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  • Chemistry
    202-885-1750
    Fax: 202-885-1752
    afarran@american.edu
    Beeghly, Room 104

    Farran, Arij B.
    Senior Administrative Assistant

Mailing Address

For current class offerings, times, and additional information, visit the Office of the Registrar.

 

CHEM-100: The Molecular World 5:1 (4)

A general introduction to chemistry leading to biochemistry and the chemistry of life. Study of the composition of materials, their structures and properties, related energy conversions, and the use of molecular genetic information. Questions of scientific inquiry and the scientific method in cultural and historical contexts are considered. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: completion of the University Mathematics Requirement, or concurrent enrollment in MATH-170 or MATH-211 or STAT-202.

 

CHEM-110: General Chemistry I 5:1 (4)

A general introduction to chemistry: the scientific method; atomic structure; stoichiometry and chemical reactions; heat changes; electronic structure of atoms; molecular geometry; and liquid, solid, gas, and solution chemistry. Provides a sound basis in concepts, vocabulary, and analytical problem solving. Related laboratory work covers the scientific method, measurements using scientific apparatuses, collection and manipulation of data, error analysis, and illustration of scientific principles. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: completion of the University Mathematics Requirement, or concurrent enrollment in MATH-170 or MATH-211 or STAT-202.

 

CHEM-205: The Human Genome 5:2 (3)

The human genome is the DNA book of life, containing information to create networks of proteins that construct a human being. The course discusses how the genome was read, how variants in DNA information are detected, and how interactions of networks of proteins are deciphered. Also, how this information changes views of disease, medical treatments, and our image of ourselves as a species. Can environmental factors override our genes (nurture vs. nature)? Substantial focus on ethical and social issues related to genetic testing, gene therapy, and our understanding of race. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite for General Education credit: BIO-100 or BIO-110 or CHEM-100 or CHEM-110 or PHYS-100 or PHYS-105 or PHYS-110 or PSYC-115.

 

CHEM-210: General Chemistry II 5:2 (4)

Oxidation-reduction reactions, reaction rates, equilibrium and its relation to thermodynamics, acid-base chemistry and its practical applications, electrochemistry, molecular bonding theory, and nuclear chemistry. Related laboratory work covers titration techniques, spectroscopic analysis, kinetics experiments, and introduction to qualitative and quantitative analysis. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite for General Education credit: CHEM-100 or CHEM-110 or PHYS-100 or PHYS-105 or PHYS-110.

 

CHEM-220: Environmental Resources and Energy 5:2 (3)

General discussion of the chemistry of our environment, including description of the ideal unpolluted environment and a historic view of pollution. Classes and interactions of pollutants with the environment are described. Emphasis is placed on understanding the chemistry of pollutants and how they affect our quality of life. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite for General Education credit: CHEM-100 or CHEM-110 or PHYS-100 or PHYS-105 or PHYS-110.

 

CHEM-230: Earth Sciences 5:2 (3)

Combines geology, geophysics, and geochemistry in describing the evolution of our planet, the deep structure of the earth, its plate tectonic evolution, and interaction of the crust with the hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere. Occasional laboratory demonstrations and field trips. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite for General Education credit: CHEM-100 or CHEM-110 or PHYS-100 or PHYS-105 or PHYS-110.

 

CHEM-250: Criminalistics, Crime, and Society 5:2 (3)

This course presents the unique and challenging application of science to law. The focus is on the scientific aspects of criminal investigations and judicial process. The course includes an overview of forensic science, the identification of illicit drugs, fibers, hairs, accelerants, gun shot residues, and explosives by chemical analysis, as well as DNA profiling. Emphasis is placed on the techniques of sampling a crime scene and the use of physical evidence to help solve cases. Students learn how to unlock the mystery of crimes through application of physical and chemical techniques. Prerequisite for General Education credit: CHEM-100 or CHEM-110 or PHYS-100 or PHYS-105 or PHYS-110.

 

CHEM-310: Organic Chemistry I (3)

Systematic treatment of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, carbonyl compounds, acids, and their derivatives. Ionic and free radical reactions and stereochemistry. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: CHEM-210. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-312.

 

CHEM-312: Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (1)

Laboratory theory and practice in synthesis, separation, and purification of organic compounds. Introduction to separation techniques including thin-layer, column, and gas chromatography. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: concurrent registration in CHEM-310.

 

CHEM-320: Organic Chemistry II (3)

Aliphatic and aromatic compounds and electrophilic substitution; spectral methods; and nitrogen compounds and their derivatives. Introduction to polyfunctional compounds including amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: CHEM-310; must be taken concurrently with CHEM-322.

 

CHEM-322: Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (1)

Multistep syntheses; synthesis of polyfunctional compounds; introduction to infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra; qualitative organic analysis. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: must be taken concurrently with CHEM-320.

