ready to innovate and find new venues for reaching her audience. This past summer, she collaborated on a series of instructional Instagram videos, condensing her message to fit a platform that is popular with student users. She credits her improv work with inspiring her to look for new approaches to digital learning objects.

"Improv looks unstructured, but isn't at all—there are tons of rules and a formula that must be applied, right down to the structure of a joke. Creating tutorials is similar. You find a formula that holds the interest of the user and develop a structure for explaining something succinctly."

Christina discovered improv comedy more than a year ago, when she signed up for a free workshop at the Washington Improv Theater also known as WIT (wink, wink). Although she has a background in the performing arts, from aria competitions to productions of the Vagina Monologues during her undergrad years, this was Christina's first venture into the world of improv. Fast forward to today and Christina is performing regularly with local troupes at festivals and events such as DC's Improvapalooza.

Her connection to this creative community has been rewarding: "Improv comedy in DC is a nurturing, supportive, and stress-free environment full of kind people. The basic tenets of improv are agreement and support—you agree with the premise and add something extra. You don't look for the conflict in a situation; you look for what is interesting, and you find it by supporting your partner."

Through her exploration of improv, Christina has gleaned insights that can be applied to the rest of her life. She has learned how to stay grounded, become more open-minded, and approach situations by observing things first. She also stresses the approachability of improv, insisting that anyone can do it, as long as they come into it with an open mind. For anyone interested in giving it a shot, Christina offers some advice: "Never try to be funny, just be real and authentic. If the scene doesn't feel funny at first, don't worry. You'll find the quirk and humor as you go."

To see local improv in action, she recommends the Monday night Improv Wars at Mead Theater Lab; Comedy Spot, a club that offers a range of improv shows with different audiences in mind; or dropping by WIT on Tuesday nights at 9pm for a pair of free performances by their house teams followed by a free workshop and jam session.

Book Recommendations from Christina:

The Second City Almanac of Improvisation by Anne Libera, PN2071 .I5 S43 2004
"Second city is a big improv hub in the US and is where both Tina Fey and Rachel Dratch got started. This book offers a fun, very digestible how-to breakdown of the Chicago style, written by alums."

Guru: My Days with Del Close by Jeff Griggs, PN2287 .C5465 G75 2005
"This book chronicles the author's experiences with Del Close, considered the father of long-form improv, as a mentor, person, and performer. It also shows the evolution of the idea of improv into something teachable."

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Title: Celebrate LGBTQ History Month with These Library Selections
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Abstract: October is LGBTQ History Month and to celebrate we have highlighted some of the best LGBTQ books, films, and CDs in our collection.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 10/21/2014
Content:

October is LGBTQ History Month and to celebrate we have highlighted some of the best LGBTQ books, films, and CDs in our collection. The Gender and Sexuality Library at the Center for Diversity &Inclusion in Mary Graydon Center Room 201 is another excellent source for more LGBTQ related materials. Items from the Gender and Sexuality Library can be checked out just like books and movies at the Bender Library.

 

Books

A Queer History of the United States by Michael Bronski (HQ76.3 .U5 B696 2011)
The first book to cover the entirety of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender history, from pre-1492 to the present.

The Gay Metropolis by Charles Kaiser (HQ76.3 .U52 N486 1997)
This collection of anecdotes is both serious and gossipy when it comes to chronicling gay life in New York City-and America-since 1945.

From "Perverts" to "Fab Five" by Rodger Streitmatter (HQ76.2 .U5 S87 2009)
This book, by an SOC professor, tracks the dramatic change in how the American media has depicted gay people. While the media has reflected the American public's shift to a more enlightened view of gay people, it has also been an instrumental player in propelling that change.

Lost Prophet by John D'Emilio (E185.97 .R93 D46 2003)
Bayard Rustin taught Martin Luther King Jr. the methods of Gandhi, spearheaded the 1963 March on Washington, and helped bring the struggle of African Americans to the forefront of a nation's consciousness. However, despite his incontrovertibly integral role in the movement, the openly gay Rustin is not the household name that many of his activist contemporaries are. Acclaimed historian John D'Emilio explains why Rustin's influence was minimized by his peers and why his brilliant strategies were not followed, or were followed by those he never meant to help.

