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SETH | Courses

For current class offerings, times, and additional information, visit the Office of the Registrar.

EDU-096: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (0)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


EDU-205: Schools and Society 4:2 (3)

A multidimensional view of schools, teachers, and students. This social and intellectual foundation course serves as a basis for studying contemporary education and the issues of racism, sexism, finance, governance, innovations, and the social context of American education. The course includes lectures, discussion groups, cooperative learning, Internet activities, and independent projects. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite for General Education credit: ANTH-150 or PSYC-105 or SOCY-100 or WGST-125.


EDU-212: Methodology of Sign Language (3)

The principles of manual communication and some principles of American Sign Language (ASL) are introduced. Learning signs and gaining expressive and receptive skills are stressed. Usually offered every spring and fall.


EDU-240: Analysis of Experiential Learning (3)

A review of contemporary theories and research in adult development and learning that provides students with the context to identify, analyze, and synthesize prior experiential learning. Final product is a portfolio that documents such learning. Usually offered every term. May be taken pass/fail only. Prerequisite: enrollment limited to students in the AEL program.


EDU-250: Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers (3)

With EDU-251, a two-semester sequence for prospective elementary teachers. Extends the foundational ideas of mathematics and conceptual understanding of topics typically taught in elementary school classrooms, including numbers and numeration, fractions, decimals, ratio, proportion, and percents. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: completion of University Mathematics Requirement and EDU-320.


EDU-251: Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II (3)

With EDU-250, a two-semester sequence for prospective elementary teachers. Extends the foundational ideas of mathematics and conceptual understanding of topics typically taught in elementary school classrooms, including numbers and numeration, fractions, decimals, ratio, proportion, percents and integers. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: EDU-250.


EDU-280: Social Justice and Urban Education (3)

Analysis of the nature and impact of race, class, gender, and exceptionality in education. Emphasis on how schools have served as vehicles of oppression and opportunity for social groups in our society. Engagement in change agency to promote social justice in schools and society. Usually offered alternate falls.


EDU-285: Education for International Development 3:2 (3)

The conserving role of education as a socializing agent and the liberating role of education as an engine of change. Special attention is given to the social and economic impact of education in national development, especially in the Third World. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite for General Education credit: ECON-110 or GOVT-130 or HIST-120 or SIS-105 or SIS-110.


EDU-296: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


EDU-319: Children's Literature: Multicultural and International Approaches (3)

Exploration and critical analysis of multicultural and international children's literature from preschool to adolescence. Includes how contemporary issues are reflected in different genres, as well as marginalization, gender equity, social inequity, racism, and censorship. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-320: Psychology of Education (3)

Surveys the research literature on learning theories and human development with an emphasis on the role of educators. Includes focus on issues such as multicultural education, special education, evaluation, memory and cognition, and instructional design. Usually offered every term.


EDU-321: Field Experience: Observation and Analysis (1)

Observation and analysis of diverse school settings, examining philosophies, curriculum, and teacher and administrator roles, using informal and formal means of data collection with particular emphasis on classroom interactions. Usually offered every term. Note: may be taken pass/fail only.


EDU-330: Instructional Strategies and Teaching Methods (3)

An introduction to effective teaching strategies for prospective elementary teachers. Focus is on planning, implementing, and assessing teaching and learning. Issues of beliefs, practice, and reflection are emphasized. Students demonstrate teaching skills in clinical settings. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: EDU-205, EDU-320, and EDU-321.


EDU-362: Classroom Management (3)

Study of the instructional and behavioral components of classroom management. Students gain skills in assessing behavior problems, planning interventions, implementing various strategies, and evaluating the effectiveness of interventions. Special attention is given to diverse populations of students, including exceptional needs, different cultural backgrounds, English as a second language, and low socioeconomic status. Usually offered every fall and summer.


EDU-371: Foundations of Reading Instruction (3)


This course explores the fundamentals of literacy instruction. Attention is given to research that informs reading instruction, looking specifically at models and theories of reading over time. Special attention is given to constructing ways of supporting learners from diverse backgrounds, experiences, and abilities. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: EDU-205, EDU-320, and EDU-321.


