newsId: 29642A98-0083-F793-16F46F154353A74C
Title: Database of the Month: Wiley-Blackwell Cochrane Library
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Abstract: Our new Database of the Month feature showcases the Wiley-Blackwell Cochrane Library, a terrific resource for medical topics.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 09/12/2014
Content:

Looking for well-researched, up-to-date reviews of medical topics? The Cochrane Library database is designed for doctors looking to keep up with the latest medical developments, but is now available for anyone at AU needing accurate, relevant, and easily understood medical summaries. Plain Language Summaries present the article's findings with minimal medical jargon. Sample topics include the relation of MMR vaccines to autism, whether Vitamin D supplements can prevent cancer, the efficacy of Alzheimer's treatment methods, and more. Want more health resource recommendations? Check out the Health and Fitness subject guide

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Title: “Images of Forgiveness” Comes to Bender Library
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Abstract: “Images of Forgiveness” is a thought-provoking collection of photos and personal narratives exploring forgiveness. This free exhibit is open to everyone and will be on display from Monday, Sept 15 to Friday Sept 26.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 09/11/2014
Content:

This fall, Bender Library is presenting a new exhibit on social justice. "Images of Forgiveness" is a thought-provoking collection of arresting pictures and personal narratives exploring forgiveness in the face of atrocity.

"Images of Forgiveness" will examine forgiveness as a healing process, a transition out of victimhood and, ultimately, a journey of hope by drawing together voices from South Africa, America, Israel, Palestine, Northern Ireland, and England. First launched in London in 2004, this exhibit has since been displayed in over 300 venues worldwide.

The six-foot tall banners feature powerful, affecting stories from around the globe. Learn about the power of forgiveness through the experience of Katy Hutchison. Katy was able to overcome her anger and grief in order to forgive her husband's killer, Ryan Aldridge. The relationship that has developed between Katy and Ryan through this act of forgiveness illustrates Katy's belief that "Part of being human is rolling up your sleeves and taking an active part in repairing harm."

The theme of love and reconciliation is also made manifest in Robi Damelin's story of finding peace through forgiveness after her son David was shot by a sniper while serving in the Israeli army. Robi now works as an activist with The Parents Circle, an organization that unites bereaved Israeli and Palestinian families. Dani found that "the organization soon became my lifeline. I now spend my time travelling the world, spreading the message of reconciliation, tolerance and peace. The pain of David's death never goes away, but what do you do with this pain? Do you invest it in revenge or do you think creatively?"

The "Images of Forgiveness" exhibit is in partnership with The Forgiveness Project which uses real stories of victims and perpetrators to explore concepts of forgiveness, and to encourage people to consider alternatives to resentment, retaliation, and revenge.

This free exhibit is open to the entire community and will be on display from Monday, September 15 to Friday, September 26 on the First Floor of Bender Library.

It will be the first part of the Exploring Social Justice Series the Library will host this academic year. The Exploring Social Justice Series, a new program co-sponsored by the American University Library and the Kay Spiritual Life Center, brings in exemplary leaders from diverse backgrounds who will share their stories of love and forgiveness in action around the world. The speakers have had personal and profound experiences with injustice and have demonstrated the capacity to forgive and to live the rest of their lives committed to witness and advocate within their spheres of influence.

All events are free and open to the public. The series is supported by the Fetzer Institute. Upcoming lectures in this series include Sister Helen Prejean on her life work vigorously opposing state executions and Reed Brody, Counsel and Spokesperson for Human Rights Watch, offering an international perspective on the quest for justice.

For more information on this series, please visit the Exploring Social Justice webpage.

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Title: Enjoy These Sweet Library Selections for National Honey Month
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Abstract: September is National Honey Month and to celebrate we combed through our hive to bring you a swarm of resources.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 09/04/2014
Content:

September is National Honey Month and to celebrate we combed through our hive to bring you a swarm of books, films, and CDs in honor of all things honey, bee, and beekeeping related. These titles and more are all available at the AU library.

Books

With cookbooks and guides to beekeeping, you'll be busier than a worker bee with these titles.

Letters from the Hive: An Intimate History of Bees, Honey, and Humankind By Stephen Buchmann (SF523.3 .B83 2005)
An account of the relationship between humans and bees from prehistoric to modern times and the rich history of the many uses for honey.

Anything by Karl von Frisch
The definitive expert on bees, Frisch won the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology for his work on investigations of the sensory perceptions of the honey bee and one of the first to theorize the waggle dance.
Bees: Their Vision, Chemical Senses, and Languages (QL569 .F74)
Dance Language and Orientation of Bees (QL568.A6 F643)

Honeybee Democracy by Thomas D. Seeley (QL568.A6 S439 2010)
Written by one of Frisch's students, this book showcases the nature of how bees make decisions democratically when it comes to the survival of the hive.

Buzz: Urban Beekeeping and the Power of the Bee by Lisa Jean Moore and Mary Kosut (E-Resources)
A look into the boom of urban beekeeping and trend in homegrown honey started in Brooklyn, NY.

The Winnie-the-Pooh Cookbook by Virginia H. Ellison (TX652.5 .E4345 2010)
Enjoy honey-centered treats such as berry whipped drinks or apricot honey bread with these recipes dotted with classic Winnie-the-Pooh illustrations.

Films

After baking some honey-based treats, relax with these buzz worthy films.

Vanishing of the Bees (Streaming)
A thrilling documentary following the collapse of bee hives and the deadly consequences of their vanishing.

Queen of the Sun: What are the Bees Telling Us? (Streaming)
Another look at the global bee crisis.

More than Honey (DVD 8570)
A worldwide look at bee colonies from California to Switzerland to China to Australia.

Music

Need a sweet score for a honey themed night? Only one really comes to mind: Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov's "Flight of the Bumblebee" (CD 881)

Want more information on honey, bees, or beekeeping? Stop by our Research Assistance Desk, and a friendly library expert will help you locate additional sources.

