Kogod Faculty Directory

Visit the academic department pages for more information on department chairs, adjunct faculty and associated professors.

Faculty profiles contain a biography, contact information and a listing of courses taught by each professor. Kogod faculty respond to the contact information provided in their individual profiles. Please check the profile's current office hours before reaching out, as hours may vary by semester and location.

To request an interview for a news story, call AU Communications at 202-885-5950 or submit a request.

Photo Credit: @Doug88888

The Latin American Initiative at Brookings compiled a guide to the tourism and travel industry in Cuba. As Cuba enjoys its new status as a trophy destination, the Cuban government has recognized tourism as a strategic sector of the economy in its 2030 Vision Plan. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the Cuban government's policies toward international tourism since the 1959 revolution. It analyzes the challenges to meeting the government's objectives, explores the organization of the tourism industry in Cuba, and outlines policy options for both Cuba and the United States to help foster growth in Cuba's tourism industry.

Link to full text via Brookings

Havana, A Tourist Capital

By Katheryn Felipe González (Granma, May 5, 2016)

Felipe González discusses the 60th Annual World Tourism Organization Regional Commission on the Americas meeting held in Havana in May of 2016 in conjunction with 36th edition of the Cuba's International Tourism Fair, emphasizing the recent increases in travel to Cuba as well as noting the emphasis placed by Minister of Tourism Marrero on the important role of the booming non-state sector in the tourism industry. Marrero also announced new strategies to implement standards for the domestic tourism industries as well as the restoration and updating of facilities and opening 2,500 new rooms on the island. Marrero noted that in 2015 tourism brought in about 2.8 billion dollar of direct income to the Cuban economy.

Link to full text via Granma

Cuba: U.S. Restrictions on Travel and Remittances

By Mark P. Sullivan (Congressional Research Service, April 10, 2015)

Since Cuba's establishment as a communist state, the U.S. government has placed sanctions, including travel restrictions, on the island in an effort to isolate it from the rest of the world. This report examines developments in U.S. policy restricting travel and remittances to Cuba, including significant changes that have occurred, current permissible travel and remittances, enforcement of the travel restrictions, and debate on lifting the travel restrictions.

Download the full text

U.S.-Cuba Academic and Science-Based Exchanges

by Stephen Johnson (Center for Strategic and International Studies, August 2012)

Johnson calls for an open exchange of academic information with Cuba to promote advances in several areas of study. Although Cuba is a closed society, the authors point out that past relationships between the United States and other restricted nations such as North Korea and Iran proved to be mutually beneficial. Based on historic relations with Cuba, the author believes that an open educational dialogue would catalyze advances for both U.S. and Cuban scholars.

Link to full text via CSIS

Reaching Out to the Cuban People

(The White House, January 2011)

In 2011 President Obama eased travel restrictions with Cuba to increase contact between Cuban civil society and those living in the United States. The President asks to continue the embargo, while allowing charter flights for purposeful travel from the United States to Cuba.

Download the full text

Letter from Cuban Citizens to the United States Congress

Cuban Civil Society (Intramuros blog, May 2010)

Cuban citizens sent the letter below to Congress, encouraging them to remove the travel ban. The letter reminds the Congress members that there are many non-profit organizations, constituencies, and human rights councils concerned with Cuban isolationism. By easing travel restrictions, the signatories of this letter hope to promote development and to curtail governmental repression.

Link to full text via Intramuros

Fact Sheet: Reaching Out to the Cuban People

(The White House, April 2009)

President Obama's plan to modernize and globalize Cuba by removing travel restrictions and limits on remittances while adding telecommunications technology and an improved diplomatic relationship with their leaders is detailed here. This fact sheet also lists advisories and changes to policy regarding travel to Cuba.

Download the full text

Promoting Democracy and Human Rights in Cuba

(The White House, April 2009)

The White House releases Obama's plan to promote contact between the United States and Cuba through the removal of travel restrictions and limitations on remittances.

Download the full text

Vacation Over: Implications for the Caribbean of Opening U.S.-Cuba Tourism

by Rafael Romeu (International Monetary Fund Working Paper, July 2008)

Rafael Romeu considers the ramifications of opening Cuba to tourism. He claims that U.S. tourism to Cuba would threaten other Caribbean nations' that are economically dependent on U.S. travelers.

Link to full text via IMF

Retreat from Reason

(Latin American Working Group, September 2006)

This position paper from the Latin American Working Group criticizes the George W. Bush administration's stringent policies towards Cuba and Cuban-American immigrants. Despite harsh restrictions, the authors point to academic relationships between scholars of the two nations as a sign of cooperation and the promise of an eventual restored relationship.

Download the full text

Economic Benefits to the United States from Lifting the Ban on Travel to Cuba

by Ed Sanders and Patrick Long (Cuba Policy Foundation, 2002)

Sanders and Long explore the potential economic benefits to the United States that would result from easing trade and travel restrictions with Cuba. Considering three different scenarios, the report gives both conservative and high estimates about the probability of mutual economic growth.

Download the full text

Cuban-American Cuba Visits: Public Policy, Private Practices

by Susan Eckstein and Lorena Barberia (Email, January 2001)

Survey results from first- and second-generation Cuban immigrants to the U.S. indicate a generation gap concerning visitation, aid, and government relations between the United States and Cuba. According to the researchers' findings, first-generation immigrants are much more likely to oppose an open relationship with Cuba for moral and political reasons. In contrast, their children have fewer moral qualms about traveling to Cuba and are more likely to support a normalized relationship.

Download the full text

Cuba Sanctions Resource Center

(U.S. Department of the Treasury)

The Cuba Sanctions Resource Center includes guides to Frequently Asked Questions about the Changes to the Cuba Sanctions, Sanctions Brochures, Specific Guidance on the Cuba Sanctions, Fact Sheet on Recent Changes to the Cuba Sanctions, and Interpretative Guidance formulated by the Department of the Treasury.

Link to full text via the U.S. Department of the Treasury

Whatever major students choose, they acquire a solid foundation in the liberal arts and pursue in-depth study in their chosen fields.

Faculty at AU are both world-class academics and serious practitioners. Our professors teach, mentor, and invest in the success of every student.

Biotechnology
Examine purpose, create efficiencies, improve well-being, and ensure effective product development--all by studying science, one of the fastest growing career fields. Work at the intersection of science, business, and policy, and gain a foundation for graduate studies. This seminar is offered during the day, 1-day per week.

Diplomacy, Defense, & Development
If you are interested in or are currently working in the fields of diplomacy, security, or international development in Washington, DC, then you can gain experience and applicable skills in negotiation, cultural competence, program development, grant writing, and more-all while studying policy and the U.S. role on the global stage. This seminar is offered during the evening, 1-day per week.

Global Business & Trade
Today's age of globalization brings with it new ways of doing business. Learn about the importance of generating jobs, accelerating economic growth, and advancing standards of living throughout the developed and developing world. This seminar is offered during the day, 1-day per week.

International Affairs
What could be better than studying international relations in one of the most important political and global cities in the world? Culture, economics, conflict, and power are all issues influencing international policy-making and this is your opportunity to be part of the conversation. This seminar is offered during the day, 1-day per week.

Sports Management & Media
You will be exposed to many facets of sports management and media, including business administration, sports marketing, media coverage and media relations, union representation and even team management and sponsorships. You will meet many of the professionals who make Washington a global sports center and who are doing innovative work in the field of sports. This seminar is offered during the day, 1-day per week.

U.S. Politics & Policy
How does Washington, DC really work? Learn the inside scoop from lobbyists, journalists, and congressional staffers. Take advantage of the city's wealth of networking opportunities as you discover the ins and outs of Capitol Hill and the Federal Government. This seminar is offered during the day, 1-day per week.

Time for a movie night? The Music Library has many great film musicals on DVD. Browse our collection online and then stop in to borrow a film!

American University
Washington, DC

Memorandum October 28, 2018

To:
AU Community
From:
Sylvia M. Burwell, President
Subject:
Response to PIttsburgh Shootings

We are deeply saddened by the shocking and senseless acts of violence that occurred yesterday at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Squirrel Hill, Pennsylvania. Media reports are calling this the worst single attack on American Jews in the history of this country and it follows a slew of hate crimes and anti-Semitic incidents over the past several years targeting Jewish communities. We extend our heartfelt condolences to the victims and their families, as well as to the AU students, alumni, staff, and faculty who are hurt and grieving from the impact of this attack.

There will be a prayer vigil at the Kay Spiritual Life Center tomorrow, Monday, October 29, at 3:00 p.m., to grieve, support each other, and offer our solidarity to those affected by this terrible crime.

Acts of unimaginable hate like these bring about many emotions, including anger, fear, confusion, and sadness. If you would like to talk with someone about this, I urge you to seek support during the week by contacting the AU Counseling Center (202-885-3500; Mary Graydon Center, Room 214) for an appointment or stop by during their drop-in hours from 2:00-4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. You can also reach out to Jason Benkendorf of AU Hillel (202-885-3322; jasonb@american.edu.)
 
Chaplains in the Kay Spiritual Life Center (202-885-3320) are available to assist community members as well, especially those in the Jewish community. Students who live in a residence hall can reach out any time to their Community Director or Resident Assistant, including nights and weekends, or visit the residence hall community desk for assistance. For academic issues, students may also talk with their academic advisor or stop by the Dean of Students Office (202-885-3300) during drop-in hours on Mondays and Fridays from 2-4 p.m. Faculty and staff can access support through the Faculty and Staff Assistance Program (202-885-2593).

While this unspeakable tragedy has shocked and saddened us all, it is also an opportunity to remind ourselves of values that we hold dear at American University—mutual understanding and respect, support, and most of all, compassion.
 
Elie Wiesel said, “There may be times when we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest.” Today, all of us are with those in mourning. We stand with them. After this deadly act of anti-Semitic hate where Americans were exercising their right to worship freely, we stand for humanity, justice, and unity.

 

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Arlington National Cemetery: Wayside Exhibits, 2009-2010

Partner: National Park Service
Over the course of two semesters, AU Public History students partnered with the National Park Service to develop an interpretive plan for Arlington National Cemetery. Combining archival research with lessons in graphic design, students created a series of wayside exhibits to educate visitors about the important, though often unmarked, sites and memorials scattered across the cemetery's 624 acres. 

Arlington House: Interpretive Furnishing Plan, Spring 2010

Partner: National Park Service
Incorporating contemporary research on historical interpretation, exhibit design, and African American studies, AU Public History students developed a comprehensive furnishing plan for Arlington House, the Robert E. Lee Memorial's north slave quarters and winter kitchen. The plan broadened the popular site's historical narrative to include free and enslaved people of color, emphasizing themes of enslaved resistance, contested living spaces, and local, regional, and international mobility.

Students present their poster to another person

The Bill of Rights and National Parks, Spring 2017

Partner: National Park Service
The student team of Ashlee Anderson, Lisa Beaudoin, Madison Carper, and Alison Russell created a website connecting various National Park sites to the amendments of the Bill of Rights. By drawing connections between each amendment and specific sites, the team worked to help navigation and to allow for the public to better understand the parks.

Students in NMAH group stand with their poster

Treasures of the Smithsonian, Spring 2017

Partner: National Museum of American History
The student team of Jenna Hill, Sydney Weaver, and Katrina Wioncek developed a set of 17 large flashcards for use at the National Museum of American History, which highlight 10 famous artifacts and link them to less familiar artifacts in the museum. Volunteers will use these flashcards to engage museum visitors in historical thinking and to orient them in the museum to encourage exploration.

ACEJMC Accredited Undergrad Programs: Additional Data

The charts below include additional information about journalism and public communication, the undergraduate SOC programs accredited by ACEJMC (Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication). The AU School of Communication is required by ACEJMC to make this specific information available to the public.

The two charts below only track students who declared as a journalism or public communication major at the point they originally enrolled in classes at AU, displaying the number of those original students who then continued and/or graduated as the same major they declared when originally enrolled. Students who changed their major are not counted in the retention or graduation numbers after they switched. Students who switched to journalism and public communication after first enrolling in classes are not included below.

The numbers represented in the charts below are small because a large number of AU students change or declare their major after first enrolling in classes. Additionally, many students start as an undecided major or undecided within the School of Communication. We encourage and assist students as they explore interests, abilities, and values. We guide students as they learn healthy goal setting and decision making techniques, which often lead to declaring or changing the academic major to better align their interests, abilities, values, and goals.

NPR Practicum Group members standing with their poster

Unreeling NPR History, Spring 2018

Partner: National Public Radio (NPR)
In partnership with AU Public History alumna and NPR Archivist Julie Rogers, the student team of Blake Harris, Lina Mann, Micaela Procipio, and Josh Zampetti worked to preserve and increase public access to NPR's audio shows. The group focused on the early years of All Things Considered, from 1971 to 1983, and on making the audio available to students conducting research for National History Day. 

Center Scholars are selected as they embark on their thesis projects during the second year of their graduate program, when they have accumulated at least 18 credit hours. Part-time students are also eligible. 

Scholars must meet the following requirements:

  1. Be in good standing, have a record of excellence in film, video, or new media production, and a minimum GPA of 3.5.
  2. Exhibit outstanding intellect, leadership, and ambition.
  3. Show they are determined to make films that matter, that make a difference, and that make the world a better place.
  4. Demonstrate perseverance, creativity, passion, diligence, and integrity through their past work.
  5. Have a thesis topic which advances the Center's mission.

Daniel RitterDaniel Ritter is a senior studying Interdisciplinary Studies: Communication, Legal Institutions, Economics, and Government (CLEG) in the School of Public Affairs. He is a member of the SPA Honors Program and AU Scholars. Daniel spends his spare time serving as the president of the Club Running team and reading about transportation policy and urbanism. In his role as project coordinator, Daniel creates content for and manages the Project's online presence, organizes events, and trains peer facilitators.

Bob Rosen: Grounded

October 10 at Hughes Formal Lounge. Add link to event details or RSVP page.

Caitlyn Loucas

Clinician

Film Screenings

Title One: Lorem Ipsum
October 10

Title Two: Lorem Ipsum
October 17

Enemy Campaigns and The Politics of Confrontation with Counterrevolutionary Groups

Transcript of a presentation by Eduardo Fontes Suárez, Political Section of the Ministry of the Interior, Cuba (June 2010)

A Cuban counterintelligence specialist details Cuba's changing relationship with technologies and increasing access to technology to civilians. It also considers the American government's role in bringing the Internet to Cuba to potentially accelerate the transition to democracy. Finally, he discusses Alan Gross's role in bringing subversive technologies to Cuba, the dangers that these might pose to youth and other citizens, and what the Cuban government is doing to combat those efforts.

Link to full text and full video via Translating Cuba

Kerry, Leahy, Menendez Questions and Answers on the Effectiveness of Democracy Programs Worldwide

(February 2012)

Senators Kerry, Leahy, and Menendez answer eight questions regarding the USAID Cuba Program in Cuba, stressing metrics, strengths and weaknesses, impact, numbers of people assisted, the extent of the program, effectiveness, legal risks, and requirements.

Download the full text

Still have questions? Send us an email: healthfitness@american.edu

Congratulations to the 2017 graduates of American University!

Why Are Women Still Not Running for Office?

Extensive research shows that when women run for office, they perform just as well as men. Yet women remain severely under-represented in our political institutions. In this report, we argue that the fundamental reason for women's under-representation is that they do not run for office. There is a substantial gender gap in political ambition; men tend to have it, and women don't.
Read the report here.

Gloria Stienem at AU

Tuesday, October 5, 2010

The Women & Politics Institute co-sponsored an event at which Gloria Steinem discussed feminism today, the struggles the women’s movement continues to face, and what the next generation of women’s activism will entail. After her speech, students were invited to participate in a question and answer session with Ms. Steinem. Other co-sponsors included: the Kennedy Political Union, Women's Initiative, and AU College Democrats.

  1.  Create your account

Members


Registration

Registration for this course is limited, and is first come, first served. The course may fill before the registration deadline. To reserve your spot, please complete the registration process (steps 1-5 below):

  1. Complete the online registration form.
  2. Print and complete the program consent form.
  3. Print and complete the program payment form.
  4. Photocopy the photo/biographical information page of your passport.
  5. Deliver items 2, 3, and 4 (along with a $300 non-refundable deposit) to the Kogod Office of Global Learning mailbox in KSB Room #106.

The deadline to register for this program is Friday, October 27.

Overview

Kogod's IBUS 244: International Management Practices course provides students the opportunity to experience the management practices and business environments in Cuban organizations.

The travel component of the program consists of a series of meetings with managers and tours of companies across various industry sectors, engaged in interactive follow-up discussions to analyze the state of economic development in Cuba.

The course enables you to fuse classroom learning with actual techniques used to compete in the global marketplace. The professor for this course is Heather Elms, Associate Professor of International Business.

Travel Timeline

The Program will begin on March 10, at the meeting point of the group flight departure (either Miami or another city). Kogod will organize the group flight to and from Cuba, and all program participants will be required to take this flight. The program will conclude on March 19.

Itinerary and Housing

The group will depart for Havana, Cuba on Saturday, March 10.

While in Havana, students and staff will be staying in a Residencia. Breakfast and dinner will be provided. Previous Cuba company visits have included a tour of a local cigar factory, a visit to an agricultural cooperative/agribusiness micro-industry project, a meeting with officials from the Center to Promote External Trade and Foreign Investments from the Ministry of External Trade and Foreign Investment (MINCEX), and a visit a Veradero resort. While in Havana, the group will also have guest lectures from local experts and experience cultural events such as a Tropicana cabaret show or a local jazz concert.

Students will return to Washington, D.C. on Sunday, March 18.

REMINDER: All visits and activities are tentative and subject to change.

Credit Hours and Eligibility

This program is a 2-credit fall course (IBUS-244-001) and standard AU tuition applies. A 3-credit section of the course is also available (IBUS-244-002).