EDU-390: Independent Reading Course in Education (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and SOE dean.


EDU-396: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


EDU-490: Independent Study Project in Education (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and SOE dean.


EDU-491: Internship in Education (3-9)

Students participate in the professional activities of selected educational organizations or agencies in the Washington, D.C. area. Students gain experience in nonteaching occupations that are integrally related to education and gain skills in educational research or program development and dissemination. Prerequisite: permission of director of internship program and SOE dean.


EDU-492: Service Learning in Teacher Education (1)


Students participate in school and community organizations and agencies. Exploration of the principles of service learning and application of classroom theory in the community. Special attention is paid to providing equitable learning environments. Students must complete a minimum of 40 hours in the community placement and attend three on-campus seminars. Usually offered every term.May be taken pass/fail only.
 


EDU-496: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.
 


EDU-499: Student Teaching (12)

Student teaching includes observation, planning, and conferences with cooperating teachers and university supervisors. Required bi-weekly seminars focus on relevant teaching and educational issues. Preparation of a professional portfolio for program completion is required. Students provide their own transportation. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: successful completion of appropriate methods courses, satisfaction of the SETH policy regarding ongoing assessment of academic and professional performance, and permission of SETH advisor. May be taken for A-F grade only.
 


EDU-502: Methods of Managing Pupils with Behavior Disorders (3)

Psycho-educational methods of understanding and managing inappropriate classroom behavior. Techniques such as groups, problem solving, role playing, and videotape analysis of behavior. Usually offered every fall and summer.
 


EDU-519: The Uses of Technology in Education (3)

An introduction to computer literacy focusing on the effective use of technology in teaching and educational management. The course emphasizes criteria for evaluating software; using technology for effective teaching; and applying technology to strengthen management systems. Also provides students hands-on experience with a broad range of software and practical experience in applying technology to teaching and management. Usually offered every fall.



EDU-520: Reading, Writing, and Literature across the Curriculum (3)


The focus of this course is on exploring and analyzing theories, models, and strategies for teaching reading, writing, and literature across the curriculum and how to integrate these in the content areas. Also addresses ways of supporting diverse learners throughout the course. Usually offered every spring.
 

EDU-521: Foundations of Education (3)

Exploration of philosophical, sociological, and political foundations of American education and inquiry into the role schools play in cultural production, maintenance, and transformation and what this means for diverse learners of all ages. Includes an examination of law and policies that affect children and families. Usually offered every term.


EDU-522: Principles of Effective Methods and Instruction (3)


An in-depth examination of the methods and competencies necessary for teaching, including instructional planning, writing objectives, lesson presentation, questioning, and feedback, interpersonal communication, instructional approaches, and assessment. The course explores the teacher's role as skilled practitioner and critical decision maker. Usually offered every term.
 


EDU-525: Principles of Educational Assessment and Testing (3)

This course provides an overview of assessment measures and processes used in educational settings, including standardized tests used for administrative and counseling purposes; test construction and criterion-referenced measurement for instruction; and issues such as authentic assessments and portfolios, ethical concerns, and the uses of tests for educational research. Usually offered every spring.
 


EDU-540: Methods, Materials, and Management in Secondary Education I

This course is the first in a two-part sequence designed to develop knowledge and understanding of effective instruction and classroom management in secondary education. The course addresses the methods, materials, and management of secondary school subjects. Includes laboratory experiences in the university classroom and area secondary schools as well as seminars, and analysis of practical experience with respect to current literature. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education program and permission of SOE adviser.
 


EDU-541; Foundations of Special Education for Exceptional Children (3)

This survey course examines students with diverse learning needs and effective programs designed to provide equitable education for all students. Exceptionalities of students with regard to cognitive, behavioral, and psychological/social differences are the focus of study. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-542: Methods, Materials, & Management in Secondary Education II

This course is the second in a two-part sequence designed to develop knowledge and understanding of effective instruction and classroom management in secondary education. The course focuses on the development of instructional methodologies, research skills, content area knowledge, and inquiry strategies used to understand assessment and evaluation in the classroom. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: EDU-540.


