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Economics | Courses

For current class offerings, times, and additional information, visit the Office of the Registrar.

 
 

Course Descriptions

ECON-100: Macroeconomics 4:1 (3)

An introduction to the basic principles of macroeconomics, stressing national income, unemployment, inflation, economic growth, depression, prosperity, international economics, economic development, alternative approaches to economics, and current issues and controversies. Usually offered every term.

 

ECON-110: The Global Majority 3:1 (3)

Introduction to the plight of less-developed countries, to alternative paths of development, and to the relationships between the more-developed and less-developed countries. The central theme of economic development is based on elementary economic theory. Equally important, human dimensions of development are emphasized through the use of novels and films from less-developed countries. Usually offered every term.

 

ECON-196: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

ECON-200: Microeconomics 4:2 (3)

The basic principles of microeconomics and their applications; supply and demand, operation of markets, consumer and enterprise behavior, competition and monopoly, income distribution, discrimination, and alternative approaches to economics. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite for General Education credit: COMM-100 or ECON-100 or GOVT-110 or SOCY-150.

 

ECON-296: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

ECON-300: Intermediate Microeconomics (3)

Theory of relative prices of commodities and productive services under perfect and imperfect competition. Theory of the firm and consumer demand. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.

 

ECON-301: Intermediate Macroeconomics (3)

Concepts and theory of national income determination, employment, and economic growth. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.

 

ECON-317: Political Economy (3)

Survey of three major contemporary theories of political economy - Marxian, Feminist, and Institutionalist - with applications to current economic problems and alternative economic institutions. Prerequisite: ECON-100.

 

ECON-318: Economic History (3)

Historical investigation of economic development using Europe and the Third World as case studies. Emphasis is on economic theory to illuminate historical development. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.

 

ECON-319: United States Economic History (3)

The nature and sources of economic growth, the institutional transformation associated with economic development, and the social and economic consequences of economic change in the United States from the colonial times to the present. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.

 

ECON-320: History of Economic Ideas (3)

Exposition and analysis of development of economic theory. Emphasis on tracing evolution of economic theories out of specific historical contexts. Major figures and schools in economic thought from Adam Smith to the present. Attention given to the significance of having a separate body of thought called economics. Prerequisite: ECON-100.

 

ECON-322: Introduction to Econometrics (4)

Review of the theory of economic statistics and statistical techniques. Emphasis on applying statistical models to economic data. Regression analysis and estimation of economic models. Includes violations of the basic assumptions of the regression model, dummy variables, and analysis of variance. Index numbers and time series analysis. Lab allows students to learn how to apply theory of economic statistics. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-100, ECON-200, and STAT-202.

 

ECON-325: Social Choice and Economic Justice (3)

Conservative, liberal, and radical normative theories. Conflicts between efficiency, equity, and liberty. Major contemporary writers on the "just economy." Institutional constraints, the role of the market, voting paradoxes, and the nature of social choice; concepts of economic rationality; economic justice and contemporary policy. Meets with ECON-625. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-200.

 

ECON-332: Money, Banking, and Finance in the Global Economy (3)

Money, banking, and capital markets in a globalizing world. Includes central banking, monetary integration, currency competition, dollarization, electronic money, banking problems and policies in emerging market economies, developed and emerging capital markets, and appropriate polices for regulating global financial institutions. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-100.

 

ECON-341: Public Economics (3)

The theory of taxation, public expenditure, and fiscal policy. Comparison of fiscal institutions in the United States and abroad. Government approaches to income redistribution and poverty: negative income tax, family allowances, etc. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.

 

ECON-345: Introduction to Game Theory (3)

This course explores applications such as auctions, firm competition, and voting with mathematical analysis. It includes Nash equilibrium, subgame perfect equilibrium, evolutionary stability, repeated games, signaling, mechanism design, uncertainty, and behavioral game theory. Meets with MATH-345. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-200, and MATH-211 or MATH-221.

ECON-346: Competition, Regulation, and Business Strategies (3)

Historical and contemporary analysis of industrial market structures and of the behavior of business firms in the United States. The rise of large corporations, monopoly power and its effects on economic and social welfare, control over large corporations, and governmental regulation of business. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.