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Travel Timeline

The Program will begin on March 10, at the meeting point of the group flight departure (either Miami or another city). Kogod will organize the group flight to and from Cuba, and all program participants will be required to take this flight. The program will conclude on March 19.

Itinerary and Housing

The group will depart for Havana, Cuba on Saturday, March 10.

While in Havana, students and staff will be staying in a Residencia. Breakfast and dinner will be provided. Previous Cuba company visits have included a tour of a local cigar factory, a visit to an agricultural cooperative/agribusiness micro-industry project, a meeting with officials from the Center to Promote External Trade and Foreign Investments from the Ministry of External Trade and Foreign Investment (MINCEX), and a visit a Veradero resort. While in Havana, the group will also have guest lectures from local experts and experience cultural events such as a Tropicana cabaret show or a local jazz concert.

Students will return to Washington, D.C. on Sunday, March 18.

REMINDER: All visits and activities are tentative and subject to change.

Credit Hours and Eligibility

This program is a 2-credit fall course (IBUS-244-001) and standard AU tuition applies. A 3-credit section of the course is also available (IBUS-244-002).

Questions?

Contact the Office of Global Learning at 202-885-1940 or email us at ksbabroad@american.edu.

CTRL has prepared resources for Faculty for creating culturally sustaining classrooms and spaces.


Diversity on campus

AU aligns with the work of the Association of American Colleges & Universities in defining diversity and inclusion.

Our Mission

To inspire a new generation of filmmakers and media experts whose commitment to environmental stewardship drives them to produce creative work that is informative, ethically sound, entertaining-and makes a positive difference.

Our signature initiatives include:

  1. Creating partnerships with established organizations-Maryland Public Television, the National Park Service, The Humane Society of the United States, and others-that give students the opportunity to produce professional films.
  2. Bringing world-class filmmakers to American University to speak, teach, and mentor.
  3. Developing innovative, interdisciplinary, and experiential classes and programs.
  4. Promoting the ethical treatment of wildlife and the environment.
  5. Awarding student scholarships and fellowships.
  6. Supporting and mentoring environmental and wildlife filmmakers in a variety of other ways.
Read the Annual Report

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Step 1: Be approved through one of our partner organizations or institutions to study abroad for a semester or year

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.



Directions to Campus

Hourly parking is available in the garage under the Katzen Art Center. Campus can be reached by DC Metro rail and bus, or by using the AU Shuttle Bus.




Members

Time for a movie night? The Music Library has many great film musicals on DVD. Browse our collection online and then stop in to borrow a film!


News

Diversity is defined as individual differences (e.g., personality, learning styles, and life experiences) and group/social differences (e.g., race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, country of origin, and ability as well as cultural, political, religious, or other affiliations).


Health Studies Research

Public Intellectuals Making a Difference

In our department, students train to be public intellectuals. Alumni are very successful and can be found in university, private-sector, and government positions around the globe. Our graduates have gone on to teach at respected schools in the US, including Northwestern University, George Mason University, and the University of Iowa. They also teach internationally at schools such as the University of the West Indies in Trinidad and Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

Other graduates work for government agencies like USAID and the National Park Service or for nonprofits like ACDI/VOCA, the Arkansas Archeological Survey, the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals, and Historic Mount Vernon. Wherever they go, AU doctors of anthropology are known for their first-rate educations, political savvy, understanding of policy issues, and commitment to social justice.


Area Lodging

American University has negotiated discounted rates with hotels conveniently located to campus. Discounted rates are provided for quests of AU, faculty, staff, and current students for business or personal travel. We encourage you to make reservations as early as possible.

Here are some hotels within a five-mile radius of campus:

Literature

David Keplinger published his fifth collection of poetry, Another City (Milkweed Editions, 2018). Poems from the volume have won the Cavafy Prize from Poetry International and the Erskine Poetry Prize from Smartish Pace, with other work having appeared in American Poetry Review, Poetry, Ploughshares, and AGNI.

Student Lab

Dedicated to Kogod student use, the computer lab is conveniently located on the Terrace level of the business School's expansion, mere steps from classrooms and breakout rooms. Twelve computers are available during building hours, along with printing and copying capabilities.

Bloomberg terminal access is also available in the student lab. Additionally, all computers in the lab are equipped with the same software offered in the FSIT Lab.

The student lab is located in room T54 on the Terrace level of the Kogod School of Business.

Check out our faculty research.

Funding opportunities are available.

 

Our department is proud to present this new program.


Student Center Policies

Teen sleeping at classroom desk

Sleep and Emotional Processes in Adolescence

his study is designed to assess how sleep disrupts everyday emotion processes in adolescence. Although we know that stress interferes with emotion regulation, there is surprisingly little literature on how this happens. Teenagers completed two daily diary surveys each day for two weeks while wearing an unobtrusive activity device to monitor their sleep. One goal of the study is to test how emotion regulation differs following nights of poor sleep. This might include disruption in the amount of stress, reactions to stress, attention, impulse control, ruminative thoughts in response to stress, increased social problems, or less ability to capitalize on positive events. Further, the study aims to test whether these sleep-emotion processes are different for students experiencing depression symptoms.

Members

Explore the Possibilities

While many of our students go on to complete PhDs and pursue academic careers, the writing and research skills developed in this program can be applied to many positions. A solid background in history is an asset for education professionals at every level, from teaching to developing education programs for museums and cultural institutions. Our alumni hold positions with important institutions like History Associates, the National Park Service, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and the Smithsonian Institution.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Still have questions? Send us an email: econ@american.edu

Our MA in Economics is an applied, policy-oriented 30-36 credit program designed to ensure that our graduates make an impact by developing these three critical skills:

  • Use economic theory to explain outcomes and make informed predictions
  • Analyze data to rigorously answer questions, such as how specific policies will affect markets
  • Convey economic concepts and findings to a wide audience.

Coursework will prepare you to interpret economic models, test hypotheses, and analyze human and organizational behavior to make a positive impact on society.

Students can choose from five distinct tracks withing the program: general economics, development economics, gender analysis in economics, financial economic policy, and applied economics (online only).

Complete Degree and Course Requirements

Entrance Semesters
Fall, spring, summer.
Application Deadlines
Fall priority admissions, March 1; applications on a rolling basis until August 1.
Spring priority admissions, November 1; applications on a rolling basis until December 1.
Summer admission: May 1
Additional Requirements
Statement of Purpose
Transcripts
2 Letters of Recommendation
Resume
Praxis Core scores (Passing scores by DC standards on Praxis Core exam: Reading 156, Writing 162, Math 150).
Application
Online Application

AU's Master of Arts in Teaching takes only five semesters to complete. The curriculum has been designed by education experts who understand that, while grounding in a theoretical framework is an important part of training teachers, it's hands-on experience in a real-life classroom setting that allows great future teachers to solidify their practical skills. For that reason, practical experience is an integral part of our program, whether you join us on campus or online.

Students choose one of two tracks: elementary (grades 1-6) or secondary (grades 7-12) education. All students start with foundational courses such as Theories of Educational Psychology and Human Development, and then go on to earn at least 39 credit hours in their chosen track.

See Admissions & Requirements.

Still have questions? Send us an email: teachered@american.edu

Education professor Dennis conferring with student after class.

In the Teacher Education Program you will:

  • Work with outstanding faculty known in the academic community for generating ground-breaking ideas for the improvement of education and instruction.
  • Take innovative, progressive classes in a small, individual-focused setting while be surrounded by students who share your interests in education and build a network of resources for your future.
  • Build a network of resources for your future in diverse field experiences in DC Public Schools and throughout the DC Metro Area.

Invocation for the College of Arts and Sciences

by Rev. Mark Schaefer, University Chaplain

O Great Mystery,
'For everything there is a season
and a time for every purpose under the heavens.'

We thank you O Lord, Our God, ruler of the universe,
who has granted us life, who has sustained us,
and who has helped us to reach this season.

The present season is one in which we pause to reflect
On all that has been, on all that we have seen together:
We have witnessed great change on campus and in our world,
We have gone through times of anxiety,
We have grieved the loss of dear friends and classmates,

We have witnessed assaults on the values we hold most dear,
And we have seen our community
rally to defend those values,
We have seen our brothers and sisters
reach out in solidarity and love,
We have seen our community draw together
in its grief and mutual support,
And we have seen the power of
that commitment to justice,
that commitment to hope,
that commitment to love.
We have seen the best that is our community
Lived out in the lives of those who now stand before us
Robed in blue.

For a season, these graduates were ours
And for that season we give thanks:
for the time they have been able to share with us.
for all those who brought them to us
thanks for the parents, family, and friends,
who nurtured, prepared, and encouraged them;
We give thanks for this University,
for the faculty and staff who taught our graduates
and guided them on their way;
forming and shaping them
for a life of service and responsibility.
Continue, O Holy Spirit, to bless this University community,
its faculty and staff,
that they may continue in its work
of shaping the leaders of your people.
But before these graduates were ours,
they were yours,
and yours they remain.
Grant that in all the seasons of their lives,
in times of joy or tears,
in times of confidence or self-doubt,
of celebration or lament,
of welcome or alienation,
of success or failure,
of knowing or unknowing,
of hope or fear,
They may know that you are with them;
That they are not alone,
That they are bound up together with you
and with one another.

And now, O God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful,
we pray that in all the seasons of their lives they may continue to be
beacons of hope and promise
to a broken world
a world in need
a world waiting for them,
And let us say: Amen.

 

Invocation for the Kogod School of Business

by Imad-ad-Dean Ahmad, Muslim Chaplain

Bism Allah irRahman ir Rahim,

In the name of God, the Beneficent, the Merciful,
O Creator of All Things, Evolver of all things,
Necessary Existent, known by many names,
Who has spoken to all people in all times,
Through an abundance of prophets
Monopolized by no one race or land,
We gratefully acknowledge your presence with us here today.

This day we celebrate the accomplishments
Of the students of the Kogod School of Business who receive their degrees
And now leave the comfortable nest of their alma mater
To move on to new chapters in their lives.
We invoke Your blessings upon them.

We pray that You will strengthen these graduates,
Purify their intentions and enable them
To use the knowledge and skills they have acquired here
To bring prosperity to themselves, their communities, this nation, and the world.

For all these graduates, let what they have learned here
Be a resource on which they draw, wherever they may choose to employ their skills,
Whether in finance or trade, in a major corporation or a startup,
That in these difficult times when the middle class is struggling,
When business is conflated with materialism, marketing with deception,
Lending with usury, and economy with "cutting corners,"
Inspire them to remember that our forefather Abraham was a thriving businessman,
And the Prophet Muhammad's wife Khadijah was a successful businesswoman,
That business can be conducted with spirituality,
That commerce should be a win-win game,
That the entrepreneur's job is to deploy capital in such a way
That the collective wealth increases and that all boats shall be lifted;
Draw them into the ranks of the honest businesspeople that the Prophet Muhammad said
Shall be in the ranks of the martyrs and the prophets on the Day of Judgment.
Save them from the sins of unfair advantage and fraud
And enroll then in the ranks of those who produce wealth
And who spend their profits in doing good works.

Let them hear and understand your words in the Qur'an:
"Eat not up your property among yourselves in vanities: But let there be amongst you Traffic and trade by mutual good-will: Nor kill (or destroy) yourselves: For truly God has been to you Most Merciful!"

Lord, You are the Beneficent and from you comes Abundance.
Give us the good thing in this life and the next.

Amen

Invocation for the School of International Service

by Rev. Joey Heath-Mason, United Methodist Chaplain

Empowering One of grace and mercy, we invite your presence into this place today as family, faculty, administrators, community and friends, have come together to celebrate the accomplishments of the graduating class of 2018 and to hear the petitions of our hearts.

Today we give thanks -

For the sweet taste of accomplishment. In a world that persistently asks, "What have you done lately?", we are here to celebrate hard work completed and done well. Allow this to be a time of great joy and celebration.

For sacrifices made by others. Most of us have not made it here alone. Remind us that these significant ones, many of them present today, will walk this stage in spirit with these graduates.

For the sacrifices made by the graduates themselves. They have shown dedication through their studies…hours in the library and the many terrace spaces on campus, in study groups and group projects, and the all-nighters, and papers turned in at the last moment but on time. Through the sweat and tears and shouts of joy we give thanks for completing what may be the most difficult work they have done to this point in life.

And we ask today for your blessing on these our graduates -

Bless them with passion. Let them move out from this day, not into jobs, but into a calling. Let them live for their passions, their talents, and their gifts, and take every opportunity to put these to good use in creating a better tomorrow.

Bless them with a sense of responsibility. Remind them that they have a contribution to make, to create change and create a better world in whatever places they find themselves. That as graduates they are now a people of privilege charged to use that privilege responsibly and not to the detriment of others.

Bless them with humility. Help them to live not in excessive pride, but in a way that lifts the values of equity and equality of all humanity, that seeks to not lift up oneself alone, but seeks to lift all others as well.

And finally bless them with a legacy. These graduates today will mark the world whether they are trying to or not. Let the shadow of their mark stretch far beyond their liabilities and limitations. Let them know the rich satisfaction, not of merely making a living, but of living a life - full, rich and deep.

For all these things we pray, amen.

Invocation for the School of Public Affairs

by Jason Benkendorf, Jewish Chaplain & Hillel Director

Almighty God, Creator of the universe,

We pause this morning to acknowledge the blessings that have made this special day possible.

We are grateful for the opportunity that these graduates have had to study here at American University. For the classes that have challenged them, the internships that have taught them valuable skills, the late night conversations that have expanded their worldviews.

We are grateful for the community that these graduates found here. God, you teach us that it is not good for human beings to be alone. And, indeed, these graduates have not been alone in this journey. They have shared these years with friends, classmates, devoted faculty and staff, and their experiences have been enriched as a result.

We are grateful that these graduates can celebrate today surrounded by loving family and friends. We recognize the sacrifices that so many of these families have made for their graduates, and we honor them for their selflessness.

God, we thank you for these blessings and so many more.

We know that the journey toward this day has not always been easy. We know, too, that the road ahead will not always be smooth. God, we beseech you: shower your blessings on these talented graduates. Help them to apply the lessons that they have learned here in health and happiness, with humility and generosity, and always in keeping with their highest ideals.

God, go with these graduates, and shine your countenance upon them always.

Praised are you, God, who has sustained us and kept us and allowed us to reach this auspicious day. And let us say, amen.

Invocation for the School of Communication

by Rev. Fr. Carlos Quijano, Catholic Chaplain

[Text coming soon]

Invocation for the Washington College of Law

by Rev. Mark Schaefer, University Chaplain

Blessed are you O Lord, Our God, ruler of the universe,
     who has granted us life, who has sustained us,
          and who has helped us to reach this season,
     "who executes justice for the oppressed;
          who gives food to the hungry."

In your grace, you have given us the Law
     and instilled in our hearts a desire for justice
          tempered by mercy.
     In pursuit of the knowledge of law
          these graduates have long labored
               (and perhaps long suffered)
          and come now
          to the end of their studies.

We gather this day to celebrate and give thanks:
     Thanks for this day and the gift of life;
     Thanks for the friends and family who have come
          from near and far
     Thanks for this University,
          for the faculty and staff
          for their instruction
               their mentoring and guidance
               their example and testimony;
And most of all, we give thanks for these graduates:
     for the gifts with which you have blessed them;
     for the blessing they will be to a world in need.

Help them-
     Indeed help all of us who have taken on the calling of the Law
     To remember the purposes
          for which the Law has been put forth,
          the task to which we have been summoned

On this Festival of Shavuot,
Let us hear the words spoken to us in your Torah:
     "Justice, justice shall you pursue."
and hear the words proclaimed by your prophets:
     to "seek justice, rescue the oppressed,
     defend the orphan, plead for the widow."

On this Pentecost Sunday,
Let us hear the words of One who reminded us
     not to neglect "the weightier matters of the law: justice and mercy and faith."

On this Fifth Day of Ramadan
Let us hear the words brought by your Messenger:
     "Stand out firmly for justice, as witnesses to God, even as against yourselves."

And so, Author of all Righteousness,
Grant
     that in a world of injustice
          our graduates might be agents of justice;
     that in a world of division,
          they might be agents of reconciliation;
     that in a world of conflict,
          they might be agents of peace;
     that in a world of unfairness,
          they might be agents of equity;
     that in a world where the voices of so many are drowned out
          they might with their advocacy amplify those voices;
     that in a world in which so many are pushed to the margins,
          they might through their work draw all to the center.
     that in a world of rising authoritarianism,
     and in a world of rising chaos and disruption
          they might be agents of that 'ordered liberty'
          that binds your people into a free and just society.
     that they may work for a world in which
     "justice may roll down like waters
     and righteousness like an everflowing stream."

And now, O God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful,
Send them forth in love and wisdom,
     with the boldness of vision
          and the fearlessness of hope,
          so that in all things they may testify to that hope
     in a world in need of their witness,
          now more than ever.

And let us say: Amen.

Executive Director Donald Williamson can comment on the following subjects:

  • Accounting methods and periods
  • Business formation
  • Business and family wealth succession
  • IRS procedures and practices
  • Real estate transactions
  • Research and development tax planning
  • Employee fringe benefits
  • Executive compensation
  • Individual and Business taxation

Available Training Sessions

Whether you just want to get started or fine tune your skills, the FSIT Lab will help you with a variety of training opportunities such as:

ScriptDC

scriptdc 2018: Words to action!friday, october 26 - sunday, october 28
Mckinley building 

Get your tickets here.

ScriptDC is back! ScriptDC is the premier conference for Mid-Atlantic filmmakers including writers, directors, producers and talent to connect with accomplished teachers, consultants and industry professionals. ScriptDC supports the work of directors, producers, actors, and writers via seminars that provide access to talented media professionals willing to share their expertise. This year's speakers will give you insights into how a script moves through production to distribution, what it's like to be in the writer's room for a one-hour drama or a half-hour comedy, the feminine heroic journey, creating virtual reality media, and the business of documentary (and more)! We are delighted to be working with Roadmap Writers to give 32 attendees the opportunity to pitch their projects via Skype to LA-based development executives. Only thing missing this weekend is the cost of a plane ticket!