EDU-545: Overview of All Exceptionalities: The Arts in Special Education (3)

An experiential course treating a variety of handicapping conditions and introducing a panoply of art forms. Students learn to program for success in each art form by building on the abilities, strengths, and interests of each disabled person, systematically programming academic material into arts activities, and teaching socialization and life skills. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-551: Counseling Skills in Training and Development (3)

The development of basic counseling and interviewing skills needed to assist in individual development through the life span, with an emphasis on adult social, personal, and career development. Usually offered alternate falls.
 


EDU-552:Teaching Mathematics in Elementary Education (3)

Materials and methods for teaching mathematics to all learners. Emphasis on the analysis of current research and effective mathematics instruction. Practical application in the university classroom and in area elementary schools. Students provide their own transportation. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: EDU-200, EDU-250, EDU-319, EDU-320, EDU-321, EDU-330, EDU-362, EDU-371, and EDU-541 or EDU-545, admission to the Teacher Education program and permission of SOE advisor. Must be taken concurrently with EDU-553, EDU-554, EDU-555, and EDU-556.


EDU-553: Teaching Language Arts in Elementary Education (3)

Focuses on understanding language acquisition and literacy development. Emphasis is on current research in language arts theory and practice to support diverse learners. Practical application in local elementary schools. Students provide their own transportation. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: EDU-200, EDU-250, EDU-319, EDU-320, EDU-321, EDU-330, EDU-362, EDU-371, and EDU-541 or EDU-545, admission to the Teacher Education program and permission of SOE advisor. Must be taken concurrently with EDU-552, EDU-554, EDU-555, and EDU-556.


EDU-554: Teaching Social Studies in Elementary Education (3)


The focus of this course is on understanding how to support all learners through the use of various strategies, methods, and models for teaching social studies. Emphasis is on the analysis of current research in effective social studies teaching and learning. Practical application in local elementary schools. Students provide their own transportation. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: EDU-200, EDU-250, EDU-319, EDU-320, EDU-321, EDU-330, EDU-362, EDU-371, and EDU-541 or EDU-545, admission to the Teacher Education program and permission of SOE adviser. Must be taken concurrently with EDU-552, EDU-553, EDU-555, and EDU-556.


EDU-555: Teaching Reading in Elementary Education (3)

The focus of this course is on understanding how to support diverse learners through the use of various strategies, methods, and models for teaching reading. Emphasis is on exploring and analyzing current research in reading theory and practice. Field work and practice teaching in local schools. Students provide their own transportation. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: EDU-200, EDU-250, EDU-319, EDU-320, EDU-321, EDU-330, EDU-362, EDU-371, and EDU-541 or EDU-545, admission to the Teacher Education program and permission of SOE advisor. Must be taken concurrently with EDU-552, EDU-553, EDU-554, and EDU-556.
 


EDU-556: Teaching Science in Elementary Education (3)

Methods and materials for teaching science to all learners. Emphasis on inquiry, discovery, safety, and legal aspects. Field trips and practical application in local elementary schools. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: EDU-200, EDU-250, EDU-319, EDU-320, EDU-321, EDU-330, EDU-362, EDU-371, and EDU-541 or EDU-545, admission to the Teacher Education program and permission of SOE advisor. Must be taken concurrently with EDU-552, EDU-553, EDU-554, and EDU-555. 


EDU-560: Advanced Technology in Education (3)

Students gain hands-on experience with current and emerging applications including system server architecture, application programming, product development, and project evaluation. Emphasis on informed, data-based decision making as a guide to identification, purchase, and assessment of expert services and equipment, and development of skills to enact and administer specific solutions. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: EDU-519 or permission of instructor.


EDU-565: Gender and Cultural Diversity in School (3)

Combining both historical perspective and contemporary knowledge and skills, this course investigates the impact of bias in school. From the earliest colonial schools to contemporary classrooms, bias, selectivity, and access have been pervasive educational barriers. The course discusses both past issues and current challenges, bridging disparate groups and interests, and searching for commonalities and differences among racial, gender, class, ability, and ethnic concerns. Students undertake a social science investigation to add to the understanding of educational equity. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-590: Independent Reading Course in Education (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.