 

ECON-351: Comparative Economic Systems (3)

Analysis and comparison of different economic institutions as they affect economic democracy, efficiency, and equity. Case studies of the differences between the French, British, German, Swedish, and Japanese economies, and an evaluation of the historical experience of the formerly "socialist" economies. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.

 

ECON-353: Economic Transformation of Central/Eastern Europe (3)

Offered as a part of the AU Abroad Semester in Prague, this course introduces students to the challenges of transforming from a command economy to the free-market system. Surveys the particular problems and dilemmas faced by individuals and society in the region of Central/Eastern Europe and offers a framework to judge the present successes/failures and to estimate the future. Usually offered every fall.

 

ECON-358: Economics of the World Regions (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics course examines economic trends and economic policies in regions such as Africa, East Asia, or the Middle East. Focuses on distinctive economic institutions in the particular region, on the interdependencies within regions, and on the role of public policies in economic growth. Usually offered every semester. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.

 

ECON-361: Economic Development (3)

Survey of major issues related to the economics of developing countries in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Includes the meaning and measurement of economic development, theories of development and underdevelopment, and policies to alleviate poverty and promote development in the low-and middle-income countries of the world. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.

 

ECON-362: Microeconomics of Economic Development (3)

This course explores microeconomic issues in developing countries at a theoretical and empirical level. The focus is on poverty and income distribution, but also includes coordination failures, credit and labor market imperfections, microcredit, health, food security, human capital accumulation, gender, property rights, transaction costs, and economics of the household. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200. Note: ECON-300 or ECON-500 is recommended.

 

ECON-363: Macroeconomics of Economic Development (3)

An analysis of the macroeconomics of developing countries. The objective is to try to understand the rationale for and the effectiveness of different macroeconomic policies in a developing country setting. Includes exchange rates, monetary policy, fiscal policy, international trade, international capital markets, financial and exchange rate crises, structural adjustment, and related topics. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-301 or ECON-501.

 

ECON-370: International Economics (3)

Introduction to the economics of international trade and finance, including why countries trade, commercial trade policies and their effects, balance of payments and the economics of foreign exchange markets, and the operation and effects of fixed and flexible exchange rates. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.

 

ECON-371: International Economics: Trade (3)

Theories of international trade and competitiveness; the effects of trade on the economies of importing and exporting countries; analysis of the effects of tariffs and quotas and other nontariff barriers. Also includes multinational corporations, trade and development, customs, unions, and theory of the second best. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-300.

 

ECON-372: International Economics: Finance (3)

Determination of income, employment, and inflation in open economies; international impact of monetary-fiscal policies under fixed and flexible exchange rates; theories of exchange-rate determination; and international monetary organization and reform. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-301. STAT-202 is recommended.

 

ECON-373: Labor Economics (3)

The application of economic theory to current labor problems, domestic and foreign. Problems include wage theory and wage differentials, training policy, poverty, unemployment and underemployment, discrimination, productivity, industrialization, and union policies. Prerequisite: ECON-100, ECON-200, and ECON-300.

 

ECON-374: Gender Roles in the Economy (3)

Explores the gender dimensions of economic life. For economics majors, an in-depth look at the different roles of men and women in the community, the market, and within the household, and how these are affected by economic and social change. For women's studies and other social sciences majors, the discipline of economics is brought to bear on the study of women's and men's well-being and status in society. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.

 

ECON-379: Economics of Environmental Policy (3)

This course explores the relationship between economic activity and the natural environment from both neoclassical and ecological perspectives to understand the meaning and implications of sustainable development. Includes environmental protection, resource conservation, evaluation of environmental costs and benefits, and optimal management of natural resources. Also compares different policy approaches to regulating pollution and the exploitation of common property resources. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-100 and ECON-200.

 

ECON-383: Washington Economic Policy Semester Seminar I (4)

Intensive examination of economic policy making in Washington. Encompasses theoretical analysis of economic problems, extensive readings, on-site discussions with economic policy decision makers, preparation of papers, and presentation of alternative paradigms used to understand economic policy. Usually offered every term.