 

CHEM-330: Environmental Chemistry (3)

This course emphasizes that all parts of the environment are made up of chemicals, and that natural processes occurring in the environment all involve chemical reactions. As part of a description of the chemistry of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere, the composition of an unpolluted environment is presented, as well as techniques used by the EPA to measure pollutants. Prerequisite: CHEM-110.

 

CHEM-335: Topics in Biological and Organic Chemistry (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include advanced techniques in QSAR and drug discovery. Meets with CHEM-635. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: CHEM-310/CHEM-312, and CHEM-320/CHEM-322 or equivalent.

 

CHEM-350: Quantitative Analysis (3)

Theory of acid-base, complexation, precipitation, and redox equilibria; volumetric and gravimetric analyses; separations; statistical analysis of data; separation and analysis of complex mixtures. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: CHEM-210 and MATH-221; must be taken concurrently with CHEM-351.

 

CHEM-351: Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (2)

Practice in classical analytical methods of analysis, including precipitation titrations and gravimetric analysis; neutralization titrations and potentiometric methods; oxidation, reduction, and complex formation titrations; and electrochemical methods. Computer-assisted statistical analysis of data. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: must be taken concurrently with CHEM-350.

 

CHEM-355: Topics in Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include advanced techniques in NMR and mass spectrometry. Meets with CHEM-655. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: CHEM-460/CHEM-461 and CHEM-550.

 

CHEM-398: Honors: Junior Year (1-3)

Independent chemical laboratory research project under the direction of a faculty advisor. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: CHEM-320/CHEM-322, and permission of department chair and university honors director.

 

CHEM-399: Honors: Junior Year (1-3)

Independent chemical laboratory research project under the direction of a faculty advisor. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: CHEM-320/CHEM-322, concurrent registration in CHEM-507, a grade of B or better in CHEM-398 if taken, and permission of department chair and university honors director.

 

CHEM-401: Geology (3)

Study of the interior and exterior of the earth and how it works. Focus is on the processes that shape the earth's surface: weathering, mass-wasting, water, wind, glaciers, and plate tectonics. The evolution of the earth including the impact of earthquakes, rock deformation, and landscape evolution. The import of the need for energy and mineral resources is also considered. Usually offered every third semester. Prerequisite: CHEM-110.

 

CHEM-410: Biophysical Chemistry (3)

This physical chemistry course provides an introduction to quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, and kinetics applied to biological systems by using examples from the life sciences. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: CHEM-210, MATH-221.

 

CHEM-411: Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory (1)

Experiments illustrate practical applications of physical chemistry to biochemical and biological systems. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: must be taken concurrently with CHEM-410.

 

CHEM-460: Instrumental Analysis (3)

Theory of optical and electroanalytical methods, including spectrophotometry, fluorometry, spectrography, and flame and atomic spectroscopy, ion-selective electrodes, polarography; amperometry; mass spectrometry; chromatography; electronics; radiometric techniques; isotope dilution; and neutron activation analysis. Analysis of errors. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: CHEM-320 and MATH-222, must be taken concurrently with CHEM-461.

 

CHEM-461: Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (2)

Practice in methods of instrumental analysis including atomic absorption and emission spectroscopy; gas and high pressure liquid chromatography; nuclear magnetic resonance, ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and fluorescence spectroscopy; and measurements with ion selective electrodes. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: must be taken concurrently with CHEM-460.

 

CHEM-490: Independent Study Project in Chemistry (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

CHEM-491: Internship (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

CHEM-496: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

CHEM-498: Honors: Senior Year (1-3)

Independent chemical laboratory research project under the direction of a faculty advisor. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: CHEM-420, CHEM-460, a grade of B or better in CHEM-399 if taken, and permission of department chair and university honors director.

 

CHEM-499:Honors: Senior Year (1-3)

Independent chemical laboratory research project under the direction of a faculty advisor. A senior thesis must be written and the results of research presented at a departmental seminar. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: CHEM-498 with a grade of B or better if taken, prior or concurrent registration in CHEM-507, and permission of department chair and university honors director.

 

CHEM-501: Principles of Analytical Chemistry (3)

Spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques, electrochemistry, and data treatment. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: organic chemistry and quantitative analysis.

 

CHEM-506: Human Physiological Chemistry (3)

Cell structure, structures and functions of amino acids, peptides, and proteins. Characteristics of blood, hemoglobin, and enzymes. Central metabolism and bioenergetics. Neurotransmission and muscle contraction. Metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, lipids, and amino acids. Hormonal regulation. Experiments coordinated with the lectures. Does not fulfill requirements in either chemistry or biology degree programs. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: a year of general chemistry.