EDU-596: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


EDU-598: Comparative and International Education (3)

An examination of the ways in which education systems vary across regions and countries and the implications for international education. Emphasis is on how educational policy, capacity, governance, institution building, and practice are shaped by the contexts in which they are embedded. Includes globalization, access, equity, equality opportunity, and capacity building. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-601: Teaching Reading in the Elementary School (3)

This course focuses on understanding language acquisition, literacy development, and classroom teaching through the lens of cultural and linguistic diversity. Includes class discussion of strategies for teaching reading with practical application in local elementary schools. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-602: Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School (3)

This course focuses on understanding and applying recent theories and practices in language arts teaching and learning. Emphasis is on developing strategies that support diverse learners. Includes practical application in local elementary schools. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-603: Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (3)

Materials and methods for teaching mathematics to all learners. Emphasis is on analysis of current research and effective mathematics instruction. Includes hands-on interactive math activities and practical application in local elementary schools. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-604: Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3)

Strategies, materials, methods, and classroom management for teaching science in elementary schools. Examines pedagogy and best practices for effective science education for diverse learners. Includes practical application in local elementary schools. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-605: Methods of Psychoeducational Assessment for Learning Disabilities and Emotional Disturbance (3)

Develops the special educator's knowledge of critical issues and concepts in the use of standardized tests in psychoeducational assessment, theoretical and operational definitions of cognitive abilities and "intelligence" familiarity with a variety of achievement tests, and introductory practice in test administration and interpretation. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: EDU-645.


EDU-606: Theories & Methods in Diagnostic and Prescriptive Math (3)

Materials and methods for teaching mathematics to students with learning disabilities. Analysis of current reform models in curriculum, assessment, and instruction, including techniques of error analysis and flexible interviewing. Required tutorial experience. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-607: Research Seminar in Special Education (3)

A case study approach using interdisciplinary research with focus on a specific child with learning disabilities. Includes interviews with professionals working with the child, review of confidential files, and research from contemporary journals on remediation suggestions summarized in a comprehensive report. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.


EDU-608: Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School (3)

Focuses on understanding how to support all learners through the use of various strategies, methods , and modes for effective social studies teaching. Emphasis on the analysis of current research in effective social studies teaching and learning. Includes practical application in local elementary schools. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-609: Effective Teaching for Diverse Learners (3)

Through action research, students explore ways of organizing and managing classrooms to support diverse learners. Students engage in curriculum design and implementation across the curriculum, including instructional planning an using portfolios. The role that families, the community, and other professionals can play in assessment and curriculum planning are explored. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-610: Overview of Qualitative & Quantitative Research Strategies

An examination of research that informs theory and practice in international education. Emphases quantitative and qualitative research domains; analyzing, interpreting, and evaluating statistical and qualitative studies related to international education. Students design an action research project on an international educational problem of choice. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-611: Formative Ideas of Contemporary Education (3)

Analysis of turning-point social and educational thought and research instrumental in shaping modern educational institutions, their cultures, policies, and practices. Social ideas and educational research and philosophy are linked to institutional values, policy and practice, and to contemporary educational issues such as equity, multiculturalism, and global education. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-612: Equity and Educational Opportunity (3)

An inquiry into the meaning of educational equity, emphasizing equality of conditions and of outcomes and implications for education in different nations. Research perspectives on the relationships between social inequalities and educational opportunity relative to socioeconomic status, gender, and ethnicity, and the functions of schools as agents of cultural transmission. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-613: Cultural Factors in Higher Education (3)

Study of college students and their culture. Emphasis on assessment and evaluation of phenomena in the collegiate setting to gain insight into cultural dynamics that bear on student development. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-614: International Education Exchange: Policies and Practices (3)

An examination of international educational exchange, intercultural communication, and study abroad programs. Includes consideration of the design and administration of such programs and the linkages with capacity building and development in international education. Attention is given to the implications for the internationalization of U.S. education and for education ands development abroad. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-615: Education and Social Change (3)