 

ECON-384: Washington Economic Policy Semester Seminar II (4)

Intensive examination of economic policy making in Washington. Encompasses theoretical analysis of economic problems, extensive readings, on-site discussions with economic policy decision makers, preparation of papers, and presentation of alternative paradigms used to understand economic policy. Usually offered every term.

 

ECON-385: Washington Economic Policy Semester Internship (4)

Experience in pursuing directed research with an organization directly involved in the field of economic policy. Usually offered every term.

 

ECON-390: Independent Reading Course in Economics (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

ECON-392: Cooperative Education Field Experience (3-9)

Prerequisite: permission of department chair and Cooperative Education office.

 

ECON-396: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

ECON-480: Senior Research Seminar (3)

Provides senior economics majors with experience in conducting research projects on important issues relevant to public policy. Includes presentations about research approaches and subjects, lectures by economists conducting policy research, a group project and an individual research project. Close consultation between the faculty member and students on the choice of research project and how best to conduct the research. Students present their findings to the class at the end of the term.

 

ECON-490: Independent Study Project in Economics (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

ECON-491: Internship (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

ECON-492: Internship in Teaching Economics (3)

Upper-level economics majors work with teaching faculty of large sections of introductory economics courses. Students direct review sessions, hold office hours, review homework assignments, and lead break-out sessions, and participate in a weekly seminar on the teaching of economics. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

ECON-496: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

ECON-500: Microeconomics (3)

Theory of resource allocation and price system; theory of demand, production, and distribution; and market structure and performance. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: ECON-300 or ECON-603, or permission of department.

 

ECON-501: Macroeconomics (3)

Keynesian model of income determination; consumption, investment, and interest rate theories; Keynesian and classical systems compared. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: ECON-505 (may be taken concurrently) and ECON-301 or ECON-603, or permission of department.

 

ECON-505: Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3)

Comparative static and comparative dynamic analysis of linear and nonlinear economic models. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: MATH-221 or equivalent.

 

ECON-523: Applied Econometrics I (3)

A review of probability, descriptive statistical inference, and hypothesis testing; basic bivariate and multivariate OLS models; non-linear regressions and interactions effects; heteroskedasticity and autocorrelation; and basic time-series modes. Includes an introduction to statistical software. Usually offered every spring.

 

ECON-524: Applied Econometrics II (3)

More advanced topics of econometrics, including time-series techniques; limited dependent variables models; sample selection and censoring; simultaneous equations; instrumental variables; fixed effects and panel methods; and program evaluation using quasi experimental data. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-523.

 

ECON-541: Public Economics (3)

Rationale for the existence of the public sector. Theory of public goods and taxation. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-500 or ECON-703, and ECON-501 or ECON-702.

 

ECON-546: Industrial Economics (3)

The structure of industrial markets and the behavior of business firms. Theoretical and empirical appraisal of welfare implications of alternative market structures and business behavior, both in the United States and abroad. Impacts of international influences on behavior of domestic firms. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-300 or ECON-500 or ECON-703.

 

ECON-547: Economics of Antitrust and Regulation (3)

Economic analysis of government policies affecting business behavior, with focus on the U.S. economy. In addition to antitrust (or competition) policy and traditional public utility regulation, price and entry regulation in transportation and service sectors, and social (health, safety, and environmental) regulations are also evaluated. Usually offered every summer. Prerequisite: ECON-300 or ECON-346 or ECON-500 or ECON-703.

 

ECON-551: Comparative Economic Systems (3)

A theoretical and historical evaluation of the effects of different economic institutions and their combinations on economic democracy, efficiency, and equity. Distinctive features of the French, British, German, Swedish, and Japanese economies, as well as the historical experience of the formerly "socialist" economies are emphasized. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-603; or ECON-300, ECON-500 or ECON-703; and ECON-301, or ECON-501 or ECON-702.

 

ECON-552: Economics of Transition (3)

Economic policy in formerly centrally planned economies that are attempting to introduce a market system. Review of the record of economies of the former Soviet Bloc. Emphasis is on applied policy issues such as privatization, freeing prices, property rights, and macroeconomic stabilization. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-603, or ECON-300 or ECON-500 or ECON-702, and ECON-301 or ECON-501 or ECON-703.