In Residence Faculty

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

VOLUME: 36.5 linear feet

ACCESS: This collection is open to the public upon request.

COPYRIGHT: Please consult the archivist for information about duplication or publishing of any materials from this collection.

RELATED COLLECTIONS: Ellen S. Overton Papers

Biographical Note

Irene Tinker was born in 1927 and received her B.A. from Radcliff College in political philosophy and comparative government and her PhD. from the London School of Economics and Political Science in comparative government and development. She married Millidge Walker in 1952, with whom she had three children. Irene Tinker became a leading academic and activist in field of women in international development specifically the gender impact of development. She served on the faculties of the University of Maryland, Howard University, American University, and University of California-Berkeley, where she spent the majority of her teaching years. She taught courses covering women studies, city and regional planning and development, among other topics. She was a Fulbright Scholar in Nepal and Sri Lanka (1987-1989) and a fellow at the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Center in Italy (March-April 1994).  

Scope and Content Note

This collection consists of biographical materials; correspondence; conference materials; government, NGO, and organizational reports and newsletters, including many from the World Bank and the United Nations; interview notes and transcripts; manuscripts; newspaper, magazine and journal articles; research notes; teaching materials; and working papers. The collection includes chapter notes, drafts and correspondence from the book she edited and published in 2004, Developing Power: How Women Transformed International Development.

The bulk of this collection is comprised of materials relating to international development and especially the role of women and non-governmental organizations. Much of which relates to the informal economy and her work on Street Foods, a 15 year research project investigating ways to improve vendor income and food safety. Other major topics include Indonesia and the passage and implementation of the 1973 Percy Amendment, which required U.S. bilateral aid programs to explicitly address the role of women in developing countries’ economies.

The collection also includes a few three-dimensional objects, including pins, buttons, t-shirts and tote bags from conferences and events Tinker attended.

Provenance

Irene Tinker donated her papers to American University Library in four installments (2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010).

Processing Note

As this collection came in multiple installments, the archivist had to identify and combine related documents. The materials for Irene Tinker’s book, Developing Power: How Women Transformed International Development, were arranged alphabetically by the name of the author of each chapter and include drafts, comments and correspondence.

In organizing the subject files within this collection, the archivist used the categories assigned by Irene Tinker whenever possible. Additional categories were created as needed. The archivist placed material in the category “Gender” when it related to the relationship between men and women in development, or the material focused on men. The term “Women” was used when materials related specifically to the role of women. In the cases where there was not enough “gender” material to warrant its own folder, these materials were categorized with “women” and vice versa.


Box and Folder Listing

Box 1
Biographical Materials
Certificate, 1957
Curriculum Vitae, n.d.
Correspondence [2 folders], 1960-2007
Expense/Travel Reports, 2003-2004
Clippings
 1957-1963, n.d.
 AFL-CIO, 1962, n.d.
 Civil Rights Movement, 1963-1964, n.d.
 Tjibantjet, 1957-1958
Magazines
 Radditudes, 1946-1947
 Signature, 1947-1949
Millidge Walker, 1970-1983, n.d.
 Shanghai American School [3 folders], 1940-1999, n.d.
 Newsletters [2 folders], 1989-1999
Notes, 1960-1961, n.d.  
Photographs, 1961, n.d.
Travel Permits, 1961, n.d.
Teaching Materials
University of Maryland- Women and World Development, Summer 1981
American University
 Comparative Urbanization Project, 1972-1990, n.d.
 International Development Courses, 1986-1989
Berkeley
 CP115: Urbanization in Developing Countries, Spring 1995
 CP117: Gender & Planning, Fall 1995
 CP270
 Regional and Urban Development in Third World Countries
 Fall 1989
 Fall 1990
 Regional and Urban Development Strategies, 1992
 Global Trends and Local Actions, Spring 1993
 Regional and Urban Development Strategies
 Fall 1994
 1996
 Regional and Urban Development Strategies in Low Income Countries
 Spring 1998
 CRP284B
 Topics in City and Metropolitan Planning- Informal Sector, Spring 1990
 Economic Development and the Informal Economy, Spring 1991
 Semester at Sea, Spring 1997
 WS14: Contemporary Global Issues for Women
 Spring 1991
 1992-1994
 Spring 1995
 Spring 1996
 WS24: Woman Organizing, Fall 1992
 WS141/241: Women and World Development
 1990-1992
 Fall 1995
 Fall 1996
 Fall 1997

Box 2
Developing Power: How Women Transformed International Development
 Intro
 Antrobus
 Bruce
 Chaney
 Cloud
 Colombo
 Derryck
 Flora
 Fraser
 Gachukia
 Gulhati
 Haslegrave
 Hoskins
 Hussein
 Jain
 Jaquette
 Knowles
 Lewis
 Lycklama
 Pitanguy
 Portugal
 Rowan-Campbell
 Scott
 Shahani
 Smith
 Snyder
 Staudt
 Timothy
 Walker
 Walsh
Subject Files
Archival Project, 1992-2003, n.d.
Abortion, 1991-1996, n.d.
Affirmative Action, 1989=1998, n.d.
Aging, 1990-1995
Agriculture [2 folders], 1973-1993

Box 3
Subject Files (continued)
Agriculture [2 folders], 1994-2009
Women, 1984-1995
Child Welfare, 1991-2000, n.d.
Development [5 folders], 1978-2003, n.d.
 Democratization, 1986-1997, n.d.
 Asia, 1990-1991

Box 4
Subject Files (continued)
Development (continued)
 Democratization (continued)
 Asia (continued) [2 folders], 1992-1994, n.d.
 Latin America, 1991-2000
 Economics, 1956, 1992-1996
 Foreign Aid, 1979-2008
Gender [3 folders], 1989-2009, n.d.
 Asia, 1990-2009
 Grassroots Development [2 folders], 1988-1996, n.d.
 Grassroots Development [3 folders], 1977-1998
 Millennium Development Goals, 2002-2004

Box 5
Subject Files (continued)

Development (continued)
 Regional
 Africa, 1989-1992, n.d.
 Asia, 1988-1995, n.d.
 Indonesia [6 folders], 1968-1996, n.d.
 Rural Development [2 folders], 1976-1997, n.d.
 Women, 1982-1996
 Sustainable Development [3 folders], 1984-2006, n.d.
 Resource Management, 1996-1998

Box 6
Subject Files (continued)
Development (continued)
 Women [4 folders], 1975-2008, n.d.
 Association for Women’s Rights in Development, 1995-2004
 Coalition for Women in International Development, 1978-1979
 International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) - Promoting Women in Development (PROWID) [2 folders], 1996-1999
 International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW) [2 folders], 1989-1997
 Percy Amendment [2 folders], 1973-1984, n.d.
 Swedish International Development Authority (SIDA), 1977-1985
 Theory, 1982-1998, n.d.
 USAID, 1977-1996, n.d.
 World Bank, 1975-1989

Box 7
Subject Files (continued)
Economics [2 folders], 1970-2001, n.d.
 “Doing Business” {re: comparative regulatory measures}, 2008
 Equal Means: Women Organizing Economic Solutions, 1992-1995
 Gender [2 folders], 1987-2006
 Globalization, 1994-2002
 Homeworking [2 folders], 1982-2008, n.d.
 Home Net, 1998-2001

Box 8
Subject Files (continued)
Economics (continued)
 Informal Economy, 2003-2004
 Informal Sector [2 folders], 1978-2001, n.d.
 Africa, 1984-2000, n.d.
 Asia, 1987-2002, n.d,
 Latin America, 1983-1998
 Street Vendors, 1995
 Women [2 folders], 1981-2002, n.d.
 International Monetary Fund, 1990-2002
 Labor, 1984-2000, n.d
 Gender, 1991-2000, n.d.
 Local Government Financing, 1987, n.d.
 Microfinance [4 folders], 1990-2003, n.d.
 Accion International, 1989-1998, n.d.
 Aspen Institute [2 folders], 1993-2004
 Portland Microenterprise Summit, 1999
 Microfinance, Risk Management and Poverty, 2000-2001, n.d.
 Regional
 Africa, 1984-2007, n.d.
 Africa- 1997 Trip

Box 9
Subject Files (continued)
Economics (continued)
 Microfinance (continued)
 Regional (continued)
 Asia, 1984-2001, n.d.
 Bangladesh, 1978-2002, n.d.
 India, 1993-2001, n.d.
 Vietnam, 1996-1998
 Latin America, 1990-2002, n.d.
 United Nations, 1990-2002
 Women [2 folders], 1980-2003, n.d.
 Self Employed Women’s Association, 1987-2001, n.d.
 Social Capital, 1996-2002
 Socio-Economic Rights in South Africa, 2000
 Structural Adjustment [3 folders], 1979-2006, n.d.
 Trade [2 folders], 1990-2002, n.d.
 Women, 1971-2002
 Africa, 1988-2002, n.d.
 Asia, 1987-1999

Box 10
Subject Files (continued)
Economics (continued)
 Women (continued)
 Asia, 2000-2007, n.d.
 Latin America, 1985-1998, n.d.
 World Bank, 1994-2007, n.d.
 World Bank Papers, 2001-2004
Education, 1987-2000, n.d.
 Women [2 folders], 1971-2005, n.d.
Elites, 1973-1979
Environment [3 folders], 1988-2008, n.d.
 Climate Change, 1983-1995, n.d.
 Energy, 1976-2009, n.d.
 Energia News [2 folders], 1998-2010
 Forestry [2 folders], 1988-1999, n.d.  
 Women, 1984-2001

Box 11
Subject Files (continued)

Environment (continued)
 Regional
 Asia, 1990-1997, n.d.
 Mexico, 1990-1996
 Sustainability [2 folders], 1988-2000
 Water Resources, 1986-2002
 Women [2 folders], 1987-1998, n.d.
Food [4 folders], 1978-2003
 Cook Stove Technology, 1993-1998
 Food Aid, 1990-1998
 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 1995-2003, n.d.
 Food Chain: A Journal about Small-Scale Food Processing, 1992 -2002
 Food Security, 1990-2000, n.d.
 Gender, 1985-1996
 Hunger Notes (Publication of World Hunger Education Services) [2 folders],1979-2000

Box 12
Subject Files (continued)
Food (continued)
 International Food Policy Research Institute, 1992-2009
 20/20 Vision, 1995-2007, n.d.
 Regional
 Africa, 1992-2004, n.d.
 Asia, 1989-1995
 Latin America, 1996-2008, n.d.
 Street Food [2 folders], 1980-2004, n.d.
 Bangladesh, 1984, n.d.
 Indonesia [2 folders], 1983-1992
 Philippines, 1983-1999, n.d.
 Senegal, 1982-1983
 Vietnam, 1998
 Urban Agriculture: Food, Jobs, and Sustainable Cities, 1996
 Urban Food Production [5 folders], 1976-2003, n.d.
 Urban Issues, 1991-2000, n.d.

Box 13
Subject Files (continued)
Housing [3 folders], 1972-2005, n.d.
 Asia [2 folders], 1990-2007, n.d.
 Gender Perspectives, 1992-2001  
 Habitat Debate, 1996-2000
 Habitat International Coalition Women and Shelter Network, 1989-1993
 Self-made Housing, 1980-1996
 Women [3 folders], 1984-2002, n.d.
 World Habitat Day, 1992-1997
Human Rights, 1983-2000
Human Security, 2002-2003
Land [2 folders], 1986-2003, n.d.
 Gender Perspectives, 1996-2008, n.d.
 Women’s Property Rights, 1992-1997

Box 14
Subject Files (continued)
Land (continued)
 Women’s Property Rights (continued) [2 folders], 1998-2007, n.d.
Law, 1990-2006
Men’s Movement, 1991-2008, n.d.
Migration, 1989-2005, n.d.
Non-Alignment n.d.
Non-Governmental Organizations [3 folders], 1987-2007, n.d.
 Aspen Institute Project [3 folders] 1994-1999, n.d.
 Bellagio Conference, 1994, n.d.
 Development [3 folders], 1982-1998, n.d.
 India 1994-2001, n.d.
 Funding, 1992-2001

Box 15
Subject Files (continued)
Non-Governmental Organizations (continued)
 NGO Networker, 1988-1995
 NGO & State Relations [2 folders], 1985-2002
 NGO & UN Relations, 1990-1996
 NGO & World Bank Relations, 1987-1996, n.d.
 Public Participation, 1987-1994, n.d.
 Regional
 Africa, 1982-2002
 Asia, 1989-1996, n.d.
 Indonesia [3 folders], 1982-1997, n.d.
 Nepal, 1987
 Philippines [2 folders], 1986-1996
 Thailand, 1993-1997
 Vietnam [3 folders], 1992-1998, n.d.
 Australia, 1991

Box 16
Subject Files (continued)
Non-Governmental Organizations (continued)
 Regional (continued)
 Central America, 1989-1998
 Europe, 1992-1998, n.d.
 Latin America [2 folders], 1987-1997
 Middle East, 2000
 Women, 1989-2002
Non-Profit Organizations [2 folders], 1992-2002, n.d.
Politics [3 folders], 1970-2005, n.d.
 Civil Society [3 folders], 1987-2001, n.d.
 Civil Society & Democracy, 1988-1994
 Decentralization, 1988-1989, n.d.
 Democratization [4 folders], 1963-2008, n.d.

Box 17
Subject Files (continued)
Politics (continued)
 Elections, 1997-2005, n.d.
 Indonesia, 1948
 Independence, 1963-1971
 Local Governance, 1973-1998, n.d.
 Regional
 Africa, 1955-2006, n.d.
 Asia, 1967-1999
 Latin America, 2005-2008

Box 17 (continued)
Subject Files (continued)
Politics (continued)
 Women [2 folders], 1970-2007, n.d.
 Civil Society, 1993-2007
 Democratization [2 folders], 1990-2004, n.d.
 Institute for Women’s Policy Research, 2000-2002
 Leadership and Representation [2 folders], 1993-2008, n.d.
 Peace-building, 1999-2003, n.d.
 Political Participation [4 folders], 1975-2008, n.d.
 Africa, 1996-2007, n.d.

Box 18
Subject Files (continued)
Politics (continued)
 Women (continued)
 Political Participation (continued)
 Asia [2 folders], 2000-2003, n.d.
 India, 1992-2000, n.d.
 Pakistan, 1999
 Europe, 1992-2003, n.d.
 Latin America, 1995-2003
 Regional
 Africa, 2006-2008, n.d.
 Asia, 2005, n.d.
 Latin America [2 folders], 1996-2010, n.d.
Population [2 folders], 1959- 2007, n.d.
 Birth Control, 1963-1996, n.d.
 Family Planning and Reproductive Health [2 folders], 1984-2004
 Population Briefs, 1998-2003
Poverty [2 folders], 1962-2007, n.d.
 Africa, 1998-2003, n.d.
 Asia, 1978-2001
 United States, 1964-1999, n.d.
 Women, 1977-2008
Prostitution, 1990-2008
Publications
 Connexions, 1993-1994
 Field Forum, 2001-2002

Box 19
Subject Files (continued)
Publications (continued)
 Institute of Current World Affairs (ICWA) Letters, 1995-2007
 Inter-American Foundation, 1995-1996
 The New Internationalist, 1990-1996
 Snapshots, 2001-2003
 World Watch, 1991-1996
Race, 1976-1991, n.d.
Refugees, 1991-2001, n.d.
Regional
 Africa, 1989-1999
 Asia [3 folders], 1954-2005, n.d
 Indonesia [4 folders], 1967-2003, n.d.
 Papua New Guinea, 1990
 Latin America [2 folders], 1991-2000, n.d.
 Middle East, 2000, n.d.
Religion, 1983-2009, n.d.
Science, 1976-1993
Social Capital, 1996-2003, n.d.
Sports, 1990-1995

Box 20
Subject Files (continued)
Transportation, 1982-1991
United Nations [2 folders], 1973-1996, n.d.
 Interviews, 1983, n.d.
 UNRISD News, 1999-2001
 Women, 1972-1999, n.d.
Urbanization, [5 folders], 1969-2006, n.d.
 Africa, 1986-1995
 Environmental Management, 1995, n.d.
 Gender [2 folders] 1991-2001, n.d.
 Mega-Cities, 1989-1992
 Urban Age, 1998-2000
 Urban Agriculture, 2000-2002
 The Urban Governance Initiative Urban Links [2 folders], 2001-2004
 Urban Poor [2 folders], 1969-1993, n.d.

Box 21
Subject Files (continued)
Urbanization (continued)
 Urban Poor (continued) [2 folders], 1993-2000, n.d.
Welfare, 1995-1999, n.d.
Women [3 folders], 1974-2006, n.d.
 AIDS, 2000, n.d.
 Conferences, 1975-1981
 Cairo Conference, 1995-1999
 Nairobi Conference, 1986-1991
 United Nations 4th World Conference on Women (Beijing) [3 folders],1995-2007, n.d.
 Empowerment [3 folders], 1995-2006, n.d.
 Equality, 1989-2002
 Gender Equality [2 folders]1996-2007, n.d.
 50-50 Gender Balance, 2009
 Family, 1971-1989

Box 22
Subject Files (continued)
Women (continued)
 Family (continued) [3 folders], 1989-2003, n.d.
 Economics [3 folders], 1987-2007
 Female Headed Households [2 folders], 1978-1997, n.d.
 Feminism [3 folders], 1977-2004, n.d.
 Health, 1977-1998, n.d.
 History , 1998-2001, n.d.
 Human Rights [3 folders]1989-2007, n.d.
 International Women’s Year, 1973-1976
 Mainstreaming [2 folders], 1993-2005 n.d.
 Marriage, 1979-1989, n.d.