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Title: A Library Cheat Sheet for Students and Faculty
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Abstract: Hit the ground running with this Library cheat sheet, designed to get you in the know—FAST.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 08/29/2014
Content:

1. Library Website

Use the Library homepage as your launch pad—from here, you may:

  • search our collection of print and electronic resources
  • find tutorials explaining how to use the library and our services
  • explore Subject Guides that lead you to some of the best material in your subject area, saving you time and effort
  • get information on Library hours, policies, and partners

2. Loan Periods for Normal Circulating Materials

  • Undergraduates/staff/alumni: 4 weeks (alumni have access to the AU collection only)
  • Graduates: 6 weeks 
  • Faculty: 6 weeks to 4 months

Read More about loan periods.

3. Remember Your AU ID

A valid AU ID is required to enter the building during overnight hours. You will also need your AU ID to borrow materials.

4. Food and Drink

  • Permitted in most sections of the Library
  • Drinks must have lids
  • Only non-messy, snack foods are allowed

For more details, read the full policy.

5. Student Jobs at the Library

Over 200 students have part-time jobs at the Library. We offer work-study and non-work-study jobs, check our current postings.

6. Library and Research Commons Services

The Library is an academic and research destination that provides access to information and research tools, along with expert and personalized guidance through the entire research process. Read more about the services we offer.

7. Technology Rentals

In our role as a center for innovation on campus, we provide networks and technology to support research, collaboration, and socializing.

8. Print Resources

In addition to the AU Library collection, you may request books from our Washington Research Library Consortium partners—directly through our catalog. Hard-to-find materials may also be requested through our Inter-Library Loan unit

9. E-Resources

In addition to our print collection, the Library offers access to a host of electronic resources, including eBooks; databases; online periodicals; digital collections supporting primary source research; and the AU Digital Repository, a repository for scholarly works, teaching tools, and other literature produced by the AU community.

10. Reference Assistance

For quick research help, you may visit our Research Assistance Desk on the 1st Floor of Bender Library, call (202) 885-3238, or find us on Google Hangouts (AskAULibrary@gmail.com).

For more in-depth or discipline-specific assistance, our Library Subject Specialists are available for specialized research help. You may also submit a Research Consultation Request through the Library website.

Want to learn more? Check out our Find More Answers Knowledgebase.

We are very proud of our culture of service at the AU Library—and our users have come to expect and appreciate our hands-on, attentive, and personalized services.

If you have any unanswered questions, we invite you to contact us at 202-885-3232 or stop by any of our service desks.

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Title: Locker checkout available at the Bender Library
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Abstract: Semester loan lockers available beginning on August 25th on a first-come, first-serve basis.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 08/27/2014
Content:

Semester use lockers are available for checkout from the Borrowing Desk on the First Floor of Bender Library. They are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

The lockers are available free of charge to currently registered students with an AU ID card or valid government issued photo ID. Locker keys will be due on Tuesday, December 16 (the day after the last day of finals). Requests for specific locker locations will be accommodated as availability allows.

Lockers vary in size, with many able to accommodate a bag or backpack. Students can use lockers to store personal items or items for class. However, students are asked not to store food in the lockers, as this attracts pests that may be damaging to the Library's collection. Students are asked not to put any additional locks onto the lockers. Unauthorized locks will be removed by University staff.

Day-use lockers are also available on a first-come, first-served basis throughout the semester for students who do not need a semester-use locker. Day-use lockers can be checked out from the Borrowing Desk except for day-use lockers located in the Graduate Research Center, which are available for check out by graduate students from the GRC Desk.

For more information on locker terms and conditions, drop by the Circulation Desk or contact us at 202-885-3221 or circulation@american.edu.

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Title: Librarian Profile: Mary Mintz
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Abstract: This fourth article in our series of librarian profiles focuses on Associate Director for Outreach Mary Mintz. Mary’s background in Literature and Library Sciences allows her to support the academic growth of students during their time at AU.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 08/20/2014
Content:

A member of the American University community for thirty years, Associate Director for Outreach Mary Mintz developed a deep love of literature and learning early on, growing up as the daughter of a high school and college English teacher in her native North Carolina. Later, she knew that she wanted to "make a difference in the academic experience of college students" even before she completed her master's degrees in library science and English literature. After her own deeply rewarding college experience as a member of the first entering class to admit women at Davidson College, Mary knew that academia was the right fit for her. When Mary arrived at AU in the 80s, the university was in the early stages of an evolutionary process in terms of growth, reputation, and intellectual engagement. Mary describes the AU student of today as "committed, caring, and—simply awesome." As a member of the honors applications review process, Mary sees firsthand the "engagement, passion, and ideals" of the student body.

Where can you find her?

Mary is the Library liaison for about ten different undergraduate groups, including AU Honors students, AU Scholars, Frederick Douglass Distinguished Scholars, the University College, and the Washington Mentorship Program. Undergraduate support efforts put Mary in contact with a variety of students, faculty, staff, and administrators.

In addition to providing research assistance through personal appointments and work at the Reference Desk, Mary meets with the orientation leaders for incoming students to share information about the Library with freshman and new transfer students. She also encounters new students through her library instruction in College Writing and other courses. This puts her in the unique position of working with students to develop the fundamentals of research and writing and then, in her role providing capstone support for History and Literature students, seeing how their work has progressed. She is able to see the full circle of undergraduate progress from freshman to senior year. Mary considers this to be an extremely gratifying element of her job.

In addition to these ongoing efforts, Mary always is particularly happy to discuss literature and history, especially the work of Jane Austen and Austen's era. She is an enthusiastic member and officer of the Jane Austen Society of America.

Why she loves her job

Mary sees "student interaction and response in the classroom and the challenge of assisting students with sophisticated and complex projects" as just a few of the many rewards of Mary's work as a librarian. She is passionate about the emphasis librarianship places on service. In her instructional work, Mary strives "to create an engaging classroom environment" and enjoys working with faculty to plan successful class sessions. Mary also likes having the chance to connect with students on a more personal level.

In the Community

Mary long has taken a very active role in university life. In many years, she has served on the university's Faculty Senate, including serving as chair of that body for two years. She also served on the university search committee for the current University President.

Mary strongly encourages all incoming students to pay a visit to the Library to learn more about the research resources available to them—and to "ask a librarian" whenever they need assistance with research. Her hope is that AU students will take their research skills with them beyond the university, just as they take their engagement, passion, and ideals.