Lives of Transgender People by Genny Beemyn and Susan Rankin (CDI Gender and Sexuality Library, MGC 201 HQ77.95 .U6 B44 2011)
A survey of nearly 3,500 participants on gender development and identity-making among transgender and genderqueer individuals. With more than 400 follow-up interviews, the quantitative and qualitative data offers a powerful glimpse into the lives of transgender people.

Out in the Country by Mary L. Gray (CDI Gender and Sexuality Library, MGC 201 HQ76.27 .Y68 G73 2009)
From Wal-Mart drag parties to renegade Homemaker's Clubs, Out in the Country offers an unprecedented contemporary account of the lives of today's rural queer youth.

Nobody Passes edited by Mattilda (CDI Gender and Sexuality Library, MGC 201 HQ77.9 .N64 2006)
A collection of essays that confronts and challenges the very notion of belonging. By examining the perilous intersections of identity, categorization, and community, contributors challenge societal mores and countercultural norms.

Bi Any Other Name edited by Loraine Hutchins and Lani Kaahumanu (HQ74 .B5 1991)
In this groundbreaking anthology, more than seventy women and men from all walks of life describe their lives as bisexuals in prose, poetry, art, and essays

Films

Paris is Burning (Hone Use DVD 1650)
A documentary chronicling New York's drag scene in the 1980s, focusing on balls, voguing and the ambitions and dreams of those who gave the era its warmth and vitality.

Milk (CDI Gender and Sexuality Library, MGC 201 M)
The story of Harvey Milk, and his struggles as an American gay activist who fought for gay rights and became California's first openly gay elected official.

Boys Don't Cry (CDI Gender and Sexuality Library, MGC 201 B)
The story of a young transgender person named Brandon Teena who moves to a small town in Nebraska in the early 1990's.

Aimee and Jaguar (CDI Gender and Sexuality Library, MGC 201 A)
A German Film based off of the true story of two women who fell deeply in love in Berlin during World War II. One is a model Nazi wife and the other a Jewish member of the underground resistance movement.

Music

Make sure to stop by the Music Library in Katzen to check out our massive collection of LGBTQ musicians from Elton John to Queen to musicals like Priscilla Queen of the Desert (DC 9087) and Kinky Boots (CDE 10203). 

And for more academic research, make sure to check out 5 LGBT Resources at the AU Library.

Special thanks to Matthew Bruno at the Center for Diversity & Inclusion for the recommendations.

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Title: Leading-Edge Learning Spaces—the Geospatial Research Lab and Idea Space
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Abstract: Learn more about the new Geospatial Research Lab and Idea Space, a joint venture between Academic Technology and Research, Teaching, and Learning located in the Anderson Computer Complex.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 10/17/2014
Content:

During Summer 2014 the Library was busy constructing a new space and team to enhance our support for faculty in the areas of geospatial research and instructional technology. The new lab is located in the Anderson Computer Complex. The room features 6 desktop computers, one 70 inch monitor, two 42 inch monitors and a projector with wireless projection capabilities. The tables and some walls feature dry erase paint, allowing users collaborate freely around the room.

On the green side of this space, the Geospatial Research Lab will support the research and teaching programs of the university using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technologies and resources. The lab will help build and curate American University's spatial data collection and provide services in support of robust geospatial research. The lab will support AU scholars who work in fields that have not historically used geospatial analysis as they explore how geographic visualization can assist them in examining relationships and causalities, uncovering patterns, and making predictions.

The blue side is the Idea Space, an instructional technology training lab, which creates a designated space for faculty classroom technology training. Maintained by the University's Audio Visual (AV) Services group, the Idea Space will contain mock classroom arrangements, experimental classroom configurations, and a collection of new technologies allowing faculty to test out new devices or practice integrating new technology into the classroom. With this space, AV Services can also provide one-on-one training for faculty members specific to the University's classroom technology.

Join the grand opening celebration, tour the lab, and meet the coordinators on October 21, 2014 from 3–4:30pm. The lab is located in the Anderson Computer Complex, room B-16 and is available by appointment starting October 22, 2014. For GIS users contact Meagan Snow at msnow@american.edu. For instructional technology contact Katie Kassof at katiek@american.edu. For audio visual training contact av@american.edu.