Box 23
Subject Files (continued)
Women (continued)
 Notes, 1974-1975, n.d.
 Organizations, 1960-1979 n.d.
 International Women’s Rights Action Watch, 1986-2000
 Maryland Commission for Women, 1976-1978
 Women’s Environment & Development Organization, 1995
 Regional
 Africa, 1987-2002 n.d.
 East Africa, 1975-1999, n.d.
 North Africa, 1981-2002, n.d.
 South Africa, 1993-2005, n.d.
 West Africa/Sahel, 1988-1996, n.d.
 Asia, 1982-2006, n.d.
 Bangladesh, 1989-1996, n.d.
 China, 1987-1997, n.d.
 India [2 folders], 1979-2002, n.d.
 Indonesia [2 folders], 1973-1999, n.d.
 Nepal, 1981-2002, n.d.
 Pakistan, 1998-1999, n.d.
 Singapore, 1990-1993, n.d.
 Sri Lanka, 1988-1994
 Turkey, 1989-2007
 Vietnam, 1994-2000, n.d.
 Europe
 Eastern Europe, 1990-1999, n.d.
 Russia, 1992-1995, n.d.
 Western Europe, 1988-1996, n.d.
 Latin America [2 folders], 1985-1997

Box 24
Subject Files (continued)
Women (continued)
 Regional (continued)
 Latin America (continued), 1999, n.d.
 Middle East, 1997-2007
 United States, 1984-2002, n.d.
 Reproductive Health [2 folders], 1975-2001, n.d.
 Technology, 1982-1997
 Violence, 1979-2001, n.d.
 Female Genital Mutilation, 1992-2001, n.d.
 Voices of Women: Thinking Globally, Acting Locally (VHS)
 Work [3 folders], 1977-2005, n.d.
 Asia, 1985-1999, n.d.
 “The World’s Women: Trends and Statistics” 1970-1995
 Women’s Studies, 1987-1996, n.d.
 World Bank 1988-1995, n.d.
 Participatory Development Workshop [3 folders] 1987-1995
 World Bank Policy Research Bulletin, 1994
 Youth, 2006

Box 25
Hillary Clinton Campaign disk
International Women’s Year t-shirt
Political buttons
Scarf
Tote Bags (2)
Women in Development pins
Women in Development t-shirt

History

Michael Brenner published the book In Search of Israel: The History of an Idea (Princeton University Press, 2018). The book received a great review from Michael Curtis which was published in The Commentator and American Thinker.

Matthew Holbreich

2011-2012 Inaugural Fellow - Matthew Holbrich

Matthew Holbreich earned his PhD in 2011 from the Department of Political Science at Notre Dame University. His dissertation, “Tocqueville and the French Tradition of Political Liberty,” provides a novel reading of liberty and sovereignty in Rousseau, Constant, Guizot, and Tocqueville. Holbreich has a masters degree from the École des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris, 2006) and a B.A. from Tufts University (2005). As an undergraduate, he spent a semester each at Karls-Eberhart Universität (Tübingen, Germany, Spring, 2004) and at the Université de Paris, Sorbonne I and IV (Fall, 2003). Holbreich has been awarded a Lilly Presidential Scholarship from Notre Dame (2006-11), an Institute for Humane Studies Scholarship (2010-11), and a Tufts University Class of 1942 Prize (2005), granted to the three students most likely to become outstanding university professors. He has also won two national essay contests: the Pi Sigma Alpha Political Science Honors Society Penniman Scholarship (2004), awarded to four students nationwide, and the ISI Weaver Fellowship for best essay on education and a free society (2011). Since 2005 he has presented papers at twelve professional conferences, and in 2010-11 he worked as an editorial intern for the Review of Politics. In addition to revising his dissertation, Matthew is currently completing a two article series on the political and religious thought of Abraham Lincoln. In Fall 2011, he is teaching “American Political Thought,” and in Spring 2012 he will lead a seminar (GOVT 496/696) entitled “Freedom.”

Book appointments in advance. Walk-ins welcomed.

Log onto kp.org/wellnessevent and use the code AMUNIV to sign up! Check out the complete Step by Step Registration Guide for more assistance. 

AU Memo Letterhead

Memorandum November 21, 2014

To:
American University Community
From:
Jeffrey A. Sine, Chair, Board of Trustees
Subject:
Fall 2014 Board of Trustees Meeting -- Sustainability & Fossil Free Discussion and Decision

The American University Board of Trustees met on campus for its fall meeting November 20-21. Committee meetings were held on Thursday and the full board met on Friday.

Among the issues the full board discussed was that of socially responsible investment and in particular, "fossil free" divestment, based on the report from the Finance and Investment Committee.

I commend everyone-students, faculty, staff, alumni and trustees-who has been part of the important discussion we have had for more than a year. From the creation of the Advisory Committee on Socially Responsible Investing (ACSRI) and the fine work that group did; the guidance by the Office of General Counsel on fiduciary obligations that govern endowment investing; the research by our Cambridge Associates investment advisors; the considered deliberations of trustees; and the passionate dialogue, petitions, and letters from our dedicated students-all perspectives were important parts of this campus review.

Let me strongly affirm that we all agree on the same goal-that American University must deal effectively, prudently, and promptly to address the serious issue of climate change. There is no greater challenge facing our current and future generations, and the creative ideas from our AU community have provided pro-active suggestions for moving forward.

Our strategic plan, American University and the Next Decade: Leadership for a Changing World, has been an important guidepost in the board's deliberations and conclusions. The plan identified as a transformational goal-to "act on our values through social responsibility and service" by strengthening AU's culture of service and social responsibility- including "an active pursuit of sustainability."

As the board considered new areas for additional action related to climate change, the university's mission, values, and strategic plan were paramount to our final disposition and conclusions.

Progress Toward Carbon Neutrality and Elimination of Greenhouse Emissions

The board supports all that AU is doing to reduce its carbon footprint, curtail emissions of greenhouse gases, and encourage the development of alternative energy sources. Addressing climate change has been a strategic priority since President Kerwin signed the American College and University Presidents' Climate Commitment in 2008, which set an ambitious goal to achieve carbon neutrality by 2020 and eliminate campus greenhouse gas emissions.

The university has developed several distinctive academic degree programs focused on sustainability, environment, and social enterprise that are producing graduates prepared to address this global challenge far beyond the campus boundaries.

AU achieved a major milestone in its business practices this summer, by entering into a long-term agreement to source half of AU's electricity from renewable power, working in a partnership with George Washington University and its hospital. This is the largest non-utility solar photovoltaic (PV) power purchase agreement in the United States and the largest PV project east of the Mississippi River. AU will receive direct, grid-delivered solar power for half of its electricity, and by directly sourcing solar power for half of the campus electricity needs, will eliminate 15,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere each year (equal to taking 3,000 cars off the road).

AU has become a leader in creating a campus culture of sustainability, as indicated by a variety of external assessments:

  • Princeton Review's "Green Honor Roll" recognized AU for four consecutive years and bestowed the highest possible score of 99.
  • AU has the highest Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STAR) score of any school ever to report to The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education.
  • AU ranked #2 in the nation for its work on climate change, according to the Sierra Club's Top Ten Cool Schools.

Going forward, we will consider additional actions that complement and enhance the substantial progress AU has already made.

ACSRI and the Finance and Investment Committee

In May 2013, the board established the Advisory Committee on Socially Responsible Investing (ACSRI) to provide guidance and input by AU community members to the board's Finance and Investment Committee on the climate change issue. ACSRI's charge was to explore options the board might consider through the management of its endowment and to address a series of critical questions the board identified (see american.edu/trustees/upload/051713.pdf.)

For the May 2014 board meeting, ACSRI presented an interim report and recommended that the board consider three options for new, meaningful actions, including:

  • Partial Divestment -from AU's endowment (focused on the Carbon 200 fossil fuel companies).
  • Investment -in alternative energy funds.
  • Engagement -with energy companies through shareholder actions.

The Finance and Investment Committee met several times to review the report and these recommendations. It received guidance from AU's General Counsel and from our Cambridge investment advisors, and it made a recommendation to the full board.

Evaluating Options for Divestment, Investment and Engagement

The issue of social responsibility in our investments introduced a new dimension to the discussion of meaningful actions on climate change beyond the university's substantial efforts to reduce its carbon footprint. It required the board to consider the impact in relation to its fiduciary responsibilities for endowment management.

AU's endowment includes funds from a number of sources and from thousands of donors over a period of more than 100 years. These donors have relied on the board's fiduciary stewardship to generate the maximum, risk adjusted return to support the scholarships, fellowships, professorships, construction, and other purposes for which the funds were given, regardless of the personal views of board members on climate change or other issues. The board's primary responsibility is to fulfill its fiduciary duty to the university.

The Finance and Investment Committee sought clarification from AU's General Counsel regarding its fiduciary duties and responsibilities in overseeing, managing, and investing university endowment funds. General Counsel cited the District of Columbia's Uniform Prudent Management of Institutional Assets (UPMIFA) Act, and its proscriptive requirements for due care in managing endowment assets. General Counsel's opinion stated that a board decision to divest would be consistent with its fiduciary duty-if the university's investment advisors could validate the premise that divestment would have an insignificant effect on investment returns.

The committee asked the university's investment advisors, Cambridge Associates, to review how divestment from the Carbon 200 would impact risk adjusted investment returns. The Cambridge advisors could not provide assurance that divestment was unlikely to have an adverse effect.

Moreover, divesting from these companies would require that AU investments be withdrawn from index funds and commingled funds in favor of more actively managed funds. Cambridge has estimated this withdrawal would cause manager fees to double, increasing from $1.1 million to $2.2 million per year.

In weighing the critical elements to partially divest, it was clear that the DC law surpassed the relevance of other considerations, including compelling arguments both for and against divestment. Since the conditions for board's primary fiduciary responsibilities cannot be satisfied, the Finance and Investment Committee concluded that divestment is not an option the board can take to express a position on climate change.

The board then considered other meaningful investment action (including affirmative investment and engagement), to support AU's broad commitment to sustainability, provided these actions are consistent with the board's primary duty.

Moving Forward: Additional Investment and Engagement Strategies

The committee recommends that efforts continue to seek positive investments in sustainable initiatives.

  • Green Investment Fund -The committee recommended and the board approved creating a green investment fund, which is consistent with another of ACSRI's recommendations. AU's investment advisors will help review and evaluate managers with input from ACSRI, an appropriate fund will be chosen, and the University will make it available for donors who specifically choose a green fund.
  • Active Management and Ongoing Review -The Committee directed Cambridge Associates to add a new criterion in its evaluation of new active managers and ongoing review of existing managers. This will require Cambridge to consider whether the managers evaluate the environmental practices and policies of a prospective investment and whether they evaluate the impact of environmental compliance, remediation, and actual or contingent environmental liabilities in determining the investment merits of a security.
  • Shareholder Engagement and Proxy Votes -The ACSRI charter includes duties of shareholder engagement, such as recommending proxy votes on shareholder resolutions and engaging in other forms of shareholder advocacy, including corporate letter writing and filing shareholder resolutions. The Finance and Investment Committee encourages this input from the ACSRI.

We know that some AU community members are disappointed that the board has chosen not to divest.

However, ACSRI's work and recommendations from the campus community have inspired vigorous discussions and prompted the board to look at meaningful ways to remain true to AU's values and support of green initiatives without jeopardizing the board's fiduciary responsibilities.

The divestment movement has highlighted the challenges of global warming as an issue requiring serious thought and ongoing action at AU. The board expects continued constructive dialogue about ways the university can pursue investment and engagement to address global warming.

Memo modified for clarity on November 24.

Completed research projects are organized below by reverse chronology:

Stochastic Demand Theory of Gene Regulation

Corinne Abolafia (MA Candidate, Mathematics)
Dr. Tuncay Alparslan (CAS/Mathematics and Statistics)

We develop a stochastic model based on continuous-time Markov chains for selection between different modes of gene regulation.

Thesis

MA Thesis, Mathematics, Stochastic Demand Theory of Gene Regulation, completed 2014

 

Exploratory Analysis of Price Changes in
Business-to-Business Sales

Dr. Karaesmen Aydin (Kogod/ITEC)

We investigate how salespeople use the information provided to them to set the prices in business-to-business transactions. Of particular interest to us is how salespeople use price recommendations coming from a decision support tool. We do this by building reduced-form models and testing those on a data set obtained by a grocery products distributor.

 

Donor Disasters or Disaster Donors:
Analysis of Data from the American Red Cross

Dr. Karaesmen Aydin (Kogod/ITEC)

There is a close relationship between donor behavior and marketing communications for every non-profit organization that relies on gifts from its donors to fund its services: Marketing communications and interactions may influence individual donor behavior and vice versa. Yet, in the end, what matters is not an individual donor and his gift but the total amount that has been collected. We participated in a research proposal competition and won an award, in the form of a data set, from the American Red Cross. In this project, we will build "explanatory" and "predictive" models to study donor behavior. Specifically, we will investigate what factors influence repeat donations, and how marketing communications influence the frequency and magnitude of giving.

 

Improving Measurements of Neighborhood Attributes at Multiple Spatial Scales Using the Geostatistical Method of Kriging

Dr. Michael Bader (CAS/Sociology)

With the growth of interest in accurately measuring neighborhood environments to study the influence of neighborhoods on individual-level outcomes, investigators have focused on improving two aspects of measurement: developing methods to create theoretically relevant measures and defining neighborhoods with relevant boundaries at appropriate spatial scales. Unfortunately, advancements made to improve the theoretical relevance of measures have been largely incompatible with defining appropriate neighborhood boundaries and vice-versa. In this paper, we argue that many neighborhood characteristics that social scientists are interested in studying should be conceptualized as changing from block-to-block rather than changing according to a patchwork of predefined discrete ecological units. We describe how a geostatistical method known as kriging can be combined with the existing econometric frameworkâ€"an innovative method for measuring theoretically relevant attributes of discrete, ecological unitsâ€"at small scales to develop city-block level estimates of theoretically nuanced measures that can then be flexibly reconfigured to multiple definitions of neighborhood boundaries. Using a cross-validation study with data from a 2002 systematic social observation of physical disorder on 1,663 city-blocks in Chicago, we show that this method creates valid results under assumptions of normality. We then demonstrate, using neighborhood measures aggregated to three different spatial scales, that the relationship between residents' perceptions of fear and neighborhood characteristics varies substantially across different spatial scales.

Publication
Bader, Michael DM, and Jennifer A. Ailshire. 2014. "Creating Measures of Theoretically Relevant Neighborhood Attributes at Multiple Spatial Scales," Sociological Methodology. Available: http://smx.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/02/07/0081175013516749.full

 

Affine Models of the Term Structure

Barton Baker, PhD candidate (CAS/Economics)

My dissertation topic is fitting and solution methods of affine models of the term structure. The first two chapters will focus on extending the applicability of informing macroeconomic variables to the pricing kernel of the time series of yields on government bonds of various maturities, focusing specifically on aggregate uncertainty (Chapter 1), and real time data (Chapter 2). This added information will be used to tested with out-of-sample tests in the U.S and possibly Europe. Chapter 3 will present a solution class written in Python and C that I wrote from scratch for affine models of the term structure and possibility present a broad theoretical approach to solving affine models of the term structure, with and without unobserved factors. Many of these calculations involve complex operations and many iterations, so the resources provided by the HPC will benefit me immensely.

Thesis or dissertation

A computational approach to affine models of the term structure, completed 2014.

 

 

Special Education Technologies

Dr. Sarah Irvine Belson (CAS/SETH)

The objective of Dr. Irvine Belson's project is to design applications that allow teachers and students with behavioral disorders to collect behavioral data using handheld devices and then to manipulate the data in a virtual, 3D environment. While self-monitoring and self-graphing have been proven to support students' acquisition of socially appropriate and academically useful behaviors (Cartledge et al., 2008, Maag 1999), there has been little development of tools that allow teachers and students to study behaviors over time and across multiple settings. The study of behaviors across settings is critical because students who fail to meet teacher expectations of social behavior are at an increased risk for unfavorable school outcomes. For example, these students have poor interactions with teachers and peers, poor academic performance, and high rates of disciplinary problems (Nowicki, 2003).  Dr. Irvine Belson has experience directing school-based research projects examining implementation of high-end technology and telecommuni-cations in the classroom.  She has trained pre-service and in-service teachers in electronic communication and technology integration, and she serves as a consultant to schools and businesses on design, implementation, and analysis of technology-based applications for instruction.

The intellectual merit of this project lies in its pedagogical innovation. The use of handheld devices to generate data on behaviors that can be quickly and cheaply visualized has the potential to transform instruction in special education. The broader impact of this program lies in the contributions to the research based on technology in education and to broader society in the effect of these tools to support long-term student achievement.

The intellectual merit of Lawrence's project lies in its potential to untangle epistemological questions stemming from the differences between the spatial orientation of Native scholars and the temporal-historical orientations of non-Native scholars (Deloria, 1992; Meyer, 2008). The reconfiguration of the history of federal Indian policy through simultaneous sedimentary (corresponding to temporal-historical) and spatial analyses has the potential to reshape the study of education history by facilitating the incorporation of rich qualitative data. The broader impact of this research will be felt in the field of educational policy studies because sedimentary analysis could, for example, help make successful school programs more easily replicable.