This course assesses the broad social functions of education and the ways in which education advances social change as a transmitter of culture, agent for socialization and opportunity, and catalyst for individual and societal well being. Although the course emphasizes education and social changes in the United States, numerous comparisons are made to other societies and cultures. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-618: Human Growth and Development across the Life Span (3)

Exploration of human development and relations across the life span, with an emphasis on health and care for children with diverse linguistic, cultural, and physical needs. Includes inquiry into social and cultural learning processes from birth through age eight. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-619: Children's Literature: A Critical Literacy Perspective (3)

Exploration and analysis of children's literature from a critical literacy perspective, including an explanation of social issues such as marginalization, racism, and censorship, as reflected in different genre.


EDU-620: Theories of Educational Psychology and Human Development (3)

Surveys research literature in learning and human development with an emphasis on the role of educators as decision makers and change agents who are knowledgeable about diversity and multiculturalism. Emphasizes the role today's educators play on advancing knowledge about instructional technology, human relations, time management, principles of growth and development, and the processes of memory and cognition. Usually offered every term.


EDU-621: Topics in Social Science Research (1)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. An introduction to and basic skill acquisition in techniques used by social science researchers and practitioners, including undertaking ethnographic research, action research, strategies for field research, functioning as a change agent, etc. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: EDU-610 or permission of instructor.


EDU-622: Language and Literacy Learning (3)

In this course students explore the assumptions that underlie literary and literacy learning. Students examine how we make sense of the world through language, views of learning, the nature of knowledge, and views of literacy. Usually offered alternate springs.


EDU-623: Topics in Literacy Education (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Provides students with opportunities to study timely topics and issues in literacy education. Usually offered alternate springs.


EDU-624: Language, Schooling, and Nation-Building (3)

This team-taught (anthropology and education) course surveys recent research on nonstandard language and schooling in the context of post-colonial change. It considers how non-standard varieties of national languages as well as language traditions assigned lesser prestige by national language policies influence school performance and affect classroom practices in language arts, mathematics, and other content/instructional areas. Implications for non-print literacies and for other areas of nation-building after colonialism are also explored.


EDU-625: Advocacy and Leadership in Early Childhood Education (3)

The development of collaborative and mentorship skills to work effectively with families, communities, professionals in the field, and other adults in connection with early childhood education and schooling. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-627: Literacy Education Skills Institutes (1)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Usually offered every term.


EDU-628: Topics in Early Childhood Education (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics provide students the opportunity to study timely issues in early childhood education. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-629: National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Preparation (1-3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Provides guidance for teacher candidates as they complete personal assessments of their current practices and successfully completing a National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) portfolio. Usually offered every term.

EDU-631:Fundamentals of Management in Educational Organizations (3)

Overview of the general characteristics of organizations and organizational change, and the roles and tasks of managers, with emphasis on the distinctive nature of educational organizations. Analysis of the organizational issues faced in providing quality education, and the managerial and leadership skills necessary to operate effectively in educational organizations. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-632: Case Studies in Educational Management (3)


May be repeated once for credit; case studies must be different. A case-study approach to examining administrative, managerial, and leadership issues in educational institutions. The course focuses on developing problem solving skills through the analysis of specific incidents, programs, and practices.


EDU-633: Financing Educational Systems (3)

Principles and practices of financing public education programs at federal, state, and local levels. Taxes, bonds, budgets, purchasing systems, accounting systems, and other aspects of school business administration are covered. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-634: Education and Public Policy (3)

Examines the major public policy issues in American education: equity, excellence and efficiency. Emphasizes theories and techniques of policy analysis, including implementation strategies, cost/benefit analysis, and evaluation. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-635: Theory and Curriculum in Early Childhood Education (3)

This course focuses on theoretical models and teaching methods and strategies that deal specifically with young children and their learning in various areas of school curriculum. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-639: Effective Leadership Skills (3)

A theory-based, skills-oriented workshop for administrators, dealing with concepts of administrative effectiveness, administrative style awareness, style flexibility, situational diagnosis skills, and team skills. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-640: Rotating Topics in Adult and Experiential Learning (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Focuses on the experiences and participation of adults as learners. Topics include institutional responses to the increased participation of adults; instructional strategies and curriculum development for adult learners; the efficacy and implementation of experiential learning; and the concepts and practices of adult learning theory. Usually offered every term.