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Title: Game On!
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Abstract: Explore our new games collection at the Course Reserves and Technology Borrowing Desk.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 10/09/2014
Content:

Need a break from the endless schedule of classes and studying? Hunting for ways to have fun on campus while still saving money? Look no further than the AU Library. The Course Reserves and Technology Borrowing desk on the Lower Level of the Library now has a wide-ranging collection of games available for a 3 day check-out. Our extensive collection (more than 90 titles) includes everything from classics, such as Twister (AUGAME 13–14), Monopoly (AUGAME 73–76), and Risk (AUGAME 22), to more recent table top, computer, and video games. Below are just a few standouts from our collection:

  1. The game that arguably started the recent table top trend, Settlers of Catan (AUGAME 03) pits you against your friends in a race to colonize the island of Catan. While creating roads, settlements, and cities with your collected resources, you must also effectively block your opponents from building across the board.
  2. In the board game Pandemic (AUGAME 08), players work cooperatively instead of competitively. With each player in a randomly selected role, they must work together to stop the spread of four diseases in separate regions of the world. The Pandemic: On The Brink (AUGAME 07) and Pandemic: In The Lab (AUGAME 09) expansion sets are also available for checkout.
  3. Playstation 2’s Katamari Damacy (AUGAME 32) is a zany puzzle game where, as the Prince of the Cosmos, you must roll a magical, adhesive ball through various locations, collecting increasingly larger objects (thumbtacks, pets, cars, people, mountains) until the ball has grown great enough to become a star.
  4. Which was invented first: glasses or the light bulb? Test your knowledge of the recent past with Timeline (AUGAME 90), a fun and easy card game about inventions and historical accuracy.
  5. Distant Plain: Insurgency in Afghanistan (AUGAME 51) is a unique strategy game developed from recent news headlines. Players represent either insurgent or counterinsurgent factions in modern-day Afghanistan, where they must build and maneuver forces to effectively control the population.
  6. Test your card-playing skills with Dominion (AUGAME 16), a medieval-themed game where 2–4 players compete to gain the most victory points and build a valuable deck of cards.

Check out the Board Games board on our Pinterest page to explore all current titles in our collection, as well as to see their availability. If you find a game you like, just drop by the desk on the Lower Level of the Library. Because the games are kept behind the Reserves and Technology Borrowing Desk, it is important to have not only your AU ID, but also the call number of the game. All games are available for a 3-day loan with no renewals. Games must be returned directly to the Course Reserves desk; if the desk is closed, they may also be returned to the Information Desk on the first floor. Games should not be returned to the front book drop or the Borrowing Desk. Overdue fines are $1 per day. 

For more information on the Library’s games collection, you can go to the Course Reserves and Technology Borrowing desk. You can also contact us by calling 202-882-3231 or e-mailing reserves@american.edu.

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Title: Database of the Month: DSM Online
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Abstract: October’s Database of the Month feature showcases the DSM Online, a critical resource for anyone studying psychological disorders.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 10/03/2014
Content:

In 2013, the American Psychiatric Association updated the definitive Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the first major revision to the manual since 2000. The DSM is a critical resource for anyone studying psychology disorders, and DSM Online can be searched by keyword or browsed by section. Sections can be saved as a PDF, making it handy for anyone with a tablet. DSM Online complements our other psychology resources, including PsycInfo, PsycTherapy, PEP Archive, among others. Check out our Psychology subject guide for more resource recommendations.

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Title: Secret Lives: Kathryn Braisted
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Abstract: The second article in a series of profiles, sharing the secret lives of our Library personnel. This profile takes a look at Library Operations Specialist, Kathryn Braisted—and her secret life as a community food systems activist.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 10/01/2014
Content:

In her position as Library Operations Specialist, Kathryn Braisted helps run the Graduate Research Center, offers technological support to students and other patrons, maintains library equipment, and provides logistical support to campus staff by preparing for and setting up events. Her key role is ensuring the well-being of Library patrons, employees, and the Library collection. She and her colleagues do this by monitoring the conditions and activities inside the library, enforcing policies, providing information to Library visitors, and responding to emergency situations. Kathryn also works to promote sustainable and ecologically friendly practices throughout the Library as a member of the Green Team, an internal group that strives to reduce the carbon footprint at Bender Library and to encourage eco-conscious behavior in our visitors and employees. 

Kathryn describes her favorite part of her job as the collaborative and supportive environment. "It's exciting to come to work and feel happy to be here, knowing that I'm surrounded by intelligent, supportive, good people. Because the nature of my job means I run around to different departments all day long, I get to connect with coworkers all over the Library—and, as a result, I have such an appreciation for the work we do respectively and its place in furthering the Library's mission. It's really meaningful to see everyone using their strengths and doing what they're good at to work toward a common goal."