 

ECON-558: Economics of World Regions (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics course examines economic trends and economic policies in regions such as Africa, East Asia, or the Middle East. Focuses on distinctive economic institutions in the particular region, on the interdependencies within regions, and on the role of public policies in economic growth. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: ECON-300 and ECON-301, or ECON-500 and ECON-501, or ECON-603.

 

ECON-573: Labor Economics I (3)

Contemporary theories of wages, employment, and prices; collective bargaining; the effect of collective bargaining on wages in the American economy; theories and empirical studies of wage differentials. Usually offered every third semester. Prerequisite: ECON-500 or ECON-703 and ECON-501 or ECON-702.

 

ECON-574: Gender Perspectives on Economic Analysis: Microeconomics (3)

This course provides an introduction to gender analysis in micro and labor economics. It explores theories of the household and household bargaining and empirical research; conceptualization and measurement of the reproductive economy, care work and unpaid work; women146s participation in labor markets; assets and income distribution; gender, inequity, and poverty; and related social policy issues. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-500 or ECON-501.

 

ECON-575: Gender Perspectives on Economic Analysis:Macroeconomics(3)

This course provides an introduction to gender analysis in macroeconomics and public finance. It explores feminist theories of economic growth, gender-aware macroeconomic models, gender and recession/crisis; gender analysis of public finance including fiscal policy and the practice of gender budgets; gender, trade, and investment; gender and credit markets; and gender-aware macroeconomic, trade, and investment policies. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-500 or ECON-501.

 

ECON-579: Environmental Economics (3)

An analysis of the relationship between economic activity and the natural environment from both mainstream and ecological perspectives. Policy measures for regulating pollution and managing common property resources are explored, including emission taxes, tradable pollution permits, and property rights solutions. Applications to global environmental issues such as climate change and local environmental problems are emphasized. Students gain a understanding of the meaning of sustainable development and the types of policies required to active it. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-603 or ECON-500 or ECON-703.

 

ECON-590: Independent Reading Course in Economics (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

ECON-596: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

ECON-603: Introduction to Economic Theory (3)

The major analytical tools of price and income theory. No credit toward degrees in the Department of Economics. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: an introductory course in economics.

 

ECON-618: Economic History of Europe and the World (3)

Origins and development of capitalism in Western Europe. Impact of the rise of capitalism on the European periphery and the Third World. Emphasis on the use of political economic theory to explain different historical evolutionary paths. Usually offered every other spring. Prerequisite: ECON-500 or ECON-703, and ECON-501 or ECON-702.

 

ECON-619: United States Economic History (3)

The pace and structure of economic growth, the institutional transformations involved in economic development, and the social and economic consequences of economic change in the United States since colonial times. Focus is on a variety of causal models and methods for explaining economic and institutional change. Usually offered every other spring. Prerequisite: ECON-500 or ECON-703, and ECON-501 or ECON-702.

 

ECON-620: Economic Thought (3)

Major figures in the history of economic thought, their social and economic thought and tools of analysis they created. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-500 and ECON-501, or admission to PhD program.

 

ECON-625: Social Choice and Economic Justice (3)

Conservative, liberal, and radical normative theories. Conflicts between efficiency, equity, and liberty. Major contemporary writers on the "just economy." Institutional constraints, the role of the market, voting paradoxes, and the nature of social choice. Concepts of economic rationality. Economic justice and contemporary policy. Meets with ECON-325. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-500 or ECON-703.

 

ECON-630: Monetary Economics (3)

Relation of money and other financial assets to prices, output, and interest rates. Emphasis on the demand and supply of money and on government monetary policy. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-501 or ECON-702 and ECON-505 or ECON-705.


ECON-633: Financial Economics (3)

Institutional and theoretical aspects of creating, holding, and exchanging financial assets - money, credit instruments, and equities. The liabilities created by financial intermediaries and the role of government in financial markets. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-500 or ECON-703 and ECON-505 or ECON-705.

 

ECON-634: Development Finance and Banking (3)

Alternative approaches to understanding the role of finance and banking in economic development and analysis of the interaction between international and domestic capital markets, as well as between the formal banking sector and the informal financial sector of developing economies. The role of development banks, multilateral institutions, and governments in financial market operations. Examines the effect of financial policy reforms and regulations on the performance of financial markets. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-500 and ECON-501, which may be taken concurrently.