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Title: Get to Know the People Behind the Scenes at AU Library
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Abstract: The first article in a series of profiles, sharing the secret lives of our Library personnel. This profile takes a look at Music Library Coordinator, Sam Reggio—and his secret life as a vinyl collector and music enthusiast.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 08/06/2014
Content:

As a music buff and record collector, Sam Reggio feels right at home in his role as Music Library Coordinator. Sam's enthusiasm for both libraries and music is contagious—especially when he articulates his sense of them as a means of connecting people. With a background in literature and education, Sam was no stranger to libraries, but their value as community centers did not occur to him until after college. While working at an education non-profit, he was struck by the need for third spaces for adolescents—accessible, safe locations beyond school and home.

Sam continued to work with young people, from 6-year-olds to teens, as a part of his work in the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Program. Living in the Kōchi Prefecture of Japan for three years was a transformative experience, leaving Sam with a deeper appreciation of the importance of community and the need to provide civic spaces for "kids at that in-between age—places where they are wanted and valued."

This attraction to service led Sam back to libraries. After returning to the US, he enrolled in the Library and Information Science program at the Catholic University of America and completed his MLS this past spring. At the Music Library, Sam finds his work most fulfilling when he is helping others, connecting students and faculty with the resources they need, and having the opportunity to relate to users through their shared passion for music.

With a "small" personal collection of about 1,000 records, Sam shares music with a group of friends through their any-genre-goes Record Geek Night , which he describes as "like a book club, but for records." He notes the resurging popularity of vinyl records, a means of interacting with music that is a "tactile, fun way to engage with something you love and makes the ritual of listening to music more profound."

Sam keeps up with new music through record reviews, interviews with performers, and suggestions from friends. He also enjoys taking part in DC's live music scene. Still interested in the role of venues as a third space, Sam praises the all-ages shows offered at the Black Cat on 14th Street NW: "They are doing it right, for all the right reasons—creating community." He also has a great appreciation for house shows, "the best way to see innovative and unknown performers in DC."

Album Recommendations from Sam:

The Knife, Shaking the Habitual (CD 10272)
"This Swedish electronic duo is whole process oriented, putting ideals into practice and even making their own instruments. Their noisy and abrasive, off-kilter and wild sound explores the concept of protest music for the modern era."

Swans, The Seer (CD 10274)
"An American band from New York, this group has been together since the 80s (albeit with a long hiatus). Their music is intense, noisy, and repetitive, blending elements of rock and blues."

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Title: Crack Open a Classic
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Abstract: Summer is the ideal time to pick up a book that you never finished—or always meant to read. If you are looking for some great summer reading recommendations, the Library has got you covered. Check out these suggestions from Library personnel.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 08/01/2014
Content:

Summer is the ideal time to pick up a book that you never finished—or always meant to read. If you are looking for some great summer reading recommendations, the Library has got you covered. Check out these suggestions from Library personnel.

Nancy, University Librarian

Dandelion Wine

Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury
PS3503 .R167 D35 2006
If you want the flavor of August in 1928, told through the lens of a 12-year-old boy, this may be the book. Ray Bradbury based the book on his own childhood, but it is a work of fiction. Douglas Spalding is 12 and his brother Tom is 10. Their Grandpa makes dandelion wine—"summer in a bottle," he calls it. Greentown, IL is the setting for the group of boys who learn the past from a Civil War veteran they call the Time Machine, but the old soldier can't remember if he fought for the North or the South. They see the future as buses replace electric trolleys, and other events [no spoilers here] cause them to begin to understand their own mortality. The large and close Spalding family passes much of the summer on the front porch, but Bradbury gives only the barest outline of his characters' appearances, allowing the reader to add faces of one's choosing to bring the book to life. As in his other books, Bradbury's imagery alone is worth the read: "shoes, as quiet as a summer rain falling on the walks."

Andrew, Circulation Services Specialist

War and Peace

War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
PG3366 .V6 1982
The story of Russians during the Napoleonic War—At its core, War and Peace is probably the greatest realist novel ever written and the characters will live with you long after you've finished the novel. "There remains the greatest of all novelists—for what else can we call the author of War and Peace?" -Virginia Woolf 

Sun Also Rises

Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
PS3515 .E37 S9
Hemingway's best novel. In it, the lives of the Lost Generation are refracted through a group of friends traveling around Europe, looking for love, bull fights, and their next drink. And, of course, it's about love.

Becca, Manager of Resource Description

Grapes of Wrath

Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
PS3537 .T3234 G7
The themes (workers' rights &man's impact on the climate) of this classic American migration tale set during the Great Depression remain as relevant today as they were 75 years ago. Summer is the perfect time to immerse yourself in the Joads' struggle as they cross the desert into California.

Jackie, Circulation Services Specialist

The Awakening

Awakening by Kate Chopin
PS1294 .C63 A6 2000
Set in New Orleans and the surrounding coastal region at the turn of the century, a young wife and mother becomes increasingly disenchanted with her life and actively seeks to free herself from societal norms. It's considered one of the first truly feminist novels, and it is a great read.

Kathryn, Reference Librarian

Magic Mountain

Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann
PT2625 .A44 Z31
Nobel Laureate Thomas Mann's Magic Mountain (Der Zauberberg) is a masterful commentary on Europe careening toward the Great War. Through the eyes of young Hans Castorp and the international clientele of an elite TB sanatorium in the Swiss Alps, Mann's bildungsroman chronicles the intellectual, political, and social scene of early 20th century Europe. The complex themes of Magic Mountain are particularly relevant as the 100th Anniversary of World War I refocuses attention on the "war to end all wars." (Want to learn more about the WWI but don't like fiction? Try Barbara Tuchman's The Guns of August.)

Laura, Assistant to the University Librarian

The Good Soldier

Good Soldier: A Tale of Passion by Ford Madox Ford
PR6011 .O53 G6 2012
The Good Soldier takes place in England in 1915. It feels like a peek behind the curtain at a certain lifestyle in England. A sad story filled with witty lines. Worth reading for the writing alone!