She brings that same positivity to her volunteer work as a food access activist. Since her sophomore year at American University, Kathryn has worked with local non-profit organizations focused on increasing food access within the DC Metro area. In her classes at AU, she learned about the issues facing local communities that did not have adequate access to healthy foods—and felt driven to be a part of the solution to this problem. She began her journey interning at the Crossroads Community Food Network in Takoma Park, MD, a non-profit organization focused on creating models for improving food access in at-risk communities and putting such a model into action in the Langley Park/Takoma Park neighborhoods. 

After that, Kathryn interned with DC Greens, working within the Mundo Verde Public Charter School in Mt. Pleasant to start a school garden. This experience was particularly rewarding, as Kathryn oversaw the project from its inception to completion, participating in the design process and the selection of entirely recycled building materials. She integrated the garden into the curriculum, teaching a weekly kindergarten nutrition lesson in Spanish. 

The joyfulness of this experience is evident in Kathryn's description of her internship with DC Greens: "I loved working with kids to build a school garden. What is salient about gardens is their ability to bridge the gap in access and offer a learning experience about where food comes from. In order for kids to understand the importance of including fruits and veggies in their diets, they need to understand how nutrition impacts their bodies." Kathryn encourages anyone who wants to learn more about the power of community gardens to watch this "incredible TED talk from a man who turned the grass in sidewalk medians into neighborhood edible gardens!"

Kathryn continues to work with Crossroads Community Food Network, volunteering every Wednesday at their Crossroads Farmer's Market in Langley Park. She describes this weekly event featuring local vendors, farmers, and musical performers as an "extension of the neighborhood that empowers the community with knowledge and resources. Crossroads is so special because they are invested in learning from the community. In fact, this was the first market in Maryland to participate in a double voucher program, matching the values of WIC checks and food stamps with market dollars, in order to double their value."

She encourages anyone who would like to get involved with community food system activism to start by looking at Common Good City Farm, an organization dedicated to education and food access within Washington, DC. In addition to the many excellent urban agriculture groups in the area, Kathryn also mentions that farmer's markets can always use more market volunteers to assist with set-up and other essential tasks. She loves being a part of a "campus where people are driven by passion and activism" and hopes to share her enthusiasm with the AU community.

Book Recommendations from Kathryn:

The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan (GT2850 .P65 2006)
"It is difficult to talk food systems without mentioning this groundbreaking book."

Unbowed: A Memoir by Wangari Maathai (SB63.M22 A3 2006).
"She was an environmentalist, the first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize for her work in environmental sustainability. Hers is a great story of the kind of powerful and significant change that communities can generate around any social issue."

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Title: Database of the Month: Wiley-Blackwell Cochrane Library
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Abstract: Our new Database of the Month feature showcases the Wiley-Blackwell Cochrane Library, a terrific resource for medical topics.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 09/12/2014
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Looking for well-researched, up-to-date reviews of medical topics? The Cochrane Library database is designed for doctors looking to keep up with the latest medical developments, but is now available for anyone at AU needing accurate, relevant, and easily understood medical summaries. Plain Language Summaries present the article's findings with minimal medical jargon. Sample topics include the relation of MMR vaccines to autism, whether Vitamin D supplements can prevent cancer, the efficacy of Alzheimer's treatment methods, and more. Want more health resource recommendations? Check out the Health and Fitness subject guide

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Title: “Images of Forgiveness” Comes to Bender Library
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Abstract: “Images of Forgiveness” is a thought-provoking collection of photos and personal narratives exploring forgiveness. This free exhibit is open to everyone and will be on display from Monday, Sept 15 to Friday Sept 26.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 09/11/2014
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This fall, Bender Library is presenting a new exhibit on social justice. "Images of Forgiveness" is a thought-provoking collection of arresting pictures and personal narratives exploring forgiveness in the face of atrocity.

"Images of Forgiveness" will examine forgiveness as a healing process, a transition out of victimhood and, ultimately, a journey of hope by drawing together voices from South Africa, America, Israel, Palestine, Northern Ireland, and England. First launched in London in 2004, this exhibit has since been displayed in over 300 venues worldwide.