 

 

A Scientific Computing Toolkit for the Volunteer Grid

Dr. Michael Black (CAS/Computer Science)

Dr. Black will implement a mathematics and scientific computing toolkit that uses volunteer grid computing resources. The toolkit will equip the proposed HPC server with software to solve common mathematics problems using large-scale volunteer parallel resources and an interface allowing researchers to submit problems to the server. The server will divide the problems into sub-problems and dispatch the sub-problems to volunteers' computers to solve while they would otherwise sit idle. The toolkit will utilize the volunteer grid using the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) framework (Anderson, 2004). Existing parallel solutions to these applications generally require researchers to dedicate their own resources to the problem and to have experience with software development (Ghuloum, 2007). On the other hand, most existing BOINC projects are specialized. Software in the proposed toolkit will be designed to solve satisfiability equations, calculate gradient descent, and compute graph coloringâ€"very common problems. Dr. Black is prepared to complete this toolkit. He has published on porting the BOINC framework to new platforms (Black and Edgar, 2009) and has recently completed "proof-of-concept" satisfiability and gradient-descent solvers that use the BOINC framework. 

The intellectual merit of this research lies in its innovative code to port the sub-problems through BOINC. The broader impact of this research lies in the potential of the toolkit to harness unused computing resources to help the worldwide community of researchers quickly solve important scientific problems.
Dr. Black's long-term research goal is to create a "meta BOINC project," not tied to any application, allowing less computer-savvy researchers to use the volunteer grid in their research and giving volunteers a single place they can go to contribute to many different research projects. The proposed toolkit is the first step in this meta-project.

Geospatial Determinants of Voting Behavior

Andrew Breza (SPA/Public Policy)
Faculty Sponsor: Alan Ford (CAS/GIS/Computer Science)

Does the distance that an individual lives from a polling place affect his or her likelihood of voting? Scholars and practitioners have written thousands of articles and books on why some people choose to vote while others do not, but many of them ignore local geography or focus on individual cities. This study seeks to calculate the decision to vote based on the distance that an individual lives from a polling place. Instead of focusing on a single city, as past researchers have done, this study uses the voter registration data and 2008 and 2012 voter histories from six states in order to generalize results. Because of the diversity of the sample, distance is regressed with several other independent variables, including access to and use of public transportation, income, unemployment, dominant local industries, and several other factors. Regressions will include a logistic regression with "Voted in person" as its dependent variable, and a multinomial logit regression with three dependent variables: voted in person, voted absentee, and did not vote. This study represents a unique contribution to voting choice literature due to the size and diversity of its sample, block-level demographic data, and use of a Geographic Information System (GIS).

 

"Preliminary" Global Liquidity and Corporate Risk-Taking

Dr. Valentina Bruno (Kogod/Finance)

I plan to investigate whether global liquidity provided by the intermediary sector through cross-border capital flows has increased the corporate risk-taking by firms before the financial crisis.

Publication

Bruno, Valentina, and Hyun Song Shin. 2014. "Globalization of corporate risk taking." Journal of International Business Studies. Available: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/doifinder/10.1057/jibs.2014.12

 

 

Development of a Local Spatial Indicator of Association Based on Modified Moran's I

Jess Chen (CAS/Economics)

Local indicators of spatial association (LISAs) are used to detect clusters in spatial data. I derive and implement a LISA based on Jackson et al.'s Modified Moran's I (2010). I also conduct a simulation study to compare the power of this test against that of existing LISAs under various scenarios of underlying populations, spatial weight matrices, local and global clusters, and various degrees of data sparseness. This is one part of my dissertation, which will be on methods and applications in spatial statistics.

Presentations

"A New Local Indicator of Spatial Association," Robyn Rafferty Mathias Student Research Conference, March 2014 and Women in Stats Conference, May 2014

Thesis or dissertation

"Local Spillovers in Bankruptcy: Analysis Using Local Modified Moran's I and Other Methods" (completed Oct 2016)

Accelerating Social Science Analysis for a New Age (ASSANA): Moving from Traditional Methods for Analyzing Large Scale Text-Based Data to Socially Intelligent High-Performance Computational Methods

Dr. Derrick Cogburn (SIS/International Communication)

The purpose of this project is to develop, test, refine and disseminate a repeatable interdisciplinary methodology and a related software tool for the computer-assisted analysis of large-scale text-based social science data. In keeping with the recent MOSAIC report [30], our overarching goal is to stimulate the next generation of social science research by providing analytical resources and interdisciplinary training to conduct textual analysis in PC and HPC environments. Key deliverables will be: 1) procedures for the ASSANA methodology; 2) an open-source HPC software tool; and 3) capacity building on ASSANA through workshops, seminars, and publications.

Credit Ratings and the Cost of Municipal Financing

Kim Cornaggia (KSB/Finance and Real Estate), Jess Cornaggia, and Ryan Israelsen

Moody's recalibrated its municipal bond rating scale in 2010, resulting in upgrades of zero to four notches on $2.2 trillion of bonds. We find the upgraded bonds earn abnormal returns, increasing in upgrade magnitude. Upgraded municipalities subsequently issue more bonds, relative to non-upgraded municipalities, and the new issues have lower relative offer yields. Additional tests indicate that ratings affect bond prices and debt capacity both because ratings provide information and because higher ratings reduce regulatory compliance costs. Overall, this recalibration event sheds light on the information environment in the municipal bond market and on the real effects of ratings.

Home Bias in Credit Ratings: Evidence from Municipal Bonds

Kim Cornaggia (KSB/Finance and Real Estate), Jess Cornaggia, and Ryan Israelsen

We identify detailed characteristics of lead credit analysts on municipal bond rating reports generated by Moody's and Standard & Poor's (S&P). We employ the lead analysts' state of origin, and separately state of education, to test for home bias in ratings. Controlling for analyst education, age, gender, and tenure, along with bond-month fixed effects, we find that home analysts award significantly higher ratings (more favorable to the issuer) compared to ratings from outside analysts. The effect is increasing in credit risk and expands affected municipalities' debt capacity. The effect on offer yields varies by rater. Because the effect is driven by analysts' states of origin, but not by where analysts reside at the time they produce ratings, we conclude that our results reflect favoritism by home analysts rather than superior information.

Revolving Doors on Wall Street

Kim Cornaggia (KSB/Finance and Real Estate), Jess Cornaggia, and Han Xia

Credit analysts often leave rating agencies to work at firms they rate. These analyst transfers provide a unique laboratory for studying revolving door effects. Benchmark rating agencies provide counterfactuals which allow us to measure rating inflation in a difference-in-differences framework. We find that analysts transitioning to managerial positions and to top banks become more favorable to their future employers prior to their transitions. Further, these conflicted ratings become less responsive to changes in market-based measures of hiring firms' credit quality. Our results reveal the presence of previously untested forces that affect information production by credit analysts.

Terrorist Attacks During Ramadan

Suat Cubukcu, Instructor, SPA/JLC

In this project, I would like to analyse the distribution of terrorist attacks during holy month Ramadan and other times.

Disasters, Federal Disaster Relief Policy,
and Bankruptcy Filings

Matthew Davis (CAS/Econ)

Bankruptcy is an important social program that annually results in the transfer of $42 billion from creditors to debtors, and its use has been increasing. According to the adverse events hypothesis, bankruptcy filings are triggered by a shock that pushes individuals "over the edge." Natural disasters are an important example of such a shock that affects many Americans. It has been noted that the bankruptcy rate increases in the period following hurricanes (Lawless, 2005). It is currently unknown how large this effect is, whether it pertains to other disaster types, or whether public funds expended to aid recovery following large disasters have an appreciable mitigating effect on such increases. This research project uses a new data set combining information on disasters, disaster declarations, and bankruptcy filings to determine the extent to which natural disasters increase bankruptcy rates and the extent to which different types of government aid mitigate increases.

Thesis or Dissertation

The Political Economy of National Disasters, Bankruptcy and Federal Disaster Aid, completed 2016.

Solving Twisty Puzzles

Donna Dietz (CAS/Mathematics)

Many solutions abound for the well-known Rubik's Cube puzzle. Similarly, any "twisty puzzle" made up of regular corner/edge/center pieces can be solved using basic tools of abstract algebra. However, if a sufficient number of pieces are fused together, a "bandaged puzzle" emerges, and the mathematics behind this is very complicated. In fact, it is known to be at least NP-hard, as a class of puzzles. All bandaging patterns for the standard Rubik's Cube have been solved, but beyond this, there is still much which is unknown about this class of puzzles. For a further explanation of the ideas in this paragraph, please see Jaap Scherphuis' explanation at: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/pspace.htm

The project we are currently working on is to count (or estimate) the color-free configurations of a particular bandaging pattern for the Megaminx. The Megaminx is a dodecahedral puzzle with each face having a center, 5 edges, and 5 corners. The bandaging pattern we are investigating is one we found a pattern for on an internet chat board for twisty puzzles. (The thread is presently at: http://www.twistypuzzles.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=18677)

Analysis of Periodic Point Processes

Kevin Duke (CAS/Mathematics)

Our work focuses on extracting information from periodic point processes. These problems arise in numerous situations, from radar pulse repetition interval analysis to bit synchronization in communication systems. We divide our analysis into two cases: periodic processes created by a single source, and those processes created by several sources. We wish to extract the fundamental period of the generators, and, in the second case, to deinterleave the processes. We are developing efficient algorithms for extracting the fundamental period from a set of sparse and noisy observations of single and multiple source periodic processes. The algorithms are computationally straightforward, stable with respect to noise, and converges quickly.

Dr. Boris Gershman (CAS/Economics)

This project is an exploratory analysis of the role that banks play in supporting the mechanism of exchange. It considers a model economy in which exchange activities are facilitated and coordinated by a self-organizing network of entrepreneurial trading firms. Collectively, these firms play the part of the Walrasian auctioneer, matching buyers with sellers and helping the economy to approximate equilibrium prices that no individual is able to calculate. Banks affect macroeconomic performance in this economy because their lending activities facilitate entry of trading firms and also influence their exit decisions. Both entry and exit have conflicting effects on performance, and we resort to computational analysis to understand how they are resolved. Our analysis sheds new light on the conflict between micro-prudential bank regulation and macroeconomic stability. Specifically, it draws an important distinction between "normal" performance of the economy and "worst-case" scenarios, and shows that micro prudence conflicts with macro stability only in bad times. The analysis also shows that banks provide a "financial stabilizer" that in some respects can more than counteract the more familiar financial accelerator.

 

Information Theoretic Modeling

Dr. Amos Golan (CAS/Economics/Info-Metrics Institute)
Dr. Heath Henderson (Research Associate, Info-Metrics Institute)
Skipper Seabold (PhD Candidate, Economics)

This project, joint with Heath Henderson and Skipper Seabold, develops an improved information-theoretic estimator. It is a computational semi-intensive method that has proved to dominate other traditional methods for all finite and complex data.

Ground Delay Programs

Justin Grana (CAS/Economics)

We examine the potential for a simple auction to allocate arrival slots during Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) more efficiently than the currently used system. The analysis of these auctions uses Predictive Game Theory (PGT) , a new approach that produces a probability distribution over strategies instead of an equilibrium set. Furthermore, the game we consider is one of imperfect information and we show how averaging over priors still generates quantities of interest from the PGT distribution. We find that the second-price slot auction has the potential to lower social costs but further analysis is needed to determine which pre-GDP schedules are best suited for an auction.

Publication
Decision-Theoretic Prediction and Policy Design of GDP Slot Auctions," American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2014-2163, J. Bono, D. Wolpert, D. Xie, and J. Grana, June 2014."

 

Listening to Noise

Justin Grana (CAS/Economics)
Faculty Sponsor: Alan Isaac (CAS/Econ)

Attempting to see if noise in trader activity influences the behavior of institutional traders.

The Effect of Federal Subsidies on the
Outcomes of Children in Foster Care

Dr. Mary Eschelbach Hansen & Dr. Kara Reynolds (CAS/Economics)

Drs. Hansen and Reynolds will simulate the effect of extending federal subsidies to all children in foster care on the health outcomes of child victims of abuse and neglect. Currently, state child welfare systems cannot claim the same federal support for all of the children in foster care. States therefore have an incentive to provide more services to children who are eligible for federal support. This project will be the first to measure the extent to which eligibility for federal support influences services provided and health outcomes, and it will be the first to simulate the effect of broadening federal support to all children in foster care. It is critically important to understand how the structure of federal incentives affects outcomes because over $25 billion in child welfare services are provided annually to nearly a million children (DeVooght, Allen, and Geen, 2008). Dr. Hansen's expertise is in the economics of foster care policy. Hansen and Hansen (2006) and Hansen (2007, 2008) have shown that children who are eligible for federal subsidies for adoption after foster care get higher levels of support. The proposed project extends the work to consider health outcomes and services provided while children are still in foster care. Dr. Reynolds brings to the project her expertise in structural modeling (Feinberg and Reynolds, 2010; Reynolds (nee Olson, 2004), which is the preferred, but computationally-intensive, method for estimation of underlying policy invariant parameters in the policy simulation (Heckman, 2000).

Standards of Proof in Child Welfare 

Mary Eschelbach Hansen (CAS/Econ), Nick Kahn (SPA/DPAP), and Josh Gupta-Kagan (Univ. of South Carolina School of Law) 

We study the extent to which differences between states in the standards of proof required at the various stages of a case of child abuse or neglect influence the outcomes of the case.We use administrative data on all reports of child abuse and neglect as captured in the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System, and we study the substantiation decision, the filing of a juvenile petition, and the decision to place children into foster care. 

Presentation

"The Standard of Proof in the Substantiation of Child Abuse and Neglect," George Mason University Public Choice Seminar, March 4, 2015.

Publication

Nicholas E. Kahn, Mary Eschelbach Hansen, and Josh Gupta-Kagan, "The Standard of Proof in the Substantiation of Child Abuse and Neglect", forthcoming in Journal of Empirical Legal Studies.

Ideological or Strategic? Using Electoral Loss to Understand Contribution Motivations

Brian Hamel 

Political scientists have long noted the ideological nature of individual campaign contributors. Relative to PAC contributors, individuals are motivated by policy goals and seek to support candidates closest to their ideological ideal point. Yet, a similar line of research also argues that individual contributors tend to disperse their money across the country to ideological/partisan friends running in competitive elections. This project seeks to disentangle these two related, yet often times distinct motivations for individual campaign contributions: ideology and strategy. I argue that one can better understand the motivations of contributors by examining how contributors respond (in subsequent cycles) to losing elections. If contributors continue to contribute in the aftermath of loss (particularly persistent loss over time), then we can take this as an indicator of ideological motivations. By answering the open empirical question about how contributors respond to electoral loss, we can better understand campaign contributors. With an innovative empirical approach and an exhaustive behavioral measure of motivations, this research project is uniquely positioned to answer this question.

  

Exploiting Entanglement for Simulation of Few Body Systems

Dr. Nathan Harshman (CAS/Physics)
Team Members: Noel Klingler, Ryan Tillis

The goal of this project is to characterize entanglement in few body systems, and then to use this knowledge to optimize calculation and computation of few body dynamics. Few body systems are important at many physical scales, but this project will focus on atomic systems because implementations of quantum information processing devices, like ultracold atoms in optical lattices, require a precise understanding of few body dynamics. For example, few body effects are limiting sources of decoherence and loss in atomic interferometer experiments. The key to this method is that it finds a natural basis for efficient computation by choosing observables to describe the system such that energy eigenstates have minimal entanglement. For each additional particle in a simulation, complexity grows rapidly, and increases in efficiency become critical. More generally, studying entanglement is a theoretical probe that exposes kinematic and dynamical symmetries in both bound state and scattering problems. In this light, characterizing entanglement in few body systems shows how preferred physical observables are selected by the interactions even in complicated multiparticle systems. The outcomes of this project will include specific computational applications to cold atom systems and general results about entanglement in few body systems.

Presentation

J. Revels, N.L. Harshman, Poster: "Optimized basis transformations for the symmetrization of a few ultra-cold atoms in a harmonic trap," APS March Meeting, Denver, March 2014.

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Three Essays on the Interaction of Fiscal Shocks and Budgetary Constraints on the Public Education Sector

Michael Hayes (SPA)

My dissertation examines how budgetary constraints on school districts create a host of challenges for public managers, including higher levels of teacher turnover, as well as an unequal distribution of state funding across school districts. I plan to use the HPC to run bootstrapped quantile regressions.

Thesis or Dissertation

Three Essays on the Interaction of Fiscal Shocks and Budgetary Constraints on the Public Education Sector, completed 2014.

Modern Value Chains and the Organization of Agrarian Production

Heath Henderson and Alan G. Isaac (both CAS/Econ)

Empirical studies of agrarian production in developing countries often find that smallholders possess a productivity advantage over large farms. Eswaran and Kotwal famously derive this inverse farm-size/productivity relationship from the structure of agrarian production. Their model predicts that in otherwise equivalent economies a more egalitarian land distribution raises output and producer welfare. However, developing countries have experienced the rapid emergence of modern value chains. Recent research provides evidence that this transformation alters the welfare possibilities of agrarian economies. We therefore extend the Eswaran-Kotwal model by incorporating a modern value chain. In our model, the inverse farm-size/productivity relationship persists, but we contradict previous sanguine conclusions about egalitarian redistributions of the means of production. We find a potential equity/efficiency tradeoff in the distribution of land.

Thesis or Dissertation

"Nicaragua, the food crisis, and the future of smallholder agriculture"

Publication

Heath Henderson, Alan G. Isaac; Modern Value Chains and the Organization of Agrarian Production. American Journal of Agricultural Econonomics, 2017 aaw092. doi: 10.1093/ajae/aaw092

 

Designing Novel Many-Body Quantum States of Ultracold Atoms using Dynamically Transforming Optical Lattices

Dr. Philip R. Johnson (CAS/Physics)

The objective of Dr. Johnson's research is to develop and simulate a new method for creating and probing quantum states of ultracold matter not ordinarily existing in nature. He will use dynamical transformation of optical lattice potentials. Optical lattices are, essentially, crystals of light that can hold and control atoms suspended at the potential minima in a vacuum.  The shapes of optical lattices can be dynamically transformed by manipulation of laser beams.  Dr. Johnson will simulate the creation of quantum states by a sequence of single-well splitting and double-well merging operations on arbitrary pairings of adjacent lattice sites.  Experimental tests of the simulations are within reach of leading experimental groups, including Dr. Johnson's collaborators at the Joint Quantum Institute of NIST and the University of Maryland, but experiments have not been performed because of the complexity of the modeling required to understand the physics. Dr. Johnson's previous work using numerical simulations of the macroscopic quantum mechanics of superconducting qubits uses similar methods (Johnson, 2003; Berkley 2003) and he has the requisite knowledge of optical lattices to carry out this work (Spielman, 2007; Johnson, 2009).

