JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

JLC-496
Selected Topics:Non-Recurring

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

JLC-496
001
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
FALL 2018 REGULAR TERM

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics:Non-Recurring

Social Justice Movements

Social Justice Movements (3) This course examines social justice movements in the United States and the strategies therein for successful execution. The movements highlighted in the course include the Civil Rights Movement, the Women's Rights movement, the Asian American movement, and the Chicano movement, among others. The course also examines the roles of the law, politics, and movement actors in implementing the social justice needs at the core of the identified movements. Meets with JLC-696 002.

JLC-496
001
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2018 REGULAR TERM

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics:Non-Recurring

Refugee and Asylum Policy

Instructional Method: Online. Refugee and Asylum Policy (3) This course begins with a focus on U.S. asylum and refugee policy, then focuses on two issues: national security considerations, and refugee policies in comparative perspective. Students learn to differentiate between the legal categories of refugee versus asylum seeker; understand the challenges of balancing human security with national security; and grasp how other countries have responded to large influxes of refugees/asylum seekers. Meets with JLC-696 001.

JLC-496
002
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2018 REGULAR TERM

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics:Non-Recurring

Criminalization of Migration

Instructional Method: Online. Criminalization of Migration (3) This course explores "crimmigration," a term which refers to the intersection of the criminal justice system with the immigration legal system. The course first focuses on the evolution of U.S. immigration policies and the concomitant increase in immigration detention centers, criminal sanctions for immigration-related infractions, and policing of immigrant communities. The course then analyzes global crimmigration trends, with particular emphasis on how states' migration control mechanisms have affected human smuggling, human trafficking, and human security. Course readings highlight how immigrants have mobilized to fight for legal rights and protection, as well as how they have described their immigration experiences. Meets with JLC-696 002.

JLC-496
003
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2018 REGULAR TERM

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics:Non-Recurring

Illicit Econ in Global Persp

Instructional Method: Online. The Illicit Economy in a Global Perspective (3) This course focuses on patterns of illegal activity in the international economy. Students study phenomena such as illegal trade in arms, drugs, conflict minerals, and the trafficking and smuggling of human beings. The course introduces students to the systematic analysis of the illicit global economy. They are taught to utilize a political economy approach to examine the causes of illicit markets, the actors involved (the entrepreneurs and consumers), and how markets respond to efforts to combat them. Meets with JLC-696 003.

JLC-496
005
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2018 REGULAR TERM

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics:Non-Recurring

Ethics of Punishment

Instructional Method: Online. Ethics of Punishment (3) This course serves as an overview of philosophical arguments for and against the social practice of punishment. The class explores various justifications, including utilitarianism (incapacitation and rehabilitation), retribution, moral reform as well as arguments for the abolition of punishment and alternatives to punishment, such as restorative justice. The course familiarizes students with relevant arguments from great thinkers like Kant, and invites them to rethink how, why, and whether we punish those who break the law. Meets with JLC-696 005.

JLC-496
006
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2018 REGULAR TERM

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics:Non-Recurring

Civil Resistance and the Law

Instructional Method: Online. Civil Resistance and the Law (3) In many ways, the strategic use of nonviolence (aka civil resistance) in political conflicts is fundamentally linked to the creation and application of law. Law can motivate, mitigate, expand, or resolve these conflicts in important ways. In this course students learn about the concepts and principles of civil resistance and how they directly and indirectly relate to various aspects of law, both in the United States and abroad. They undertake projects and assignments, including a week-long simulation of a potential coup attempt, where they investigate, assess, analyze, and synthesize knowledge about the connections between civil resistance and the law in both historical and contemporary political conflicts. Meets with JLC-696 006.

JLC-496
001
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SPRING 2019 SEMESTER

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics:Non-Recurring

Sex Work, Policy, and the Law

Sex Work, Policy, and the Law (3) This course looks at the evolution of law and policy surround the criminalization and decriminalization of sex work/prostitution. The course explores the intersection of sex work with crime and victimization (particularly sex trafficking), public health, racial and ethnic disparities, women's rights, and transgender rights. Meets with JLC-696 001.

JLC-496
002
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SPRING 2019 SEMESTER

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics:Non-Recurring

Policing Practicum

Policing Practicum (3) This course addresses critical issues in U.S. policing using a client-based approach. Students gain practical experience while providing policy benefits to the Baltimore Police Department (BPD), which faces significant challenges including enhancing community trust and reducing violent crime. Students meet with BPD leadership to discuss the critical issue selected and work regularly with BPD officers throughout the semester. Activities include researching potential solutions and developing actions BPD can take to address a designated issue with final recommendations presented to the Police Commissioner. Permission: instructor. Meets with JLC-696 005.