Big Rock Candy Mountain

Big Rock Candy Mountain by Wallace Stegner
PS3537 .T316 B5 1991
This novel takes place on the plains and in Canada in the early 20th Century. It is told from multiple perspectives. Stegner is a great writer and the characters come to life in a sweeping tale that spans a generation.

Molly, Visual Media Collections Coordinator

A Study In Scarlet

Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
PR4622 .S933 1994
For those who enjoy a good mystery or love Benedict Cumberbatch in the BBC series Sherlock, read the original books by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle! Witty, easy reads, the books are great to read outside on a lunch break or at the beach, and it is fun comparing the series to its inspiration.

Dark is Rising sequence

Dark is Rising sequence by Susan Cooper
PZ7 .C7878 Dar 2000
For fun, quick reads this summer, YA books, such as Susan Cooper's classic series, are a great alternative to cheesy romances and mysteries.

Rose, Budget Coordinator

East of Eden

East of Eden by John Steinbeck
PS3537 .T3234 E3
This story about good and evil unexpectedly became one of my favorite books. It forces you to think about your beliefs in humanity and is so haunting that I reread it every year.

Sam, Music Library Coordinator

Moby Dick

Moby Dick by Herman Melville
PS2384 .M62 H47 1998
I heartily recommend Moby Dick as a summer reading classic. I mean, it's the quintessential American novel, but I do think it deserves its status. A who's who of under-dog miscreants traverse the globe looking for wealth and revenge. Pure American hubris at its best/worst. It is long, but takes place on a boat—and we all want to be on a boat in the summer, right? I've read it four times.

Last, but not least, a novel so beloved it gets two reviews:

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez
PQ8180.17 .A73 Z96

Katherine, Archives Specialist

One Hundred Years of Solitude

Read about the Buendía family in One Hundred Years of Solitude. Between the magical realism and compelling characters, you are sure to lose track of time with this summer read.

Jenise, Reference Librarian

Cien Años de Soledad

Incredibly timely since Gabriel García Márquez's passing. I read this for the first time the summer of my 21st year and I'll never forget the dreamy state it left me in each time I picked it up. I'm a big believer in season-appropriate reads and One Hundred Years begs to be read during the summer, on a porch, accompanied by something ice cold to drink.

AU Students, Faculty, and Staff—Tell us about your favorite books and films on Twitter and Facebook! For even more recommendations, visit our Pinterest page.

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Title: 5 LGBT Resources at the AU Library
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Abstract: Learn more about the suite of LGBT resources available through AU Library. Everything from the specialized collection at the Gender & Sexuality Library to the variety of streaming films relating to LGBT issues.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 06/11/2014
Content:

President Obama recently declared June as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month! Our collection of LGBT resources is perfect for research, exploration and celebration. Here are our top 5 resources:

  1. Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Subject Guide
    Your gateway to Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies resources in the American University Library collections, this subject guide covers essential books, newspapers, primary sources, and other key holdings.

  2. Center for Diversity & Inclusion Gender and Sexuality Library—MGC 201
    This partner collection, containing more than 1,000 volumes, is located in the Center for Diversity & Inclusion in Mary Graydon Center (room 201) and is fully searchable through the ALADIN catalog.

  3. LGBT E-Journals
    Use the AU Library Journal Finder to access to a wealth of LGBT-focused academic journals, including:
    Annual Report of the Office of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Affairs
    Gay & Lesbian Law Journal
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services
    Vanguard


  4. Streaming Video Collection
    Explore a wide selection of LGBT documentaries and films within the following streaming media resources:
    LGBT Studies in Video
    Docuseek 2
    Filmakers Library Online
    Films on Demand


  5. LGBT Life (Full-text)
    This database is a gateway to literature on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender issues from around the world. It allows you to search a range of source types, including books, speeches, case studies, and journals.
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Title: Get Amped Up for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil with These Library Selections
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Abstract: Explore the music of Brazil and a wealth of books and films related to soccer, just in time for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. Every title here can be found in the collection of the AU Library.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 05/30/2014
Content:

The beautiful game is going to Brazil—and the world will be watching. Brush up on your soccer knowledge, or just immerse yourself in Brazilian culture with the following CDs, books, and movies. These titles and more are available at the AU Library.

Music:

Hosting any World Cup viewing parties? Set the mood before you turn on the match with some music from Brazilian artists.

  • Acoustic Brazil (CD 5027) Warm acoustic performances by various artists, showcasing regional music
  • Brasileiro (CD 9683) Grammy-winning Bossa Nova album by Sérgio Mendes
  • Caetano Veloso (CD 9854) Self-titled album from the award-winning composer and performer 
  • Gil e Jorge (CD 9855) Iconic Brazilian musicians Jorge Ben and Gilberto Gil collaborate on this 1975 classic
  • Tropicália: A Brazilian Revolution in Sound (CD 9862) Compilation album capturing the music of Tropicalismo, a 1960s cultural and artistic movement in Brazil

The Music Library is located in the Katzen Arts Center, First Floor (141).

Books:

If you’re looking for something to read on your flight to Sao Paulo, or just for your Metro ride into the office, we have a great selection of titles.

  • The Ball is Round: A Global History of Soccer by David Goldblatt (GV942.5 .G65 2008) Critically acclaimed and engaging history of soccer
  • El Futbol a Sol y Sombra by Eduardo Galeano (GV942.7 .G35 2000) The history of world soccer, as told by an award-winning writer
  • Fever Pitch by Nick Hornby (GV943.2 .H67 1998) Hilarious and honest, this classic is an autobiographical look at the life of a soccer fanatic
  • Inverting the Pyramid: A History of Football Tactics by Jonathan Wilson (GV943.9.T7 W55 2009) An in-depth examination of soccer strategy for serious fans
  • A History of the World Cup: 1930-2006 by Clemente Angelo Lisi (GV943.49 .L57 2007) Delve into the first eight decades of this sporting event watched by millions around the globe
  • How Soccer Explains the World: An Unlikely Theory of Globalization by Franklin Foer (JZ1318 .F64 2010) A look at how soccer interacts with and influences the global economy
  • Soccer Empire: The World Cup and the Future of France by Laurent Dubois (eBook) Learn more about the complex intersection between soccer and colonialism
  • Soccernomics: Why England Loses, Why Germany and Brazil Win, and Why the U.S., Japan, Australia, Turkey—and Even Iraq—Are Destined to Become the Kings of the World’s Most Popular Sport by Simon Kuper and Stefan Szymanski (GV943.9 .S64 K88 2009) A Moneyball-esque look at how data does, doesn’t, and could influence soccer

Film:

These films are perfect to whet your appetite for the banquet of upcoming World Cup matches.

