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CLALS | Tinker Field Research Grants

Tinker Field Research Grants are awarded by the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies to American University master's or doctoral level students to support preliminary field research in Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking Latin American and Caribbean countries (excluding Puerto Rico). Grants are intended to provide the opportunity to develop research projects and conduct hands-on field research for the first time. Funding can only be allocated to support exploratory work that will inform preparation of a PhD dissertation, a Master’s thesis, or a substantial research paper. The awards are not intended for advanced dissertation research. Tinker grants cover primarily travel expenses for short (three weeks to four months) periods of investigation in Latin America. Priority is given to PhD candidates, but grants will be allocated to students pursuing other graduate degrees.

In compliance with Tinker Foundation policies, CLALS did not hold a research grant competition during Academic Year 2015-2016.

Past Recipients

2015 Awardees

  • Kara Andrade (Ph.D. student in the School of Communication): “Emerging Uses Of ICTS for Creating New Forms of Civic Participation and Accountability in Guatemala”
  • Cristiane Bena Dias (Ph.D. student in the Washington College of Law): “Environmental Impact Assessment in Brazil: What needs to be changed?”
  • Elizabeth Geglia (Ph.D. student in Anthropology, College of Arts and Sciences): “Corporate Zones and Local Governance: The Impacts of ‘Model City’ Development in Honduras”
  • Kenneth Leon (Ph.D. student in Justice, Law and Criminality, School of Public Affairs): “Program Evaluation of the Plan Nacional de Vigilancia Comunitaria (PNVCC): A Study of the Colombian national Police”
  • Abby Lindsay (Ph.D. student in Global Environmental Policy, School of International Service): “Multiscalar Complexities of Urban Water Politics: the role of scientific and technical knowledge”
  • Luciano Melo (Ph.D. student in Government, School of Public Affairs): “Democratic Enclaves in Non-Democratic Regimes”

2014 Awardees

  • Erik Alda (Ph.D. student in Justice, Law and Criminology, School of Public Affairs): “Measuring the Efficiency of the Police Force in Central America: A Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA) Approach”
  • Maya Barak (Ph.D. student in Justice, Law and Criminology, School of Public Affairs): “A Reciprocal Approach to Legal Consciousness and Procedural Justice: A Study of United States Removal of Guatemalan and Salvadoran Immigrants”
  • Amberly A. Ellis (M.F.A. student in Film and Media Arts, School of Communication): “Recent Cuban Cinema: Cultural Policy, Race and Religion”
  • Leah A. Germer (M.A. student in Global Environmental Politics, School of International Service): “The Effects of the Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agreement on the Costa Rican Pork Sector”
  • Olivia Gilmore (M.A. student in Global Environmental Politics, School of International Service): “Participatory Water Management for Conflict Prevention: The Tarumã-Açu River Basin Committee, Amazonas, Brazil”
  • Laura S. Jung (Ph.D. student in Anthropology, College of Arts and Sciences): “Survival Strategies: How Rural Hondurans Negotiate Relationships with Foreign Medical Brigades to Improve Health Outcomes”
  • Carlos Martínez Ruiz (Ph.D. student in History, College of Arts and Sciences): “Making the Nation, Shaping Selves: Epidemics, Bio-Medical Interventions, and Resistance in Perú”
  • Katie Sizemore (M.A. student in International Peace and Conflict Resolution, School of International Service): “Conflict Resolution and Crime: The 2012 Gang Truce in El Salvador”
  • Laura Daniela Stevens León (Ph.D. student in Government, School of Public Affairs): “Uniting Behind Presidential Bills Even in a Divided Congress: Evidence from Mexico’s National and Subnational Legislatures”