 

ECON-635: International Capital Markets (3)

A practical approach to the understanding of world financial markets, analyzing the borrowing and investment decisions faced by institutions in the context of globalized financial markets. Surveys the technical elements necessary for borrowers and investors to operate in the fixed income securities market. Examines the preparation, pricing, and placement of sovereign and public bond issues and related financial derivative instruments. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-630 or ECON-633 or FIN-614, or permission of instructor.

 

ECON-639: Policy Issues in Financial Economics (3)

Applications of the tools of finance to such public policies as government loan guarantees, insuring pensions, bank regulation and deposit insurance, discriminatory lending, and corporate ownership and management. Students make oral presentations and hear guest lectures by policymakers dealing with financial economic issues. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-500 or ECON-703.

 

ECON-661: Survey of Economic Development (3)

Major topics in the field of development economics with an emphasis on the evolution of the field since the mid-twentieth century. The course examines important topics in economic development and illustrates the application of economic techniques to development issues. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: ECON-603, or ECON-500 and ECON-501.

 

ECON-662: Development Microeconomics (3)

Examines the meaning and measures of economic development. Explores theoretical and empirical work of development issues at micro and meso levels. These include poverty traps, coordination failures, credit and labor market imperfections, microcredit and cooperatives, health, human capital accumulation, gender, population, property rights, and transaction costs, and the economics of the household. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-500 or ECON-703.

 

ECON-663: Development Macroeconomics (3)

Analysis of the macroeconomics of developing countries, including discussion of open-economy macroeconomics, exchange rates, monetary policy, fiscal policy, international trade, and related topics. The objective is to understand the rationale for and the effectiveness of different macroeconomic policies in a developing country setting. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-501 or ECON-702.

 

ECON-665: Project Evaluation in Developing Countries (3)

Primarily for graduate students interested in working with international development organizations, this course is an overview of the tools and approaches used to evaluate planned, on-going, or completed projects, programs, and policies in developing countries. Prerequisite: ECON-523.

 

ECON-670: Survey of International Economics (3)

International trade theory and international monetary economics primarily for graduate students in other departments. Emphasis on policy applications. Note: This course does not count toward the requirements for the PhD in Economics. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-603 or ECON-500 and ECON-501.

 

ECON-671: International Economics: Trade (3)

Classical, neoclassical, and alternative theories of the gains from trade and the determination of the pattern of trade. Analysis of the welfare effects of trade policies. Modern theories of trade with increasing returns and imperfect competition; strategic trade policy. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-505 or ECON-705, and ECON-500 or ECON-703.

 

ECON-672: International Economics: Finance (3)

International monetary economics and open-economy macroeconomics. Balance-of-payments adjustment, exchange rate determination, capital mobility, and the international monetary system. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-505 or ECON-705, and ECON-501 or ECON-702. Note: ECON-523 or ECON-723 are strongly recommended.


ECON-690: Independent Study Project in Economics (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

ECON-691: Internship (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

ECON-692: Cooperative Education Field Experience (3-6)

Prerequisite: permission of department chair and Cooperative Education office.

 

ECON-696: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

ECON-701: Micro Political Economy I (3)

Political economy methodology and alternate microeconomic theories, including determination of wage, price, profits and rent, the conflict theory of the firm, critical evaluation of markets and other coordination mechanisms, the economics of race, class, and gender, and collective action problems and the state. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-703 or permission of instructor.

 

ECON-702: Macroeconomic Analysis I (3)

Analysis of determinants of aggregate demand and supply and their interactions in closed and open economies. Theoretical and empirical analysis of sectoral relations including consumption, investment, government, foreign sector, and demand and supply for money. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-705 or admission to PhD program or permission of department. Note: concurrent enrollment in ECON-706 is recommended.

 

ECON-703: Microeconomic Analysis I (3)

Theories of demand, market structure and performance, production and distribution, cost and supply. Introduction to general equilibrium analysis. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: admission to PhD program or permission of department.