This research has intellectual merit because it designs a fundamentally new method for studying many-body states with optical lattices and because it is likely to yield explicit predictions that can be tested in the lab.  Optical lattices have great promise as analogs for studying quantum phase transitions; therefore, the broader impact of the work is that it will contribute to the important goal of designing revolutionary materials such as high-temperature superconductors.

Publications

S. Paul, P.R. Johnson, E. Tiesinga, "Hubbard model for ultracold bosonic atoms interacting via zero-point-energy-induced three-body interactions", Physical Review A 93, 043616 (2016).

K.W. Mahmud, E. Tiesinga, P.R. Johnson, "Dynamically decoupled three-body interactions with applications to interaction-based quantum metrology", Physical Review A 90, 041602 Rapid Communications (2014). Selected as "Editors Suggestion".

X.Y. Yin, D. Blume, P.R. Johnson, E. Tiesinga, "Universal and nonuniversal effective N-body interactions for ultracold harmonically trapped few-atom systems", Physical Review A 90, 043631 (2014). Selected as "Editors Suggestion".

K.W. Mahmud, L. Jiang, P.R. Johnson, E. Tiesinga, "Collapse and revivals for systems of short-range phase coherence", New Journal of Physics 16, 103009 (2014).

K.W. Mahmud, L. Jiang, E. Tiesinga, P.R. Johnson, "Bloch oscillations and quench dynamics of interaction bosons in an optical lattice", Physical Review A 89, 023606 (2014).

E. Tiesinga, P.R. Johnson, "Quadrature interferometry for nonequilibrium ultracold atoms in optical lattices", Physical Review A 87, 013423 (2013).

P.R. Johnson, D. Blume, X.Y. Yin, W. Flynn, E. Tiesinga, "Effective renormalized multi-body interactions of harmonically confined ultracold neutral bosons", New Journal of Physics 14, 053037 (2012).

Presentations

"Collapse-and-revival and effective interactions in optical lattices", Washington State University, Department Colloquium, Pullman, WA (March, 2015)

"Influence of trap anisotropy and dimensionality on perturbative effective 2- and 3- body interactions", Institute of Nuclear Theory, Program on Universality in Few Body Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (April, 2014).

"Effective multibody interactions of confined ultracold bosons", 2013 Annual Meeting of the Division of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics (DAMOP) of the American Physical Society (APS), Quebec, Canada (June 2013).

 

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Land Titling and Investment in Sub Saharan Africa

Woubet Kassa Independent research student (CAS/Economy)

The role of property rights in resource allocation has been one of the central themes in development economics. There has existed extensive theoretical arguments that property rights in land are closely associated with the allocative efficiency of agricultural resources as well as investment decisions. However, empirical findings have not been conclusive. This has been complicated due to possible endogeneity of titles, unobserved hetrogeneities and the non-experimental nature of the data. This study employs various econometric tools to address these challenges using the Living Standards Measurement Study surveys of six Sub-Sahran African countries.

Measuring Economic Uncertainty in US States 

Jeff Levy

This paper uses a database of primarily small, local news sources to assemble US state-level economic uncertainty measures. We report the quantity of news related to both uncertainty and a collection of economic terms as a share of the total news volume in the given time and place. The economic terms reflect local concerns focusing mainly on regionally-important industries, jobs and budgeting. This improves upon existing economic uncertainty measures in several ways. Existing measures are generally presented at the national level, which has the advantage of accommodating the use of common macroeconomic indicators, such as stock market volatility or GDP and inflation forecasts. The disadvantage is the loss of information inherent in such aggregation, particularly in a country as large and diverse as the United States where conditions in one state may vary widely from conditions in another. While news based indices do not necessarily suffer from this data constraint, in practice all existing measures we are aware of are national in scale, and maintain a focus on policy and finance that we show misses important signals of economic uncertainty. The data covers all 50 states from 1995 to 2015, and the results track well with both reasonable expectations and, in the case of non-war and non-terrorism related economic uncertainty, act as a leading indicator of state unemployment rates. When the process is re-run with more traditional policy and finance search terms, neither is true.

 

Revolutionary Pathways: The Effects of Domestic Revolutions

Edward Lucas (SIS)

How much and in what ways do individual leaders matter for international politics? This paper sheds new light on these questions by considering the consequences of domestic revolutions in international relations. We argue that revolutions have international effects due to two separate pathways, one associated with the event and one associated with the new leader's administration. In the first pathway, a revolutionary event disrupts established relationships and perceptions, both within the state and abroad. In the second pathway, revolutions put individuals into office who are more willing to challenge the status quo, and who have publicly committed to a sustained shift in policies during their administration. These two distinct pathways suggest that the important question about revolutions is not whether leaders or events matter most, but rather the conditions under which they matter. Consequently, we studied these pathways on three phenomena: international economic sanctions, domestic economic growth, and interstate alliances. We find that revolutionary events have a short-term negative effect on domestic economic growth, while revolutionary leaders have a long-term effect on the probability that a revolutionary state is targeted for sanctions. Both the revolutionary leader and its immediate events alter the state's international alliances. Our findings suggest that no single level of analysis completely dominates, and the answer depends on the outcome of interest.

Presentation

Edward Lucas, "Revolutionary Pathways: Leaders and the International Impacts of Domestic Revolutions" American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, 2015

Publications

Colgan, Jeff, and Edward Lucas, "Revolutionary Pathways: Leaders and the International Impacts of Domestic Revolutions" International Interactions [forthcoming].

Colgan, Jeff, and Edward Lucas, "Revolutionary Pathways: Leaders and the International Impacts of Domestic Revolutions" International Interactions [forthcoming].

Robust Long-Term Streamflow Forecasting

Dr. Inga Maslova (CAS/Mathematics & Statistics)

The objective of this research project is to develop and demonstrate a new data-driven modeling approach to provide long-term forecasts of streamflow. The modeling approach will incorporate wavelet-based analysis techniques used in statistical signal processing and a multivariate relevance vector machine (MVRVM) that uses a Bayesian regression method. We will develop a methodology that detects patterns in changes in Pacific sea surface temperature (SST), snowpack and streamflow using wavelet decomposition. This information will then be used to improve the forecasting potential of the MVRVM.

Publication

I. Maslova,, A. M. Ticlavilca, and M. McKee, Adjusting wavelet-based multiresolution analysis boundary conditions for long-term streamflow forecasting. Hydrol. Process.,30: 5774. doi: 10.1002/hyp.10564, 2016

Genetic Algorithms for Experimental Design

Ryan Moore (SPA/Government)

Blocking before treatments are assigned can improve the precision of causal estimates, make experimental estimates more robust to unlucky randomizations or inadequate parametric adjustment, and preserve power, even in relatively small group-randomized trials. But how should experimentalists best incorporate valuable covariate information into blocked designs? We focus on the critical question of setting the covariate weights that define the extent to which experimental units are similar or different. Using simulated and applied data, we assess the relative performance of covariate weights derived from two sources: first, from genetic matching algorithms which explicitly seek to optimize balance; second, from Mahalanobis distances without explicit balance-seeking. We show that balance in randomized experiments that use genetic covariate reweighting is superior to that obtained by random allocation, but also by Mahalanobis-metric blocking alone, even when done optimally. Further, we show that a genetic algorithm can directly improve the robustness of a design to unobserved confounding when tuned to do so. Our results provide guidance for experimentalists and offer new insights about how to improve practice in experimental design.

 

Exchanging Fire: Trade, Conflict, and the Strategic Incentives of Indirect Economic Interdependence

David Ohls (SIS)

How do indirect economic participation in common global networks of production and trade dampen conflict incentives between antagonistic pairs of states? Using a formal model of resource allocation in the context of dyadic conflict, I show that latent economic interdependence reduces fighting incentives. I then test this empirically using dyad-year panel data from 1948 to 2000. I find evidence consistent with the hypothesis that mutual reliance on the same outside trading partner and densely-linked trade networks strongly decreases the likelihood of interstate disputes and increases scores on conflict-cooperation scales. This effect is particularly strong in rivalrous dyads, which frequently come into conflict; although such pairs of states tend to have have limited direct economic engagement, they often share great underlying structural potential for cooperation. These results have important implications for theoretical research on the links between economics and security, dyadic rivalries, and the role of third parties in international disputes.

 

Forecasting Financial Data with Agent Based Models

PhD Candidate Georgi Panterov (CAS/Economics)

The purpose of this research is to build a rich, multi-agent artificial stock market where agents have endogenous expectations. Agents are able to act as sophisticated econometricians employing modern methods like Artificial Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms. Unlike in standard financial models, agents are able to learn and update expectations using various Bayesian and non-Bayesian rules. This project will build a model that replicates some of the standard characteristics of financial markets such as volatility clustering and fat tail return distributions. At the end, there will be an attempt to calibrate the model using some real world price/orders data.

 

Examining Differential International Responses to HIV/AIDS

Dr. Nathan Paxton (SIS)

This project explores the role that organizational learning processes play in state HIV/AIDS policy development. The puzzle addressed is the large degree of variation in policy output across states that are similar in terms of political or economic character. Although one can tell individual stories about each country, the overall variation defies the cross-applicability of many typical explanations. Where states better draw lessons from experience we should expect two results. First, structural characteristics of the state or of the set of HIV policy responders affects the character and degree of learning: the configuration of decision-making authority and information analytics interacts with the learning process, affecting the lessons drawn and policies pursued. Second, over time we observe some degree of policy convergence among states due to comparison and adaptation from others. The dissertation employs a mixed-methods approach. As a plausibility probe, econometric analysis tests for such patterns. The research employs an original dataset of 72 countries over 6 years and approximately 25 variables. To address data missingness, multiple imputation techniques were used. There were statistically and substantively significant relationships and patterns, indicating further exploration of the underlying processes.

 

Color vision and hyperspectral images

Dr. Arthur Shapiro (CAS/Psychology)

The laboratory is investigating various aspects of color vision. In particular, we are analyzing hyperspectral images in order to develop algorithms to defeat camouflage of human-made objects.

 

An Adaptive Truncated Product Method

Dr. Xuguang Sheng (CAS/Economics)

In the multiple testing literature, Zaykin et al. (2002) developed a truncated product method that combines only those p-values less than some pre-specified threshold, but the lack of a clear choice of truncation point becomes a major obstacle to its more widespread use. We solve this problem by proposing an adaptive truncated product method that optimizes the selection of the truncation point among a set of candidate cut-off values. We then develop a bootstrap re-sampling procedure to efficiently estimate the distribution of the adaptive method. We illustrate the performance of the proposed method through Monte Carlo simulation and an empirical example in the context of panel cointegration tests.

Publications

Sheng, X. and L. Cheng, Combinations of "Combinations of P-values," forthcoming in Empirical Economics

Sheng, X. and J Yang, Truncated Product Methods for Panel Unit Root Tests (2013), Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, vol. 75, pp. 624-636.

Sheng, X. and J Yang, An Adaptive Truncated Product Method for Combining Dependent P-values (2013), Economics Letters, vol. 119, pp. 180-182.

Presentations

2nd Annual Conference of the International Association for Applied Econometrics (IAAE), Thessaloniki, Greece, 2015

22nd Symposium of the Society for Nonlinear Dynamics and Econometrics (SNDE), New York, NY, 2014

American Economic Association (AEA) Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, 2012

North American Summer Meeting of the Econometric Society, St. Louis, MO, 2011

 

Comorbidity of ASD and ADHD in the Brain

Devon Shook, Independent Research Student (BCAN/CAS)

Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder are two of the most commonly diagnosed developmental disorders and often co-occur in the same child. Neuroimaging research on both disorders has consistently found the cerebellum to be a site of structural and functional abnormality. However, until the DSM-5 allowed for a comorbid diagnosis, study of their shared etiology has been a challenge. In the present study, we investigate the structural and functional abnormalities of comorbid ASD and ADHD with a particular focus on the cerebellum.

Migration, Population Imbalance and Decentralization in Indonesia

Smriti Tiwari Independent research student (CAS/Economics)

Most studies on migration focus on the impact of migration and/or remittances on the economic development of the migrant sending countries. But would better opportunities at home generated through economic development deter migrants? By using the unique features of decentralization in Indonesia, this paper aims to get at the role of local development on migration behaviors. In the case of Indonesia, it will also shed light on its implications, if any, on the differences in population pressures.

Thesis or Dissertation

Development and migration interactions using natural experiments, completed 2015

Publication

Smriti Tiwari. Does Local Development Influence Outmigration Decisions? Evidence from Indonesia. Forthcoming in World Development http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2016.12.028

Fundamentals, Derivatives Market Information,
and Oil Price Volatility

Jonathan Wallen and Michael Robe (KSB/Finance and Real Estate)

We investigate price volatility in the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) and Brent crude oil markets between 2000 and 2014. We provide empirical evidence of a relationship between the term structure of option-implied volatilities and global macroeconomic conditions, physical market fundamentals (OPEC surplus output capacity, oil storage) and economy-wide financial uncertainty (captured by the equity VIX). Based on public data regarding trader positions in U.S. futures markets, the intensity of oil speculation is statistically insignificant. Unexpected disruptions in the crude oil space are associated with large regression residuals. Our findings suggest that derivatives ("paper") markets contain information on the magnitude and duration of major oil market disruptions.

Publication

Robe, Michel A., and Jonathan Wallen. "Fundamentals, Derivatives Market Information and Oil Price Volatility." Journal of Futures Markets 36, no. 4 (2016): 317-344. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/fut.21732/full

 

Characterization of Felid SINEs

Kathryn Walters-Conte (CAS/Biology)

Short-interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) comprise a class of nuclear DNA that can define evolutionary history. Abundant in mammalian genomes, these transposable elements can characterize lineages. A SINE family'CanSINE' has been described in the order Carnivora. We are pursing examination of these motifs in the Feliformia suborder (cat-like animals) and Felidae family (cats) with respect to the distribution of conserved and non-conserved insertion sites, the utility of these sequences as markers for hybridized cats and the implementation of SINEs as tools in undergraduate education.

Internal grant proposal
"Transposable Elements as Markers of Hybrid Felines and Beacons of Cellular Diversity" 2014.

 

On the roots of truncated hypergeometric series
over prime fields

Dr. Kenneth Ward We consider natural truncations of the hypergeometric functions 2F1, 3F2, and the Kummer hypergeometric functions 1F1 over the finite field Fp, for primes p. For the associated polynomials Q (of degree proportional to p), we obtain bounds for the number of roots of various congruences Q modulo p, which correspond to rational point counts where methods from algebraic geometry fail. Via a correspondence to families of elliptic curves, we obtain sharp bounds in some cases. We also show that the functions 2F1 and 3F2 are associated with K3 surfaces, including some previously studied for their modularity. For the Kummer hypergeometrics, we obtain a power saving for a large class of the parameter values within an algebraic closure of Fp by modification of methods from transcendence theory.

Presentations

"Cyclotomy in finite field arithmetic," Keynote speech, Algebra seminar, University of Pennsylvania, 2016.

"Factoring curves over finite fields," Talk, Number Theory Seminar, Dartmouth College, 2016.

"A few open problems in lifting," Paper presentation, Mathematics Seminar, University of Athens, Greece, 2016.

 

Gender Impact of Malawi Input Subsidy

Paul Winters (CAS/Economics) and Wendy Karamba (CAS/Economics)

Alleviating gender differences in agricultural productivity is not only a matter of equity but it is vital for poverty reduction. While a number of studies suggest that gender differences in agricultural productivity are a result of female farmers having limited access to resources, few studies investigate the role of agricultural interventions in alleviating the constraints to input use and subsequently the gender gap in productivity. For the first time, this study investigates whether there are gendered gains in agricultural productivity from participating in an input subsidy program. Using nationally-representative data that is disaggregated at the plot level, this study analyzes the large-scale voucher-based Farm Input Subsidy Program in Malawi. Focusing on the total value of output per hectare, the relationships are evaluated using weighted estimators where the weights are constructed from propensity scores since beneficiaries are not randomly selected. Spatial fixed effects are employed to deal with the unobservables that may confound the relationship between program participation and productivity. 

Publication

Karamba, R. Wendy, and Paul C. Winters. "Gender and agricultural productivity: implications of the Farm Input Subsidy Program in Malawi." Agricultural Economics 46, no. 3 (2015): 357-374.

Cost-Effectiveness of a Lifeline Telephone Crisis Center for Reducing Emergency Department Visits and Preventing Suicide, 2009-2014

Brian Yates (CAS/Psychology) and Katheryn Ryan (PhD candidate)

Suicide is a serious public health problem with considerable societal costs. However, few previous studies have compared the costs of suicide prevention programs to positive outcomes for society as well as the individual. Suicide prevention hotlines are widespread and provide suicide prevention for callers in crisis. However, the cost-effectiveness of such hotlines is unknown. This study will obtain data from a large Lifeline call center serving a tri-state area in the United States for the period January 1, 2009 to January 1, 2014. We will test whether the empirically-based Lethality Assessment conducted by Lifeline workers leads high-risk callers to seek emergency department (ED) services. As EDs can be over-utilized by suicidal persons, we hypothesize that Lifeline can triage only those callers who need immediate medical care. Lifeline is a low-cost option to ED care for low-risk callers. This research includes the immediate and direct costs of preventable ED visits related to suicide. Additionally, we hypothesize that Lifeline is a cost-effective suicide prevention program in that it increases Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) for high-risk callers who receive ED care. The cost-utility analysis of QALYs will examine, whether the cost of operating Lifeline yields an economic benefit a low incremental cost ratio for service operations compared to QALYs gained.