The six-foot tall banners feature powerful, affecting stories from around the globe. Learn about the power of forgiveness through the experience of Katy Hutchison. Katy was able to overcome her anger and grief in order to forgive her husband's killer, Ryan Aldridge. The relationship that has developed between Katy and Ryan through this act of forgiveness illustrates Katy's belief that "Part of being human is rolling up your sleeves and taking an active part in repairing harm."

The theme of love and reconciliation is also made manifest in Robi Damelin's story of finding peace through forgiveness after her son David was shot by a sniper while serving in the Israeli army. Robi now works as an activist with The Parents Circle, an organization that unites bereaved Israeli and Palestinian families. Dani found that "the organization soon became my lifeline. I now spend my time travelling the world, spreading the message of reconciliation, tolerance and peace. The pain of David's death never goes away, but what do you do with this pain? Do you invest it in revenge or do you think creatively?"

The "Images of Forgiveness" exhibit is in partnership with The Forgiveness Project which uses real stories of victims and perpetrators to explore concepts of forgiveness, and to encourage people to consider alternatives to resentment, retaliation, and revenge.

This free exhibit is open to the entire community and will be on display from Monday, September 15 to Friday, September 26 on the First Floor of Bender Library.

It will be the first part of the Exploring Social Justice Series the Library will host this academic year. The Exploring Social Justice Series, a new program co-sponsored by the American University Library and the Kay Spiritual Life Center, brings in exemplary leaders from diverse backgrounds who will share their stories of love and forgiveness in action around the world. The speakers have had personal and profound experiences with injustice and have demonstrated the capacity to forgive and to live the rest of their lives committed to witness and advocate within their spheres of influence.

All events are free and open to the public. The series is supported by the Fetzer Institute. Upcoming lectures in this series include Sister Helen Prejean on her life work vigorously opposing state executions and Reed Brody, Counsel and Spokesperson for Human Rights Watch, offering an international perspective on the quest for justice.

For more information on this series, please visit the Exploring Social Justice webpage.

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Title: Enjoy These Sweet Library Selections for National Honey Month
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Abstract: September is National Honey Month and to celebrate we combed through our hive to bring you a swarm of resources.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 09/04/2014
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September is National Honey Month and to celebrate we combed through our hive to bring you a swarm of books, films, and CDs in honor of all things honey, bee, and beekeeping related. These titles and more are all available at the AU library.

Books

With cookbooks and guides to beekeeping, you'll be busier than a worker bee with these titles.

Letters from the Hive: An Intimate History of Bees, Honey, and Humankind By Stephen Buchmann (SF523.3 .B83 2005)
An account of the relationship between humans and bees from prehistoric to modern times and the rich history of the many uses for honey.

Anything by Karl von Frisch
The definitive expert on bees, Frisch won the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology for his work on investigations of the sensory perceptions of the honey bee and one of the first to theorize the waggle dance.
Bees: Their Vision, Chemical Senses, and Languages (QL569 .F74)
Dance Language and Orientation of Bees (QL568.A6 F643)

Honeybee Democracy by Thomas D. Seeley (QL568.A6 S439 2010)
Written by one of Frisch's students, this book showcases the nature of how bees make decisions democratically when it comes to the survival of the hive.

Buzz: Urban Beekeeping and the Power of the Bee by Lisa Jean Moore and Mary Kosut (E-Resources)
A look into the boom of urban beekeeping and trend in homegrown honey started in Brooklyn, NY.

The Winnie-the-Pooh Cookbook by Virginia H. Ellison (TX652.5 .E4345 2010)
Enjoy honey-centered treats such as berry whipped drinks or apricot honey bread with these recipes dotted with classic Winnie-the-Pooh illustrations.

Films

After baking some honey-based treats, relax with these buzz worthy films.

Vanishing of the Bees (Streaming)
A thrilling documentary following the collapse of bee hives and the deadly consequences of their vanishing.

Queen of the Sun: What are the Bees Telling Us? (Streaming)
Another look at the global bee crisis.

More than Honey (DVD 8570)
A worldwide look at bee colonies from California to Switzerland to China to Australia.

Music

Need a sweet score for a honey themed night? Only one really comes to mind: Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov's "Flight of the Bumblebee" (CD 881)

Want more information on honey, bees, or beekeeping? Stop by our Research Assistance Desk, and a friendly library expert will help you locate additional sources.

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