EDU-642: Training Program Design (3)

An introduction to the design and delivery of adult training programs, emphasizing the development of skills in a variety of training components: needs assessment, goals and objectives, training methodologies and materials, and evaluation. This course is equally appropriate for novice trainers or those with previous experience. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-644: Language Development and Remediation (3)

How does one learn to use language to express thoughts and feelings? How does one teach a learning-disabled child to communicate effectively? This course discusses the developmental sequence of language learning, the nature of language disorders, diagnostic assessment of language disorders, and remedial techniques. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-645: Learning Disabilities I (3)

Examines neurological and developmental aspects of learning disabilities. Gives an overview of the field, emotional and social implications of learning disabilities, and how current brain research can impact teaching and counseling this population. Emphasis is on seeking the strengths of the child or adult with learning disabilities, how to foster the different intelligences, and informally diagnose the weaknesses. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.


EDU-646: Learning Disabilities II (3)

Develops diagnostic capabilities in order to select and design materials and programs for learning-disabled children and youth. Diverse methods of teaching are introduced. Special problems of learning-disabled adolescents and adults are studied in depth. Postsecondary education, career awareness, and career development approaches and programs are represented. Counseling techniques for parents and mainstream teachers are also addressed. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: EDU-645.


EDU-647: Global and Multicultural Education (3)

This course deals with the role of American education in an interdependent world, examining both the multicultural character of American classrooms and the international dimensions of the American school curriculum. It explores such issues as ethnocentrism, empathy, and global awareness, including an analysis of educational materials and methods useful in treating these issues. A special emphasis is placed on developing skills for cross-cultural understanding and communication. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-648: Education and Development: Sector Analysis (3)

Examines education as a social institution that both reflects and influences social, economic, and political life in nation states and globally. Emphasizes the role of education as an engine for change in the Third World. Organized around a logical framework of analysis, sometimes called the Sector Assessment Format, this course analyzes and compares educational systems by examining issues of access, equity, international efficiency, quality, and external efficiency. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-649: Nonformal Education and Development (3)

An examination of the role of nonformal education in the economic, social, and political development of developing nations. Specifically, the course deals with out-of-school programs in adult education, literacy, health, family planning, agriculture, nutrition, and community development. Case materials from several countries are used to study the issues and techniques involved in human resource development. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-662: Classroom Management (3)

Study of the instructional and behavioral components of classroom management. Students gain skills in assessing behavior problems, planning interventions, implementing various strategies, and evaluating the effectiveness of interventions. Special attention is given to diverse populations of students, including exceptional needs, different cultural backgrounds, English as a second language, and low socioeconomic status. Usually offered every fall and summer.


EDU-666: Legal Issues in Education (3)

For advanced graduate students. Study of student-institution relationship, institutional judicial systems, student rights, records, and due-process issues. Usually offered in alternate years.

EDU-671: Foundations of Reading: Diagnosis and Remediation (3)

Broad considerations underlying the teaching of reading with emphasis on reading disability and problems of the disabled reader. Usually offered every fall and summer.


EDU-683: Curriculum Design for the Classroom (3)

An exploration and analysis of the foundation of design and development of curriculum from pre-K through 16. Students study the impact of policy on curriculum and analyze various components of design and delivery in the classroom.


EDU-685: Proseminar in International Education (3)

Students draw on, consolidate, and extend their knowledge and research and analytical skills in the development of a capstone project of choice. The course provides group planning and support and guided individualized study. Emphases on topic or problem formation; argument development; research questions; methodological perspectives. Students must be in their final year of the International Training and Education program (ITEP), and have clarified preliminary ideas with an ITEP advisor prior to enrolling. Usually offered every term. May be taken pass/fail only.