Thesis or Dissertation

Katheryn Ryan, Costs, benefits, and quality-adjusted life years of a lifeline crisis center, 2009 through 2013," completed 2015.

Working paper

Katheryn Ryan and Brian Yates, Costs, Benefits, and Quality Adjusted Life Years of a Lifeline Crisis Center, 2009 through 2013

 

Back to top

Administrative History

Faculty governance at American University has changed over time. In its first incarnation, the governing body consisted of the Chancellor of the University, the Deans of the University, and the officers of instruction. The faculty proposed requirements for admission, courses of study, conditions of graduation, nature of degrees to be conferred, rules and methods of conduct, candidates for degrees, fellowships, awards and prizes, investigated student misconduct, and established rules for regulating student activities and clubs. By 1940, the faculty had grown significantly and a restructuring was required. The new governing body consisted of the President of the University, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, Dean of the Graduate School, professors, associate professors and assistant professors.

By 1942, the University established individual faculties for the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Social Sciences and Public Affairs. The first standing committees (admissions and academic standards) were established in 1942. The standing committees were expanded to include the following: committee on committees, committee on educational policy, committee on admissions, library committee, student personnel committee, and committee on faculty relationships in 1953. The University Senate was established in 1963. The Provost serves as Chairman. The University Senate has twenty-one voting members who are elected by entire University faculty. Standing committees include: executive committee, committee on faculty relations, committee on student relations, committee on athletics, and committee on undergraduate admissions and scholarships.


Scope and Content Note

This series consists of agendas, correspondence, minutes, publications, and reports documenting faculty governance at American University from 1922 to the present.


RECORDS INVENTORY

University Faculty
Proceedings

  • 1922-1926
  • 1938-1941
  • 1942-1957

Faculty & Executive Committee of the Faculty
Proceedings 1957-1963

University Senate
Minutes - 1963-2004 (bound volumes)

Box 1
Committee Files
Academic Development 1977-78
Academic Advising Committee 1981 [2 folders]
Ad Hoc Committees (general) 1980-94 [2 folders]
Ad Hoc Committees on:

  • Assessment 1988-1990
  • Continuing Education 1968-70
  • Dining Facilities 1968-71
  • English Requirements 1969-71
  • Faculty Club 1968-69
  • Foreign Languages 1969
  • Grading and Inflation 1991-1992
  • Interdisciplinary Studies 1969-70
  • Intersession 1968-72
  • Mission Statement 1970
  • Refinement of the Grading System 1965-66
  • Registration and Schedule 1968-69
  • Social Sciences 1965-66
  • Space Planning 1996
  • Teaching and Learning 1968-70
  • Tenure and Temporary Faculty Issues 1999-2000
  • University Operations 1972-73
  • University Requirements 1964-68
  • Withdrawal Policy 1966

Ad Hoc Committee to:

  • Define the Bachelor of Arts Degree 1968
  • Study the Special Academic Problems of Foreign Students 1962

Ad Hoc Women’s Committee 1972-1975, 1975-1976, 1976-1979 [3 folders]
Administration Evaluation 1983-86
Administration Review 1993-94
Admissions 1960-63, 1969, 1986 [4 folders]
Advisory Committee on Advising 1991-93
Advisory Committee on Search and Evaluation 1972-1978
Advisory Committee on Sexual Harassment 1991
Advisory Committee on Sponsored Research 1969
Annual Reports from various committees 1967-69, 1972-73, 1982-92 [6 folders]

Box 2
Committee Files (continued)
Annual Reports from various other committees (continued) 1992-2001 [8 folders]
Athletics 1951-62, 1966-68, 1986-89, 1991-1999, 2001-2002 [6 folders]
Budget Advisory 1969-1970, 1993-95, 1997-2004 (continued) [10 folders]

  • Purchasing Committee 1998-2004 [7 folders]

Box 3
Committee Files (continued)
Calendar and Scheduling 1977-81
Commencement 1967-71
Community Service and Studies 1992-1995
Computer Resources 1979-99 [6 folders]
Conference Committee 1969
Curriculum and Academic Programs 2002-2004
Curriculum Problems 1958-66 [2 folders]
Educational Policy 1961-63, 1973 [3 folders]
Employee Benefits 1983-1984, 1988-1993 [5 folders]
Equity 1986-1989, 1990-99, 2001-2004 [3 folders]
Evaluation 1972-1991, 1991-1995 [2 folders]
Executive 1960-1969, 1973, 1985-1987 [5 folders]

Box 4
Committee Files (continued)
Executive Committee (continued) 1988-2002 [8 folders]
Facilities and Services 1980-90
Faculty Benefits 1985-2000 [5 folders]
Faculty Development 1971-75, 1986-1988, 1994, 1997, 1999-2001 [4 folders]
Faculty Grievances 1986-2000 [2 folders]
Faculty Relations (FRC) 1962-2003 [8 folders]
FRC Annual Reports 1971-93

Box 5
Committee Files (continued)
FRC Open Meetings 1980-92, 1999-2001 [2 folders]
FRC Reports and Recommendations 1965
Faculty Workload 1993
Finance 1964-1983, 1986-1996 [21 folders]

Box 5a
Committee Files (continued)
Finance (continued) 1996-2000 [3 folders]
Food Services 1990-91 [2 folders]
General Education 1963-1964, 1976-79, 1987-1994 [4 folders]

Box 6
Committee Files (continued)
Graduate Studies 1964-94 [21 folders]

Box 7
Committee Files (continued)
Graduate Studies (continued) 1994-2002 [13 folders]
Graduate Studies – Academic Grievance 1998
Information Services 2002-2004
Interdisciplinary Studies 1974-80 [2 folders]
Internal Governance 1976, 1977 [2 folders]
International Programs and Students 1977-98, 2000-2001 [2 folders]
Library 1958-2002 [6 folders]
Lower Division 1962
Middle States Steering Committee (n.d.)
Nominating 1968, 1986, 1988, 1994
Obstacles and Incentives 1999-2000
Physical Plant and Services 1990-94, 1997-98 [3 folders]

Box 8
Committee Files (continued)
Priorities 1980
Program Review 1985, 1993-94
Research 1967-69, 1973-74, 1980-2001 [8 folders]
Research, Open Meeting 2000-2001
Student Learning and Academic Engagement 2003-2004
Student Life 1962, 2002-2003 [2 folders]
Student Personnel 1961-62
Student Publications 1965-1969
Student Relations 1964-1969, 1973, 1980-1987, 1990-2001 [9 folders]
Study of the Relationships of Policies of the School and the College 1949
Summer Sessions 1971, 1976-77, 1981-82, 1985-88
Undergraduate Admissions, Scholarships and Financial Aid 1963-81, 1986-87 1992-2001 [7 folders]
Undergraduate Studies 1969-1972

Box 9
Committee Files (continued)
Undergraduate Studies (continued) 1973-2000 [24 folders]

Box 10
Committee Files (continued)
Undergraduate Studies (continued.) 2001-2002 [2 folders]
Undergraduate Studies, General Education Program Review 1993
University Curricula 1960-61
University Evaluation 1965-69
University Requirements 1947-53, 1963-68 [2 folders]
Ward Circle Planning Committee 1996
Women’s Concerns 1978-81

Administrative Files Academic Regulations 1990-1994, 1997-2000 [2 folders]
AU 85 Oct. 24, 1980
AU 100 1987-1992
AU 2000 1990-1991
Awards and Proposals 1988-1994
Berendzen Resignation 1990
Board of Trustees 1969, 1977-1983, 1988-1997 [3 folders]
By-Laws and Act of Incorporation 1990-2000
Campus Conversations (Strategic Plan) 2000-2001
Ceremony to Honor Retiring and 25-year Faculty 1986-1993 [2 folders]
Chairmen of the University Senate 1963-1999
Conduct Council 1968-1995
Copyright Issues 1991
Degrees, Majors, Minors, and Certificates 1992
Distinguished Faculty Lectures 1984-2003 [3 folders]
Elections 1990-1995, 1994-1995, 2002 [3 folders]
Election Letters (Thank-you and Congratulations) 1999-2004 [6 folders]

Box 11
Emeriti Luncheons 1991-2004 [5 folders]
Faculty Action Summaries 1985-91
Faculty Development 1994
Faculty Manual and Revisions 1987-1996
Faculty Mentoring Program 1991-1992
Faculty Orientation 1987-1992
Faculty Picnic 1988-1995
Faculty Status Reports 1993-2000 [4 folders]
Founder’s Day 1987-1996 [2 folders]
General Education Program at AU 1963-64
General Files (University Senate) Undated, 1946-1951, 1957, 1961, 1963-1972 [16 folders]

Box 12
General Files (continued) 1973-May 1986 [20 folders]

Box 13
General Files (continued) June 1986-1999 [21 folders]

Box 14
General Files (continued) 2000-2004 [13 folders]
Graduate Regulations 1960
Grants Supporting Research and Teaching 2001-2003
Historical Files 1964-1993
Honors Board 1967-71, 1987-1994 [2 folders]
Medals 1991-1997
Minutes See: Bound Volumes
Non-Tenure Track Appointments 1980-83
Office of Campus Life 2002-2003
Phi Beta Kappa Application 1967
Planning Council Minutes 1975-78
Program Changes 2000-2002, Accounting-Anthropology [3 folders]

Box 15
Program Changes (continued) 1964-2003, Anthropology-Software Process [41 folders]
Program Proposal, Graduate Certificate in Secondary Teaching 1998
Program Review 1985-1999 [3 folders]

  • General
  • American Studies-World Capitals Program
  • Anthropology-TESOL
  • Applied Sociology-Toxicology
  • Center of Excellence, Comparative Economic Policy and Institution
  • Graduate Studies, Masters Program Review
  • Masters Programs
  • Philosophy and Religion-Physics, General

Box 16
Proposed Budget Reductions 1994
Provost Communications Aug. 1987-2004 [11 folders]
Report of the Reconvened 75 th Anniversary Student Evaluation Committee 1969
Report for the University Senate by the Vice President of Development and Planning, 1988
Research Standards for Promotion and Tenure 1987
Retirement 1971-93
Retreat 1988-1990, 1993 [2 folders]
Sense of the Senate and Committee Resolutions 1991-1993
Sexual Harassment Project 1999
SIS International Relations Sub-Faculty 1965
Student Representation 1989-1993
Summary of Senate Actions 1989-1991
Task Forces:

  • APEL Program 1977
  • Field Experience 1989-1991
  • Future of CPIA 1987
  • Governance 2002
  • Smoking 1989-1992
  • Temporary Faculty Issues 1998-99
  • Washington Semester Program 1993

Tripartite Committee of Sixteen 1969 [2 folders]
University Mission Statement 1993-1994 [2 folders]
University Organizational Chart 1994
University Professor Requirements
University Senate Rules and Regulations 1962-68, 1975, 1985-1990, 1993 [3 folders]
Washington College of Law Faculty Committee 1964
Washington Research Library Consortium 1969-1996

Box 17
Faculty Senate Tape Recordings 2000-2004

01/19/00 Executive Committee
02/09/00 Executive Committee
04/19/00
04/26/00 Executive Committee
05/03/00
06/20/00 Executive Committee
08/23/00 Executive Committee
09/06/00
09/10/00
09/20/00
10/04/00
10/18/00
11/01/00
11/15/00
12/06/00
01/24/01
02/07/01 Budget Meeting
03/07/01
04/04/01
09/05/01
09/19/01
10/03/01
10/10/01 Executive Committee
10/17/01
11/07/01
11/14/01 Executive Committee
11/28/01 Executive Committee
12/05/01
12/12/01 Executive Committee
01/23/02
01/30/02 Executive Committee
02/06/02
02/20/02 Executive Committee
03/05/02
03/06/02 Open Meeting on Governance
04/03/02
04/17/02 Executive Committee
05/01/02
06/12/02 Executive Committee
10/16/02
11/13/02
12/04/02
01/22/03
02/12/03
04/02/03
04/16/03
05/07/03
09/03/03
09/10/03
09/24/03 Middle States Discussion
10/01/03
10/03/03
11/05/03
12/03/03
01/21/04
02/04/04
03/03/04
04/07/04
05/03/04
05/05/04
09/08/04
10/06/04
11/03/04
12/01/04

Box 18
American Senator 1979-2002 [11 folders]

Box 19
University Senate Meetings March 1993 - April 2000 [19 folders]

Box 20
University Senate Meetings September 2000 - May 2005 [7 folders]

About AU's Strategic Plan

Opened in Fall 2012, The Center for Diversity & Inclusion was created as a part of AU's 2008 Strategic Plan. Specifically, the Center works to achieve Transformational Goal #5, which states that "American University embraces diversity in its broadest sense, including diversity of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, nationality, disability, socioeconomic standing, and intellectual viewpoint. The university views diversity as an essential component of the educational experience of our students and an important indicator of our success in adapting to the dramatic demographic shifts that will occur in the decades ahead." Read the President's Council of Diversity & Inclusion.
 

How does the Center for Diversity & Inclusion define "diversity" and "inclusion?"

Currently, we use the definition that the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) created to describe diversity.

  • According to the AAC&U, diversity is defined as "individual differences (e.g., personality, learning styles, and life experiences) and group/social differences (e.g., race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, country of origin, and ability as well as cultural, political, religious, or other affiliations)."
  • The AAC&U defines inclusion as "the active, intentional, and ongoing engagement with diversity-in the curriculum, in the co-curriculum, and in communities (intellectual, social, cultural, geographical) with which individuals might connect-in ways that increase awareness, content knowledge, cognitive sophistication, and empathic understanding of the complex ways individuals interact within systems and institutions."

The Center for Diversity & Inclusion will initiate conversations and implement programming in the spirit of these definitions in order to promote a supportive environment where all students are celebrated and valued.

Marketing & Communications Staff


Kogod's Marketing and Communications Office is available to provide faculty and staff with promotional support and media. Contact us for news releases, event organization or graphics production.

Office Hours: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM, Monday - Friday

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is dedicated to preserving, presenting, and creating the art history of Washington, DC through our book collection, database, events, and exhibitions. The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is:

  • 5 new exhibitions submitted by Washington artists a year
  • 2,000 square feet of gallery space in the AU Museum
  • 60+ books on DC's art history

The Alper Initiative for Washington Art is made possible through a generous grant by American University alumna and art advocate Carolyn Alper.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Alon Milwicki

Fields:
Modern America, American Extremism, particularly right wing extremist groups, white supremacists, and Neo-Nazis
Faculty Advisor:
Allan Lichtman
Education:
BA history, Boston University; MA Seton Hall University
Research Interests:
Post WWII America, Extremist groups, Racism, and Hate Studies.
Email Address:
am1537a@student.american.edu

Kara Andrade

School of Communication
Year of Program Entry: 2014

Kara has more than ten years of experience working in the United States and Latin America as a bilingual journalist, entrepreneur and multimedia producer for a variety of leading media organizations including Al Jazeera America, Americas Quarterly, Associated Press, Christian Science Monitor, France 24, Global Post, The New York Times, and others. She consults as a trainer for the U.S. State Department's eDiplomacy Initiative, as well as for the U.S. Institute of Peace. She has presented in fifteen countries at conferences including the Ashoka Future Forum, Campus Party Mexico, Commonwealth Club of California, Fulbright Annual Conferences, Guatemala Scholars Network, more than ten U.S. State Department organized TechCamps, four consecutive South by Southwest (SXSW) panels, various PeaceTech Exchanges organized by the United States Institute of Peace, the World Social Science Forum, and many others.

Her research interests are in media, technology, entrepreneurship, digital storytelling, social movements and strategy, and Latin America.

Website: http://www.karaandrade.com/

2nd Annual 5K Race to Representation

Saturday, October 6, 2012

Over 300 people attended the Women & Politics Institute’s 2nd Annual 5K Race to Representation. Those that participated ran to support the institute’s efforts to close the gender gap in political leadership. Jennifer Lawless offered opening remarks and was among those who finished the race, along with several Institute staffers, students, and faculty members. Click here to see all the race photos.

WPI Graduation Festivities

Sunday, April 28, 2013

In a combined brunch event, the Women & Politics Institute celebrated this year's six Women, Policy, and Political Leadership Certificate recipients and twenty-nine WeLead Program graduates. The event also honored the 2012-2013 Alice Paul Award Winners: Ann Timmons (Faculty Recipient), Anita McBride (Alumna Recipient), Sarah Glassman (Staff Recipient), Jane Palmer (Graduate Student Recipient) and Emily Yu (Undergraduate Student Recipient). See photos of the festivities here.

Programs

  • International Peace and Conflict Resolution
  • Intercultural and International Communication
  • Global Media (formerly International Media)
  • JDMA (last names A-J)

Schedule with Jessica
 

Records Management

The University Archives selects, preserves, and provides access to the records of the University and related materials of enduring historical and administrative significance. The University Archives, located in Bender Library, is the official repository for all University records of lasting value once they are no longer needed for current use.

Shared Responsibility for Records

Records regardless of format, created in the course of business are the property of the University. AU offices and staff that create and maintain these records are responsible for their preservation and security while they are in active use, and are also responsible for consulting the records retention schedule and/or the University Archivist to determine when and how inactive records should be transferred to the University Archives or destroyed.

Value and Uses of Records

The records generated by the schools, departments, and offices of the University are the most tangible evidence of AU's history and activities. They provide University administration with the materials necessary to understand and interpret the evolution of University policies and functions. The records not only document the official duties of the university administration, schools, programs, centers, and departments, but also its relationships with alumni, student groups, and the city of Washington, DC.

Categories of Records

The selection and preservation of those records that support these historical and administrative pursuits is a complex undertaking as not all of the past and current records that American University produced are of permanent value. Some are of lasting significance; others are needed to provide legal and administrative evidence for recent University actions and obligations; still others are only of temporary value, primarily to the office that holds them.