  • “The ‘99ers,” Nine for IX (HU DVD 8530, Disc 3) An exploration of the U.S. Women’s soccer team that won the 1999 World Cup
  • Bend It Like Beckham (HU DVD 672) The international smash hit about the daughter of an orthodox Sikh family, torn between tradition and her love of soccer
  • The Damned United (HU DVD 7058) This sharp, funny British drama delves into the rivalry between two soccer teams managers
  • Green Street Hooligans (HU DVD 9087) An indie drama based on the gritty world of soccer hooliganism in the UK
  • “The Two Escobars,” 30 for 30 (HU DVD 7907) A look at two influential men named Escobar and the interaction between soccer, drugs, and crime
  • Zidane: Un Portrait du 21e Siècle (BLU 8849) Experience a soccer match viewed through the actions of celebrated and controversial player Zinedine Zidane

Media Services is located on the Lower Level of Bender Library.

For more films on the wide world of sports, check out the Library’s Media Services Pinterest. Plus stop by Bender Library to catch a World Cup game—the games will be on whenever we are open.

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Title: Summer School 101: Library Resources From a Distance
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Abstract: Make the most of your summer no matter where you are with resources available from the Library. Whether you are taking online classes, working on your research, or looking to learn a new skill, we have the resources you need.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 05/28/2014
Content:

Whether you are taking online classes, working on your research, or looking to learn a new skill, the Library has the resources you need to get the most out of your summer work no matter where you are. Here are 10 terrific ways to get started:

  1. eBooks
    With more than 300,000 eBooks in our collection, lugging around a heavy backpack may be a thing of the past. To make locating these titles even easier, you can limit your catalog searches to eBooks only.

  2. Subject Guides
    Our librarian-created subject guides take the guesswork out of finding resources for your topic. These guides will lead you to some of the best material in your subject area, saving you time and effort.

  3. Online Tutorials
    Visit our website for online tutorials on a wide range of topics, including Endnote (a citation management program), developing research skills, working with Google Scholar, and creating a literature review.

  4. Distance Reference Services
    Reference Services are not just a desk in the library. We provide reference services in a variety of ways, allowing you to choose the method that is most convenient for your schedule.

    The Ask-A-Librarian webpage is the starting point for getting research assistance.
    • Chat online with our librarians or text a question from a cell phone to (571) 766-6349.
    • IM and Text Reference summer hours: Monday–Thursday 11am to 9pm; Friday 11am to 6pm.
    • A phone call to the reference desk is another option for quick questions: 202-885-3238
    • For more involved research questions, offsite students are encouraged to email their questions—the librarian on duty will be able to research an answer or refer it to a subject specialist.

  5. Streaming Media
    More than 20,000 videos and over 100,000 musical albums can be streamed through the Library website.

    Our streaming video collection
    includes documentaries, archival footage, recordings of performing arts, and independent films and shorts.

    World music, jazz, classical, and folk can all be enjoyed through our streaming music collection.

  6. eJournals and databases
    Let your fingers do the researching with our collection of digital resources. No matter where you are spending your summer, internet access is all you need to continue to utilize the Library. Limit your search to online items and let the research begin!

  7. AU Library Knowledgebase
    Find answers to your Library questions here. Topics run from basics like finding a book, to more complex topics, like accessing statistical datasets. If you cannot find what you are looking for, there is also a form to submit your own question.

  8. Article Request Services (CLS & ILL)
    You probably already knew that our Consortium Loan Service and Interlibrary Loan are terrific ways to get your hands on materials that AU does not own, but did you know that when you request articles (not books) through these two services, the material that you need is scanned and sent electronically via your My Library Account portal?

  9. Lynda.com
    Dedicate your summer to learning a new skill with this on-the-go resource!

    Perfect for the self-guided student, the lynda.com Online Training Library courses include such subjects as Photoshop, Dreamweaver, project management, education training, Web design, and programming languages. More than 2,500 courses are available across a range of subjects and ability levels.

    Note: All users will be prompted to log in to this resource. Please use your AU network username and password, not your usual My Library Account credentials.

  10. AU on iTunes U
    This service provides access to a wide range of American University related digital audio content via the iTunes Store. Enhance your educational experience with your iTunes library through recordings from American University.

    Catch up on the events that you missed during the last academic year, like Dr. Pamela Nadell’s fascinating Books that Shaped America discussion of How the Other Half Lives by Jacob Riis.

    Check out our guide for more information on getting started.
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Title: Rated YA
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Abstract: The AU Library has a great collection of YA novels and their film adaptations. Come check out Divergent or The Giver before seeing them in the theater. Or check out our range of videos, including the entire Harry Potter series.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 05/06/2014
Content:

If you like to read the book before you see the movie, AU Library has what you need! The motion picture Divergent, out in theaters now and featuring Shailene Woodley and Theo James, is based on the book by Veronica Roth (PZ7 .R7375 Di 2011), which can be found in our Curriculum Materials Center (3rd Floor). Another Woodley film, The Fault of Our Stars, will be released June 6, 2014, but you can check out the Josh Green novel (PZ7 .G8233 Fau 2012) now! We also have Lois Lowry’s critically acclaimed book The Giver (PZ7 .L9673 Gi 1993). The highly anticipated film version starring Jeff Bridges and Brenton Thwaites is scheduled for release on August 15, 2014.

Prefer to skip the lines at the movie theater? The Library offers both book and film versions of a number of popular YA adaptations, so that you can unwind with an at-home screening. New York Times bestseller The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky (PS3553 .H3469 P47 1999) was made into a commercially and critically successful motion picture starring Logan Lerman and Emma Watson (DVD 5478).