 

CHEM-508: Human Biochemistry Laboratory (1)

Experiments related to clinical analysis of human biochemicals. Examines personal blood components, buffers, antacids, digestion, practical statistics, determination of blood hemoglobin, colorimetry, bioluminescence, enzymes, oral glucose tolerance testing, insulin, diabetes, hypoglycemia, determination of blood HDL cholesterol , lipoproteins, and heart disease. Usually offered alternate springs (odd years). Prerequisite: Biochemistry I and Biochemistry II (may be taken concurrently).

 

CHEM-510: Advanced Physical Chemistry (3)

Advanced physical chemistry course covering quantum chemistry, molecular spectroscopy, group theory, and modern physical chemistry research topics. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: CHEM-410 and MATH-313.

 

CHEM-511: Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2)

Experiments in quantum chemistry, spectroscopy, and physical chemical methods. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: must be taken concurrently with CHEM-510.

 

CHEM-520: Advanced Organic Chemistry I (3)

Principles of physical organic chemistry. Bonding and conformational analysis; nucleophilic substitution at carbon; elimination and addition reactions; carbene chemistry; and cycloaddition reactions. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: organic and physical chemistry.

 

CHEM-521: Advanced Organic Chemistry II (3)

Synthetic and mechanistic aspects of the chemistry of carbonyl compounds. Acylations, alkylations, and other condensations; oxidation and reduction reactions. Application of orbital symmetry correlations to organic reactions. Usually offered every spring

 

CHEM-540: Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3)

Modern techniques of chemical analysis: gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, ion chromatography, mass spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared, atomic absorption spectroscopy, inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: CHEM-460 and CHEM-461.

 

CHEM-550: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)

Electronic structure of atoms, periodic trends, bonding and structure of covalent compounds, electronegativity, bonding and structure of coordination complexes, acids and bases, organometallic chemistry, and bioinorganic chemistry. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: physical chemistry

 

CHEM-552: Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (1)

An introduction to classical inorganic chemical syntheses, purification methods and analyses. Techniques utilized in the identification of compounds include Fourier transform infrared, ultra violet and visable, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopies and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Some synthetic procedures utilize an inert atmosphere approach. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: organic chemistry laboratory.

 

CHEM-560 Biochemistry I (3) Biochemistry is the study of the chemistry of life. This course, the first of a two-course sequence, focuses on: structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, DNA and RNA; enzyme kinetics; DNA replication; gene expression and protein synthesis; recombinant DNA technology; DNA-based information technology. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: one year of organic chemistry.

 

CHEM-561 Biochemistry II (3) Biochemistry is the study of the chemistry of life. This course, the second of a two-course sequence, focuses on: principles of signal transduction; principles of bioenergetics and metabolic regulation; catabolism and anabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides; hormonal regulation of mammalian metabolism. Prerequisite: CHEM-560.

 

CHEM-565: Introduction to Proteomics (3)

An introduction to genomics and protein production from genes. Includes protein activities and functions; networks of proteins and protein expression; structural biological method for determining protein structures and interactions of small molecules such as pharmaceuticals, with protein targets; and methods for identifying protein functions and protein-protein interaction networks. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: CHEM-560.

 

CHEM-590: Independent Reading Course in Chemistry (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

CHEM-602: Research Method Design (3)

The development of laboratory skills and chemical communication. An introduction to laboratory safety, eye protection, and dealing with hazardous materials, and how to search literature indexes by formula and structure. Presentation of the purpose and strategy of research method design, and preparation of a research proposal. Usually offered every fall.

 

CHEM-605:Research Seminar (3)

Continuation of CHEM-604. Presentation and practice of modern chemical techniques, including thin layer chromatography, analytical and preparative high pressure liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, ion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, GC-MS and LC-MS, NMR, sample extraction and preparation techniques and methods used to standardize instruments. Students present a seminar describing the experimental results of their research project. Usually offered every spring.

 

CHEM-635: Topics in Biological and Organic Chemistry (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include advanced techniques in QSAR and drug discovery. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: CHEM-460, CHEM-461, and CHEM-550.

 

CHEM-655: Topics in Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include advanced techniques in NMR and mass spectrometry. Meets with CHEM-355. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: CHEM-550.

 

CHEM-700: Seminar in Chemistry (1)

Preparation and presentation of a paper of professional quality. Usually offered every fall and spring. Prerequisite: CHEM-507 and 12 graduate credit hours in chemistry.

 

CHEM-751: Research Seminar in Toxicology and Biochemistry

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Students deliver oral and written reports on various topics in contemporary toxicology, covering biological and chemical mechanisms of action of toxicants, testing methodology, and societal issues. Usually offered every spring.

 

CHEM-797: Master's Thesis Research (1-6)

 

CHEM-799: Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-20)