EDU-687:Analysis of Instruction and Supervision (3)

This course examines the impact of varying types of direct support, approaches to supervision, instructional coaching, mentoring, and induction on teacher development. The course provides instructional leaders with practical guidance and support as they work with teachers to improve classroom teaching and learning. Students explore teacher effectiveness through the lens of local and national standards. Emphasis is placed on developmental or collaborative supervision, the role of professional teaching standards in teacher development, research based approaches to instruction, and providing practical applications for structured helping relationships.


EDU-690: Independent Study Project in Education (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.


EDU-693: Personnel and Program Evaluation (3)

Develops the systematic skills needed to conduct evaluations of training and development programs in various educational and organizational settings. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-696: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


EDU-699: Student Teaching (6)

Student teaching includes observation, planning, and conferences with cooperating teachers and university supervisors. Required bi-weekly seminars focus on relevant teaching and educational issues. Preparation of a professional portfolio for program completion is required. Students provide their own transportation. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: successful completion of appropriate methods courses, satisfaction of the SETH policy regarding ongoing assessment of academic and professional performance, and permission of SETH advisor. May be taken for A-F grade only.


EDU-713: Advanced Training Program Design (3)

This course models a variety of types of training such as diversity, health/behavior change, literacy, conflict resolution, small business, and youth and/or outbound bound training. It focuses on skills building and discussion of strategies for co-facilitation, difficult participants, and misinformed needs analysis. The course is structured as a training practicum' though which students develop and conduct training exercises that are video taped and critiqued through class discussion. Prerequisite: EDU-642 or permission of instructor or program director.


EDU-719: The Uses of Technology in Education (3)

An introduction to computer literacy focusing on the effective use of technology in teaching and educational management. The course emphasizes criteria for evaluating software; using technology for effective teaching; and applying technology to strengthen management systems. Also provides students hands-on experience with a broad range of software and practical experience in applying technology to teaching and management. Meets with EDU-519. Usually offered every fall.


EDU-760: Advanced Technology in Education (3)

Students gain hands-on experience with current and emerging applications including system server architecture, application programming, product development, and project evaluation. Emphasis on informed, data-based decision making as a guide to identification, purchase, and assessment of expert services and equipment, and development of skills to enact and administer specific solutions. Meets with EDU-560. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: EDU-719 or permission of instructor.


EDU-765: Seminar in Educational Leadership (3)

Analysis and integration of major theoretical approaches of educational leadership. Emphasis is on current research about educational leadership and critical examination of current issues and problems facing educational leaders. Usually offered every spring.


EDU-789: Qualitative Research in Education (3)

Analysis of and practice in the design and development of qualitative educational research. Emphasizes the nature and function of educational research; the epistemological, social, and value assumptions and issues in educational research; the nature and function of specific approaches to qualitative research; attributes of exemplary qualitative research in education; and ethical concerns and principles. Usually offered every summer. Prerequisite: EDU-610.


EDU-790: Quantitative Research in Education (3)

Analysis of and practice in the design of quantitative educational research. Emphasizes the nature and function of quantitative data gathering and analysis and the statistical approaches and techniques utilized to obtain particular outcomes. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: EDU-610.


EDU-792: In-Service Training Project: Internship in Education (3-9)

Internships in cooperating school systems, colleges and universities, and other agencies and organizations as an integral part of degree programs in the School of Education. Usually offered every term.


EDU-796: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


EDU-797: Master's Thesis Seminar (1-6)



EDU-798: Proseminar in Education (1-2)

School of Education full-time faculty present their own research to doctoral students to demonstrate both the variety of disciplinary and methodological approaches to educational research, and to indicate the areas of their current research. Sessions are also devoted to a review of research and statistical methodologies. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: admission to Ph.D. in Education, or master's students with permission of dean. Note: may be taken pass/fail only.


EDU-799: Doctoral Dissertation Seminar (1-9)

Students with approved dissertation proposals continue their research, analysis, and writing in a learning environment which provides faculty supervision and peer support. Emphases include editing, organization, and analytic and interpretive techniques to complete a dissertation. Students may enroll for up to 3 credit hours prior to the dissertation proposal. May be taken pass/fail only. Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy.


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