The Chosen by Chaim Potok (PS3566 .O69 C4) is a classic YA novel that inspired writers to adapt it for theater (as both a drama and a musical) as well as cinema. This award-winning film is available at the Library (DVD 8315). You can revisit the beloved Harry Potter series in book (PR6068 .O93s) and film (DVDs 6041-6048) formats at the Library. Host a post-finals marathon reading and viewing party covering Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone through Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2.

Another international sensation, Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight trilogy (PZ7 .M57188s) is also available in film versions at Media Services (DVDs 6891-6895). Or you can check out the incredibly popular Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins (PZ7 .C6837s) and the film version of the first two books (DVD 10315-6), which star Academy Award-winning actress, Jennifer Lawrence.

Vampire Romance or Dystopian Sci-Fi, we have YA books and films for every taste. Celebrate surviving your finals with a trip to the Library for some fun books and movies!

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Title: Librarian Profile: Melissa Becher
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Abstract: This third article in a series of librarian profiles focuses on Associate Director of Research, Teaching, and Learning Melissa Becher. With her interest in history, art, and geek culture, Melissa is an ideal resource for students of all disciplines.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 04/29/2014
Content:

Associate Director of Research, Teaching, and Learning Melissa Becher’s love of libraries goes back a long way. Growing up, she spent many hours at the library at the University of Akron campus where her father was a professor of Electrical Engineering. Her first job as a teenager was at the local public library, shelving books. As an undergraduate in Art History, Melissa accepted an internship at the Hirshhorn Museum. While there, she had the opportunity to visit a number of the specialized libraries located within the museums—and was hooked. Before and after receiving her MLS, Melissa worked for the Library of Congress. In 1996, she joined the American University Library.

Where can you find her?

In addition to answering questions at the Reference Desk and offering personal appointments at the library, Melissa teaches a number of information literacy sessions for the Art History and College Writing Departments. An admirer of Northern Renaissance art, Romanesque sculpture, and the artists of the Venetian school, Melissa is always happy to discuss art history research. Melissa is often around campus—on Wednesdays, you can find her checking out the locally grown offerings at the AU Farmer’s Market.

Why she loves her job

Melissa describes AU students as “highly engaged, passionate, and interested in changing the world” and is consistently impressed with the advanced level of their work. Her reference work allows her to interact with students and faculty from a variety of disciplines, on a wide range of topics. As a result she “learns something new every day.” Melissa’s enthusiasm for puzzles and problem solving is a natural fit with library science and providing research assistance. She sees her role as helping researchers create a more direct path to reaching their scholarship goals.

In her administrative role, Melissa has been involved in the evaluation and improvement of the library website. She works to maintain smooth operation of the software platforms behind the Library’s Subject Guides, Find More Answers knowledgebase, and Ask AU Library chat reference service. In addition to this, she conducts focus groups and usability tests to improve the website and library web services.

In the Community

As an administrator, scholar, and librarian, Melissa enjoys taking an active role in university life by participating in campus committees. She recently served on the Senate Committee on Information Services and as the Chair of the Senate Committee on Learning Outcomes and Assessment. Building relationships with other departments is a priority for Melissa, and she attends student research events as a way to connect with the broader AU community.

These student research events also inspire Melissa in her librarianship. “AU students are producing great humanitarian work and are going to change the world. We help them get there—and that is such an exciting thought.”

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Title: Increasing the Green Behind the Scenes at the AU Library
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Abstract: Library personnel work hard behind the scenes to reduce the carbon footprint of our work—and to encourage eco-conscious behavior in our visitors and employees.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 04/18/2014
Content:

The American University Library Green Team formed in 2011 to promote sustainable and ecologically friendly practices throughout the Library. Over the past three years, the team has engaged in many initiatives to help green the Library, and the campus. It has transitioned staff members to workstations with eco-friendly power strips, installed rechargeable batteries in clocks, increased energy efficient lighting throughout the building, and moved all of the public printers to 100% recycled paper. These efforts culminated in Bender Library's consecutive first place finishes in the university's Green Office Program (2011/12 and 2012/13). The Green Team has also hosted activities aimed at sustainability including do it yourself solar chargers for cell phones, and has helped distribute plants throughout the public and staff areas of Bender Library.

The Green Team also plays an integral role in promoting green practices like recycling and composting throughout the building. Bender Library was the first academic building on campus to use compost bins, diverting organic waste from landfills. The Green Team is currently running a Green Workspace initiative designed to encourage staff to participate in sustainable activities and create a sustainable workplace. Through all of these efforts, and participation in campus-wide events like Earth Day, the Green Team is working to make sure that the Library is a sustainable environment for the staff, students, faculty, and alumni of American University.

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Title: Hunker Down for Finals!
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Abstract: With finals just around the corner, the library will once again be offering 24/7 hours. Having all night access to study space, computers, library materials, and group work areas makes end of the semester workload a little bit easier to manage.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 04/18/2014
Content:

It is crunch-time once again. Presentations, papers, and projects are all due soon—and finals are on the horizon. Good news for all you night owls. Bender Library is moving to extended hours this weekend, when the library will stay open until midnight both Friday (4/18) and Saturday (4/19). Our 24/7 schedule begins on April 20th and provides a comfortable place for those all-night research and study sessions through the end of finals.

Our service desks, including Borrowing and Media Services will still close at 9pm on Friday and Saturday nights, but students are welcome to make use of study space and available materials all night long. Additionally, the self-check machines are accessible whenever the building is open.

After midnight, the building is accessible only to students and requires an AU ID for entry. Students must keep their AU ID on them at all times while in the building.

More information is available on our Overnight Hours page.

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Title: 5 Cool Research Tools
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Abstract: The AU Library wants to make your research easier and more rewarding. Here are five of the terrific tools that we offer to make your academic life a little simpler.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 04/11/2014
Content:

We are on a mission to make your research easier and more rewarding. Below we've listed five terrific tools that we offer to make your academic life a little simpler.

  • Zotero, Mendeley, and EndNote

    1. Free Citation Software

    Programs like EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero make it simple to grab citations throughout your research process and format them as needed. These citation managers can retrieve citations as you research, generate a bibliography, and help you maintain your own database of citations used throughout your academic career.

    Check out our Citation Style Guide to learn more and find the best program for you!