 

ECON-705: Mathematical Economic Analysis (3)

Mathematical analysis of economic theory and problems. Constrained maxima and minima, linear and nonlinear programming, elementary differential and difference equations, and economic applications. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: admission to the PhD program or permission of department.

 

ECON-706: Advanced Mathematical Economic Analysis (3)

Systems of difference and differential equations, dynamic optimization techniques such as calculus of variations and optimal control theory, and economic applications. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-705.

 

ECON-711: Theory of Political Economy (3)

Alternative theories of income distribution and economic growth (classical, neoclassical, neo-Marxian, neo-Keynesian, and neo-Kaleckian). Macroeconomic models in the post-Keynesian tradition are compared with mainstream neoclassical models. Includes causes of unemployment, conflicting claims inflation, endogenous money, saving and investment, financial crises, fiscal policy, technological change, long-run growth, and open economy extensions. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-702 (may be taken concurrently), ECON-705, or permission of instructor.

 

ECON-712: Macroeconomic Analysis II (3)

Recent developments in macrotheory (monetarist to new classical school) and macrodynamics, including theory of growth and fluctuation and theory of income distribution. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-702, and ECON-523 or ECON-723 (may be taken concurrently).

 

ECON-713: Microeconomic Analysis II (3)

An advanced treatment of general equilibrium; consumer theory, theory of the firm, moral hazard, and adverse selection; and welfare and public policy. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-703.

 

ECON-723: Econometric Methods (3)

Multivariate regression models and the variations on the standard model, including serial correlation, heteroskedasticity, multicollinearity, and stochastic regressors. Introduction to estimation and identification issues in simultaneous equation models. Use of regression software. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: STAT-502.

 

ECON-724: Advanced Econometric Methods (3)

Extension of econometric theory and applications, including maximum likelihood methods, asymptotic theory, introduction to panel-data and time-series issues. Assessment of econometric models and their use. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-723.

 

ECON-742: Seminar in Financial Economics and Public Policy (3)

Capstone seminar for the M.A. in Financial Economics and Public Policy. Building on ECON-639, students conduct research on current public policy problems dealing with the regulation of financial markets. Research subjects may include the design of deposit insurance programs, moral hazard and adverse selection in public insurance programs, credit rationing, lending discrimination and loan redlining practices, regulation of trade in derivative securities, and risk associated with international integration of payments systems. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-639.

 

ECON-774: Seminar in Economic Thought (3)

The history of economic thought with emphasis on problems of methodology and philosophy. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: ECON-620.

 

ECON-778: Seminar in Economic History (3)

Selected issues and research in American and European economic history. Prerequisite: ECON-618 or ECON-619.

 

ECON-779: Seminar in Environmental Economics (3)

Advanced issues in environmental economics theory and policy, with an emphasis on empirical methods for doctoral dissertation research. Prerequisite: ECON-500 and ECON-579, or permission of instructor.

 

ECON-781: Seminar in Empirical Political Economy (3)

Advanced theories of political economy, with emphasis on empirical methods for doctoral dissertation research. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-701 and ECON-711 and ECON-724.

 

ECON-782: Seminar in Empirical Macroeconomics (3)

Advanced macroeconomics and income theory with emphasis given to empirical implications and to econometric procedures available for testing these implications. Includes stylized facts about economic growth and business cycles and applications of time-series econometric techniques to macroeconomic concerns. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: ECON-711 or ECON-712.

 

ECON-783: Seminar in Empirical Microeconomics (3)

Advanced microeconomics and price theory with emphasis given to empirical implications and to econometric procedures available for testing these implications. Includes model specifications, diagnostic techniques, limited dependent variables, and panel data. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: ECON-701 or ECON-713.

 

ECON-784: Seminar in International Trade and Finance (3)

Advanced issues in international trade and finance. Seminar focuses on empirical research-oriented papers. Research paper is required. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ECON-671, ECON-672 (may be taken concurrently), and ECON-523, or ECON-723.

 

ECON-788: Seminar in Economic Development (3)

Research seminar involving an in-depth treatment of selected subjects. Research paper required. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ECON-662 or ECON-663.


 
ECON-799: Doctoral Dissertation Seminar (1-24)

May be taken pass/fail only.