2013 Awardees

  • Michael Baney (M.A. student in International Peace and Conflict Resolution, School of International Service): “The Word of Sendero: Shining Path’s Use of El Diario in Lima”
  • Jacquelyn Dolezal (M.A. student in Language and Foreign Studies, College of Arts and Sciences): “’Antes no era asi’ – Oral Histories of Young Adults in Monterrey, Mexico”
  • Emma Fawcett (Ph.D. student in International Relations, School of International Service): “Tourism as a Mechanism for Economic Development: Cuba and the Dominican Republic”
  • Sonja E. Kelly (Ph.D. student in International Relations, School of International Service): “’Banking the Bottom’: The Financial Inclusion Policy and Regulation Network in Chile, 1990-2005”
  • Katy Lackey (M.A. student in Global Environmental Politics, School of International Service): “Shifting the Paradigm: Sustainable Stormwater Management for Climate Change Adaptation”
  • Rachel Nadelman (Ph.D. student in International Relations, School of International Service): “Sitting on a Gold Mine: Social Movement Strategies for Fighting the New Gold Rush”
  • Leah E. Stonefield (M.A. student in Global Environmental Politics, School of International Service): “How Do Water Resource Vulnerabilities in Peru Contribute and Translate to Social Unrest: Implications for Water Management Strategies to Increase Security”

2012 Awardees

  • Brian D’Haeseleer (Ph.D. student in History, College of Arts and Sciences): “Examining the United States’ Counterinsurgency Efforts during the Salvadorian Civil War”
  • Adam Fenner (Ph.D. student in History, College of Arts and Sciences): “The Path to Favor: Tiburcio Carias Andino and the United States, 1923-1941”
  • Milagros Haro (M.A. student in International Development, School of International Service): “Examining Community-Based Approaches to Reduce the Incidence of Child Labor In Ciudad Vieja, Guatemala”
  • Douglas Keillor (J.D./M.A. student, Washington College of Law and School of International Service): “Field Research into the Scope and Causes of Excessive Pretrial Detention of Juveniles”
  • Lindsey Murphy (M.A. student in Language and Foreign Studies, College of Arts and Sciences): “Performance in Social Movement: Staging Student Protest in Chile”
  • Jennifer Yelle (Ph.D. student in Government, School of Public Affairs): “Violence and Justice in Mexico”
  • Sonia Saini (M.A. student in Global Environmental Politics, School of International Service): “Sustaining Sustainability: Seeds and Agrobiodiversity in a Changing Cuba”
  • Paula Silveira Orlando (Ph.D. student, School of Communications): “Exploring the Relation Between Media and Women’s Movements in Brazil”
  • Justine Strom (M.A. student in Language and Foreign Studies, College of Arts and Sciences): “The Role of the Catholic Church in El Salvador: Defender of Human Rights?”
  • Marcela Torres (Ph.D. student in Government, School of Public Affairs): “Politics of Identity in the Amazon: Similarities and Differences in Peru and Bolivia”
  • Tatiana Ware (Ph.D. student in International Relations, School of International Service): “The Grammar of Poverty”
  • Lydia White (M.A. student in Comparative and Regional Studies, School of International Service): “Central American Migrants in Mexico: Assessing and Responding to New Risks”

2011 Awardees

  • Hope Bastian Martinez (Ph.D. student in Anthropology, College of Arts and Sciences): “Economic Restructuring, State Discourse, and the Forging of a New Revolutionary Subject: An Ethnography of Everyday Life in Contemporary Cuba”
  • Aaron Bell (Ph.D. student in History, College of Arts and Sciences): “The Republican Party, ARENA, and the Future of El Salvador”
  • Karinna Berrospi (M.A. student in International Relations, School of International Service): “Determinants of Chilean Foreign Direct Investment into Peru”
  • Sebastian Bitar (Ph.D. student in International Relations, School of International Service): “Subordinate Sovereignty: International Hierarchy and Domestic Politics”
  • Rachel Cantave (Ph.D. student in Anthropology, College of Arts and Sciences): “The Color of Faith: Racial Politics and Pentecostalism in Bahia, Brazil”
  • Jeanna Cullinan (Ph.D. student in Public Administration, School of Public Affairs): “Municipal Police Reform in Mexico and the Problem of Trust”
  • Lindsay Shade (M.A. student in Global Environmental Politics, School of International Service): “Grassroots Alternatives to Neoliberal Development in Northwest Ecuador: Post-Development in Practice”