  • Poster Printer

    2. Poster Printer

    Our large format printer is perfect for creating professional looking posters for presentations, fairs, or projects. We have compiled a selection of helpful poster creation resources, including websites with downloadable templates, poster dos & don’ts, and design tips. Visit the Library website to explore these resources. You can also email us at autechservices@gmail.com to make an appointment for printing or request more information.

  • LibX

    3. LibX

    LibX American University Edition browser extension provides direct access to your Library's resources. This allows you to search our collections through an adaptive, configurable search box. LibX offers a “magic search” feature, which locates electronically available and accessible copies of articles through Google Scholar. Take LibX for a test drive on our research page and then scroll down to “other research tools”.

  • 3d printed model

    4. 3D Printer

    Create scale models, small props for films or photographs, or generate design prototypes with 3D printing at the library. Now located on the Lower Level, directly across from the Technology Services Desk, this is an inexpensive and fun way to test out your ideas. Let your imagination run wild and then email us at autechservices@gmail.com to make a reservation. For more information, visit our website.

  • BrowZine

    5. BrowZine

    This app can turn your tablet (or one checked out from Technology Services) into a bookshelf of your most-used journals! BrowZine works by organizing the articles found in Open Access and subscription databases, uniting them into complete journals, then arranging these journals on a digital newsstand. The result is an easy and familiar way to browse, read, and monitor scholarly journals across the disciplines. BrowZine is available for free download from the App Store or Google Play Store. Once downloaded, select American University and login with your credentials.

Want more great tips about our resources and tools? Stop by to talk to one of our Reference and Research Assistance Librarians today!

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Title: See What We Have to Offer at the Music Library
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Abstract: The AU Music Library is home to a range of materials and services available to all students. With a collection that includes musicals on DVD; over 10,000 CDs; scores; and music magazines, we have something for everyone.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 04/08/2014
Content:

Everyone already knows that the AU Library is the place for DVDs, reference help, comfy chairs, and printing. BUT, did you know that the AU Library also has a Music Library?

Across Massachusetts Ave. from main campus in the Katzen Arts Center, the Music Library is worth the walk for anyone with even a casual interest in music.

Our collection includes thousands of scores for you to look through and borrow, so if you’re starting to learn to play an instrument, we can find music appropriate for any skill level. If you haven’t touched that trumpet since high school band, and are looking to get back into it, we have a terrific selection of Popular, Classical, Jazz, and Musical scores. With practice scores for all ability levels, we can help you refine your already polished technique—or take a stab a teaching yourself how to play. No, you don’t need to be a music-major or even be taking classes in the Department of Performing Arts—if you go to AU, you can borrow from us.

The Music Library also has over 10,000 CDs. We know you stream stuff and YouTube things. (We do too!) But sometimes CDs are great—for sound quality, for album artwork and notes, and for having the whole thing. We have a lot of classical and jazz CDs, as well as classic rock, hip hop, pop, world, and folk. You can borrow up to 5 CDs at a time, keep them for a week, and return them to us or the borrowing desk in Bender Library.

Our music collection is only the tip of the iceberg. We also have DVDs of musicals (borrow for class or for fun), selected scripts (find the perfect monologue for your next audition), and computers with specialized software including Finale. We have a selection of magazines, from mainstream music industry big-hitter Billboard to the UK’s premiere experimental music magazine, The Wire, plus a comfortable reading area for relaxing in between classes.

Our greatest asset, though, is our staff. We’re all into, and love to talk, music—styles, bands, records, and more. There’s tons of music out there, clickable and in your face, but sometimes it’s nice to just talk to someone about music and what you’re into. That’s where we come in. 

Curious? You are always welcome to visit us in Katzen First Floor. During the semester, we’re open Monday–Thursday 9am–8pm, Friday 9am–5pm, and Saturday 11am–4pm.

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Title: AU Alumni and Friends Meet Up for Fun, Games, and Scholarship
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Abstract: Library friends and donors enhanced our Game Design & Persuasive Play collection at our recent Gaming with a Purpose fundraising event. This new collection will support the new MA in Game Design & Persuasive Play’s program in the School of Communication.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 04/02/2014
Content:

Donors, alumni, faculty, and students all came together to support the new Master of Arts in Game Design at Gaming with a Purpose, a fundraising event hosted by the Library on March 18. This event featured game materials that donors could choose as a gift to the Library in support of this new initiative. All of the event proceeds from the event will be used to support development of this collection.

American University's Master of Arts in Game Design in the School of Communication and College of Arts and Sciences is a unique, multi-disciplinary program focused on game design, play theory, and game engagement strategies intended to influence non-game contexts and challenges. The program is designed to develop the intellectual capacity of students as designers, developers, consumers, and games administrators. This is the only degree in persuasive play in the United States. Students who graduate from the program will be prepared to for a wide variety of jobs utilizing next-generation media engagement to change people’s interests, activities, and opinions.

Lindsay Grace, Director of the Persuasive Play Initiative, is a game designer and researcher. His game designs have received awards from Games for Change Festival, Meaningful Play, Advances in Computer Entertainment, and Gamescape. He has published more than 25 papers, articles, and book chapters on games since 2009. Grace describes AU's concept of gaming with a purpose as "games that go beyond entertainment—pursuing how games can change people’s behavior and how to produce socially responsible games.”

To support this initiative, the Library needs to build a collection of materials relevant to the field. To that end, we have been purchasing scholarly books in this field and speaking with faculty members about their instructional needs. They requested a substantial number of games—and we are pleased to fulfill this request.

The games that we acquired through the generosity of our donors include classic games, which can be used to teach the fundamentals of game development; vintage games, which can be used to increase our understanding of a specific era; war games, which simulate the complexity and strategy of combat situations; games based on real-world scenarios, such as a pandemic outbreak, which illustrate the theories of persuasive play; and others. The materials that we have acquired to support this program aid faculty to create a framework for discussion in their classrooms. Adding games to the curriculum is an ideal way to give students a hands-on understanding of the theory and mechanisms of game design and persuasive play.

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Title: Not Just Words: Symposium on Language & Endangered Alphabets
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Abstract: Languages and alphabets are not just historical artifacts—they also shape our cultures and perceptions of the world. This symposium will explore the importance of language and what happens when languages and writing systems die out.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 04/01/2014
Content:

Language and alphabets are critically connected to culture and help shape how their users view the world. Today, many languages and alphabets are considered “endangered.” What does that mean for the remaining speakers of these languages and for the cultures that created them? Our upcoming Symposium on Language & Endangered Alphabets explores the loss of global cultural diversity that occurs when languages and writing systems disappear.

The opening workshop, “Language Matters: Change, Choice, and Consequences” will be led by faculty from American University: Naomi Susan Baron, Professor of Linguistics in the Department of World Languages and Cultures (CAS) and Executive Director of the Center for Teaching, Research, and Learning, and Chip Gerfen, Professor and Chair of the Department of World Languages and Cultures (CAS). They will focus on why language, which we often take for granted, is so important, including the social, political, economic, and cultural forces that shape language usage. The discussion will draw on examples of change in spoken and written languages, both historical and modern.

Following this workshop, special guest Tim Brookes will discuss his Endangered Alphabets project. The director of the Professional Writing program at Champlain College, Professor Brookes, founded this project in 2009. As part of the project, he has created carved texts in more than 25 of the world's 30+ endangered writing systems. Exhibited throughout the United States and around the world, his work draws attention to the issue of endangered alphabets and their influence on cultures. Currently, Professor Brookes and his students are raising money to publish books in the languages of the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh. Providing texts published in these languages to schools will help more students, who may not speak the national language of Bangla, further their education. More information about this and other initiatives in the Endangered Alphabets project can be found on the project website www.endangeredalphabets.com.

Carvings from the Endangered Alphabets project will be on display during the reception. Professor Brookes will also have a few copies of his book, Endangered Alphabets; additional copies will be available to order. Several carvings will remain on exhibit on the Lower Level of the Library through mid-May 2014.

Students, faculty, staff, alumni, and neighbors are welcome to attend all or part of the symposium. There is no cost to attend, but RSVPs are appreciated for the reception.

Symposium on Language & Endangered Alphabets

Wednesday, April 2, 2014
Bender Library, Mud Box (Lower Level)
Participants are invited to attend all or portions of the event.

3–4pm: Language Matters: Change, Choice, and Consequences with Naomi Susan Baron & Chip Gerfen

4–5pm: Endangered Alphabets with Tim Brookes

5pm: Reception and Viewing, Endangered Alphabets carvings

This event is part of the new AU Library Presents series. It is co-sponsored by the American University Library; University Honors Program; American University World Languages & Cultures; Center for Teaching, Research, and Learning; and the American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center.

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Title: Take the Tension out of Presentations with the Kogod Center for Business Communications at the Library
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Abstract: The Kogod Center for Business Communications joins the Library through April 25 to help you with professional communications. Drop in or make an appointment for help with public speaking, presentations, and business writing.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 03/27/2014
Content:

The Kogod Center for Business Communications now offers a Professional Communications service in Room 1 of the Research Commons at Bender Library to provide help with presentations, public speaking, and business writing.

This service is available to all AU students, so no matter what your major is, come by for personal assistance with your professional communications!

The service runs March 25–April 25, 2014, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 3:30–5:30 p.m. and Fridays 12–2 p.m. Appointments are preferred, but drop-ins are accepted as space allows. Make an appointment online or by calling 202-885-1920.

Visit Professional Communications to

  • Practice a presentation or speech and receive supportive, insightful suggestions
  • Overcome public-speaking jitters
  • Improve the clarity and organization of your slides or poster papers

Professional Communications also provides help with all types of business and workplace writing—including reports, memos, emails, and cover letters—at every stage from first draft through revisions and on to the polished final product.

Prefer a workshop approach? Kogod Center for Business Communications Director Bonnie Auslander will be giving a workshop on Thursday, April 3 at 4pm in the Library Training & Events Room (115). “Speak Up” will cover public speaking skills for any situation from academic presentations to wedding toasts.

Don’t delay! It’s not too late to improve your presentation or public speaking skills this spring, and Professional Communications can provide the help you need.

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Title: Streamline your Research Paper Process with the Library
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Abstract: Research, citation, and review are all critical phases in the research paper process—and the library is here to lend a helping hand. With resources to assist you at every stage of the process, we may become your favorite study partner.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 03/14/2014
Content:

It is that time of year again—Research Paper Time. No need to feel stressed, because the library has all the tools you need to handle research, citation, and review.

Phase 1—Research

Start with a visit to the library website to explore our Subject Guides. Here, you will find a selection of research guides, arranged by subject, to help you hone in on the best resources for your topic. Our librarians locate some of the most useful databases, journals, and collections for each subject area, taking the guesswork out of that initial hunt for sources.

Make a research consultation appointment with a librarian to meet in person and discuss your research plans and questions. It is easy—just visit our Ask a Librarian page and click on “Email a Research Question.” Once we know more about your project, we will match you up with a librarian who has expertise in the subject you are researching.

Phase 2 – Citation

Check your citations from the couch with our Citation Style Guide. A number of these styles guides are available in full text online, including the Chicago Manual of Style and the AP Stylebook.

For versions not available online, the Citation Style Guide offers links to other online resources. You may also visit the library to use these style guides. We have updated copies of the MLA Handbook on every floor of the building, and copies of less frequently used guides, such the CSE Manual, available on Ready Reference.

Learn more about EndNote, a useful citation software program by checking out our EndNote Subject Guide. From here, you can download the program, access online tutorials, see our schedule of free drop-in classes, and look at FAQ from other users.

Phase 3 – Write & Review

Now you are ready to polish and refine your finished product. We have a few options to help you with this stage of the paper writing process. Make an appointment at the Writing Center (located on the 1st Floor of the library) for a free, personal coaching session with a student consultant for helpful feedback at any stage of your writing process. Just call 202-885-2991 to set up your session.

If you are ready for another round of edits, book one of our collaborative workrooms for a peer review session with your fellow classmates. Rooms must be reserved at least one hour in advance—and you can stake your claim at the Library Information Desk or by calling 202-885-3232.

This semester, make the library your Research Paper Headquarters!

Tags: Library,Library Services,University Library
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