Records Retention Schedule

American University's Records Retention Schedule is a guideline that sets forth the length of time records are recommended to be retained. It applies to records in the inactive phase of their life cycle. The inactive phase begins at the conclusion of an ongoing matter, such as completion of a contract or grant funded research. Unless otherwise specified, the retention period designated in the schedule starts at this point in time. Individuals with questions or concerns about the schedule are encouraged to meet with the University Archivist.

Digital or Electronic Records

Disposition of records created, retained, or stored in information systems or computers should proceed on the same basis as traditional records. Digital or electronic records for which there is no retention requirement should be deleted promptly. AU Records Retention and Disposal Policy re: disposal of electronic records.

Records Disposal

Records may not be destroyed unless permission is granted through an approved records schedule. Records pertaining to any investigation, legal action or proceeding, litigation, audit, or program review in progress should not be destroyed even if the retention period or disposition date specified for the records has expired.

Access to Records

Access to records remaining in the custody of academic units and offices is through a designated staff person. Access to records in the custody of the University Archives is in accordance with its policies and procedures. Some materials may be restricted for a designated period of time if there are privacy and/or confidentiality concerns.

DC Young Alumni

President: Ritanch Hans, SIS/BA '13; Kogod/MS '15
Executive Vice President: Thomas Florczak, CAS/BA '17
Vice President of Outreach and Engagement: Claire Moyer, Kogod/BA '13 
Vice President of University Relations: Rebecca Bock, SIS/BA '16

At-Large Members:
Tiffany Bach, SIS/BA '16
Amanda Baker, SIS/MA '15
Elliot Bell-Krasner, SPA/MPP '12
Jackie Breuer, SIS/BA '15
Tony Cohn, SOC/BA '15
Palak Gosar, SPA/BA '13
Aava Khajavi, CAS/BA '16
Danyal Sheikh, Kogod/BA/BS '17
Evie Unsworth, SPA/BA '16

Join the DC Young Alumni Chapter on Facebook

Aaron T. Bell, ABD

Fields
Diplomatic History, Russia, Japan
Dissertation
The US and Japanese Interventions in the Russian Far East Faculty
Advisors
Max Paul Friedman, Eric Lohr, Justin Jacobs
Education
BA in history and East Asian studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, MA in international relations, University of Chicago.
Research Interests
Connecting US Diplomatic history to the history of Russia and Japan, particularly in Northeast Asia, through transnational, borderlands, imperial, and international relations theory approaches.
Email
pb1169a@student.american.edu

Men Rule: The Continued Under-Representationof Women in U.S. Politics

Study after study finds that, when women run for office, they perform just as well as their male counterparts. No differences emerge in women and men's fundraising receipts, vote totals, or electoral success. Yet women remain severely under-represented in U.S. political institutions. We argue that the fundamental reason for women's under-representation is that they do not run for office. There is a substantial gender gap in political ambition; men tend to have it, and women don't.
Read the report here.



Comments & Suggestions

Your needs matter to us. We welcome your comments and suggestions. Call, stop by or write us at clear@american.edu. We look forward to seeing you at CLEAR!

Comments and Suggestions

Your needs matter to us. We welcome your comments and suggestions. Call, stop by or write us at clear@american.edu. We look forward to seeing you at CLEAR!

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Post-Election Panel Discussion


Thursday, November 6, 2014

CCPS, WPI, and the Kay Spiritual Life Center co-sponsored a post-election panel discussion. Moderated by James A. Thurber, the panel analyzed the 2014 midterm election results. The panel speakers were Anna Greenberg, Jennifer Lawless, Candice Nelson, and Molly O'Rourke.

Time: 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm 
Location: MGC 3 - 5

Prizes will be awarded for best tasting, most creative, and fan favorite cookies.

Bakers may only submit one entry. All bakers must be full or part-time staff members and must register by Friday, May 25, 2018. Review the official Cookie Bake-Off rules before signing up. For questions, contact Ashley Wallace.

AU Logo

Raina Lenney
Assistant Vice President of Alumni Relations
202-885-5936 | View Profile

John Little, ABD

Fields:
Disability History, Russian History, Modern European History, International Relations
Dissertation:
Disability in the Early Soviet Union
Faculty Advisor:
Eric Lohr
Education:
BA international studies and political science '99, University of Richmond; MA international relations '01, University of East Anglia
Research Interests:
My dissertation focuses on the concept of disability in the early Soviet Union. I examine the evolution of the structures associated with disability and the disabled population's acceptance or resistance to Soviet programs. More broadly, I study cultural and social issues, including disability, gender, race, and class. I continue to have a deep interest in diplomatic history, from 18th- and 19th-century Ottoman-Russian relations to the space race.
Email Address:
jl3245a@student.american.edu

University Center

Girls Just Wanna Not Run

Studies of women and men who are well-situated to run for office uncover a persistent gender gap in political ambition. Among "potential candidates" - lawyers, business leaders, educators, and political activists - women are less likely than men to express interest in a political career. Given the emergence over the past ten years of high-profile women in politics, such as Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi, Sarah Palin, and Michele Bachmann, though, the landscape of U.S. politics looks to be changing. Perhaps young women are now just as motivated as young men to enter the electoral arena. Maybe young women envision future candidacies at similar rates as their male counterparts. Until now, no research has provided an analysis - let alone an in-depth investigation - of these topics.
Read the report here.



Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Members

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Still have questions? Send us an email: GradComm@american.edu

Inclusion is the active, intentional, and ongoing engagement with diversity in the curriculum, co-curriculum, and communities (intellectual, social, cultural, geographical) with which individuals might connect.

Reporting Bias

For complaints against:

We are establishing an infrastructure to support, cultivate, and foster greater diversity and inclusion.

AU's population 1

Minority Freshmen
32 %
Undergraduates of color
31 %
Full-time faculty of color
18 %
  1. Data from 2016

Looking forward

To make a lasting impact, we must continue to uphold our core values.

Controller's Office Staff 

AU's Master of Arts in Teaching takes only five semesters to complete. The curriculum has been designed by education experts who understand that, while grounding in a theoretical framework is an important part of training teachers, it's hands-on experience in a real-life classroom setting that allows great future teachers to solidify their practical skills. For that reason, practical experience is an integral part of our program, whether you join us on campus or online.

Students choose one of two tracks: elementary (grades 1-6) or secondary (grades 7-12) education. All students start with foundational courses such as Theories of Educational Psychology and Human Development, and then go on to earn at least 39 credit hours in their chosen track.

See Admissions & Requirements.

When you enroll in American University’s Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program, you are taking a step toward helping to build a better society. We offer students access to cutting-edge research, innovative partnerships with educational organizations in Washington, DC, and an engaging, progressive curriculum—all to leave you equipped and eager to inspire the next generation of students to solve society’s biggest problems.

Our university’s strong political and social legacy means we’re well positioned to attract world-changing passion, encourage it, and help you channel it back into the world where it can make a difference. Our top-notch faculty consists of respected specialists and researchers who offer their graduate students innovative, evidence-based teaching techniques.

American University’s MAT program is CAEP-recognized and designed for individuals who have a bachelor’s degree and are interested in obtaining a teaching license in either elementary or secondary education (English and social studies).

Our faculty's distinguished careers include roles within the Department of Education, consulting assignments on the Obama administration’s Reach Higher Initiative, and many other prestigious and influential positions within the field of education. They are not only exemplary instructors but also thinkers, innovators, and researchers who are helping to shape the future of education. Whether you enroll in our online or on-campus format, you can look forward to developing important and lasting mentor relationships with the professors you'll meet here. 

See more about the Teacher Education Faculty.

Still have questions? Send us an email: teachered@american.edu

Education professor Dennis conferring with student after class.

In the Teacher Education Program you will:

  • Work with outstanding faculty known in the academic community for generating ground-breaking ideas for the improvement of education and instruction.
  • Take innovative, progressive classes in a small, individual-focused setting while be surrounded by students who share your interests in education and build a network of resources for your future.
  • Build a network of resources for your future in diverse field experiences in DC Public Schools and throughout the DC Metro Area.

Israeli Soldiers, Sudanese Refugees, and a Talmudic Debate

November 6, 2017
An Evening with Israeli Writer and Translator Haim Watzman

See More about November 6

Laura Blumenfeld and Samuel G. Freedman in Conversation

September 27, 2017

RSVP: Blumenfeld & Freedman

Controller's Office Staff 

Programs

  • PhD
  • Global Governance, Politics, & Security
  • International Economic Relations
  • International Economics

Schedule with Mike

 Department Profiles

Museum Theater, Spring 2010

Partner: Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center at the National Museum of American History
AU Public History students worked alongside the staff of the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation and the National Museum of American History to develop two original pieces of museum theater based on the lives of two groundbreaking female inventors, Margaret E. Knight and Marion O'Brien Donovan. With the help and guidance of faculty and actors from AU's own Performing Arts department, students wrote theatrical scripts based on original research into these inventors' lives.

Aria Ruggiero

Aria Ruggiero received her BA in Psychology from Boston University in 2014. She is a second year Master's student and is working on her thesis, which will examine how sleep disturbances prospectively predict daytime mood and behavioral deficits in adolescents. Current research interests include the bidirectional relationship between sleep processes and depression, anxiety, emotion regulation, and stress and coping. She is also interested in treatment outcomes for an array of psychological disorders; particularly, anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

Sue Wenze

After finishing coursework in the clinical psychology program at AU, under the mentorship of Dr. Kate Gunthert, Sue Wenze completed her predoctoral internship (2008-09) and a T32 postdoctoral research fellowship (2009-10, 2011-12) at Brown University Medical School in Providence, RI. She joined the faculty of Brown's Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior in 2012, and in 2014, she obtained a tenure-track faculty position in the Department of Psychology at Lafayette College in Easton, PA.

Maria Thestrup

Since graduating from AU, Maria Thestrup has worked at several university counseling centers including American University Counseling Center and George Washington Counseling Center. In addition, she also worked as a psychologist at the National Center for Weight and Wellness with patients struggling with obesity and a variety of disordered eating symptoms. She also served on the Board of the DC Psychological Association for several years and served as chair (and founder) of the Early Career Psychologist Committee of the DC Psychological Association. Maria currently maintains a private practice in Georgetown.

Cuba Democracy Assistance: USAID's Program Is Improved, but State Could Better Monitor Its Implementing Partners

(GAO Report, January 2013)

For this report, GAO identified current assistance, implementing partners, subpartners, and beneficiaries; reviewed USAID's and State's efforts to implement the program in accordance with U.S. laws and regulations and to address program risks; and examined USAID's and State's monitoring of the use of program funds.

Link to full text via GAO

U.S. Secretly Created 'Cuban Twitter' to Stir Unrest

BY DESMOND BUTLER, JACK GILLUM AND ALBERTO ARCE (ASSOCIATED PRESS BIG STORY, APRIL 4, 2014)

This article reveals that, in 2009, the U.S. Agency for International Development created a Cuban version of Twitter (dubbed ZunZuneo) with the goal of evading Cuban internet restrictions and undermining the communist government. Built with secret shell companies and financed through foreign banks in order to conceal the U.S. government's role, the project lasted for more than two years and drew tens of thousands of subscribers, who were unaware of the project's origins or objectives. A lack of funding led to the shutdown of the project in 2012.

Link to the full text via the Miami Herald

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Peace & Conflict Resolution

Global Governance & International Organizations

Entrance Semesters
Fall, spring, summer.
Application Deadlines
Merit Award consideration, February 1
Fall priority admissions, February 1; Rolling Admissions until August 1
Spring priority admissions, November 1; Rolling Admissions until December 1
Summer admission: Yes
Required Documents
Statement of Purpose
Transcripts
2 Letters of Recommendation
Resume
Praxis CORE scores (Passing scores are 156 for Reading, 162 for Writing, and 150 for Math)or an equivalency exam and the Praxis Writing. For more information on test requirements, please use this link for a list of Frequently Asked Questions.
*GRE scores are NOT required.*

Request Info  Apply: On-Campus Program  Apply : Online Program

Still have questions? Send us an email: communication@american.edu

Transcript of Dr. Kerwin's Remarks

On this joyous occasion, we would be remiss not to acknowledge the racist hate crime that has shaken our community, and the pain that all of us are feeling. Make no mistake: this was a hate crime directed at African American women, specifically members of Alpha Kappa Alpha, Incorporated, including AU's first African American female student government president. We will not stand for it. An attack on any of us is an attack on all of us.

Sadly, this was not the first racist act we've experienced this year. We are not immune to the hatred that has given rise to such acts on campuses across our nation. This crime was an assault on the values of our community and the American University that I have had the privilege to be a part of for more than 40 years. As president, it is my responsibility to foster an environment where every student feels safe, and is able to learn and thrive. I regret that my efforts to create such a climate have not been sufficient to prevent this and other acts.

I open this commencement with a statement of commitment: first, the leaders of this university and I will continue working with the United States Attorney's office, the FBI, and the Metropolitan Police Department, and will not rest until we identify those responsible and bring them to justice.

Second, we will work tirelessly to live up to our mission and values. We will seek ways to more effectively address these challenges: holding a mirror up to ourselves, rooting out sources of systemic racism, and looking beyond the way we've operated, with a bias towards action. In the past weeks, in public town halls and face-to-face meetings, we've begun to develop together a list of ideas and recommendations that represent concrete steps to effect change. I know President-designate Burwell joins me in this commitment.

As I look upon the faces of our future alumni and the faculty who helped you arrive at this moment, I see passion. I see resolve. I see leaders. We have an opportunity to create meaningful change on one of the most important issues facing American University, our nation, and our world. I am certain that together, we will rise to this challenge.

Frequently Asked Questions


Bradley Hardy   Associate Professor, School of Public Affairs

Areas of Expertise: Economy and taxes; labor economics; economic instability; poverty policy and socio-economic outcomes

Bradley Hardy is an associate professor in the School of Public Affairs. He is available to discuss issues related to poverty policy, labor economics, economic instability, intergenerational mobility, and socio-economic outcomes. He is nonresident senior fellow in Economic Studies at The Brookings Institution.

Cancelling for Spring 2019

Moving Off Campus

Continuing students currently assigned for the spring 2019 semester who decide to move off campus but continue to take spring courses will be charged for cancelling their spring 2019 housing assignment. Please review the basic cancellation fee and refund schedule below and the full schedule on the 2018-2019 Housing License Agreement to review the schedule of fees outlined in Section 10 and Appendix A:

On or before November 2
100% refund with $500 cancellation fee
November 3 - January 4
50% of total fall housing refund with no fee
On or after January 5
No refund with no fee

Study Abroad, Leave of Absence, Permanent Separation, Transfer, Part-Time, or Academic Dismissal

To have the cancellation fee waived, students must:

  • Submit the termination form by June 1, 2018 to avoid fall housing charges being added to their account.
  • Submit supporting documentation showing proof of your acceptance to another institution, leave of absence, part-time status, academic dismissal, or request for a separation from the University.
  • Our office must be able to confirm study abroad status through the AU Abroad office.

Disciplinary Dismissal

Students dismissed from housing or the University due to disciplinary reasons will be charged for the housing termination based on the below schedule:

On or before January 4
100% refund with no fee
January 4 - February 4
50% refund with no fee
February 5 - February 11
25% refund with no fee
On or after February 12
No refund with no fee

Israeli Soldiers, Sudanese Refugees, and a Talmudic Debate

November 6, 2017
An Evening with Israeli Writer and Translator Haim Watzman

See More about November 6

AU alum teaching in class

Designed for individuals with a bachelor's degree and interest in a teaching license, the MAT program

  • provides online and on-campus options, each requiring 5 semesters
  • offers 2 tracks: elementary or secondary education; see MAT Admissions & Requirements
  • does not require previous training or experience in education
  • offers Scholarships & Partnerships including City Year / AISGW, TEACH Grants, Ganek Family Mini-Grants
  • prepares graduates for direct entry into positions as classroom teacher, curriculum specialist, arts coordinator, adult educator, program head, and related careers

AU's Master of Arts in Teaching takes only five semesters to complete. The curriculum has been designed by education experts who understand that, while grounding in a theoretical framework is an important part of training teachers, it's hands-on experience in a real-life classroom setting that allows great future teachers to solidify their practical skills. For that reason, practical experience is an integral part of our program, whether you join us on campus or online.

Students choose one of two tracks: elementary (grades 1-6) or secondary (grades 7-12) education. All students start with foundational courses such as Theories of Educational Psychology and Human Development, and then go on to earn at least 39 credit hours in their chosen track.

See Admissions & Requirements.

From Left to Right: Hans Noel, Anna Greenberg, Jim Hobart, and Jennifer Lawless.

Pre-Election Panel: 2016 Presidential Election

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

The Women & Politics Institute and the Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies co-sponsored a pre-election panel discussion on the upcoming 2016 presidential election. The panelists included Jim Hobart, Anna Greenberg, and Hans Noel. The discussion was moderated by Jennifer Lawless.

Lauren Skalina

Lauren earned her B.A. from Northwestern University in 2006 and worked as a research assistance at the Center on the Continuum of Care in the Addictions at the Unversity of Pennsylvania prior to arriving at AU. Her master's thesis explored covariation of positive and negative emotions in daily life in relation to interpersonal relationships and depression outcomes. Her dissertation focused on the unique and interactive effects of sleep and depression on neurocognitive outcomes. She completed her clinical internship in the Neuropsychology Track of the VA Maryland Healthcare System and graduated from AU in 2015. She is now completing a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in clinical and research neuropsychology at the War-Related Illness and Injury Study Center at the Washington DC Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

AU alum teaching in class

Designed for individuals with a bachelor's degree and interest in a teaching license, the MAT program

  • provides online and on-campus options, each requiring 5 semesters
  • offers 2 tracks: elementary or secondary education; see MAT Admissions & Requirements
  • does not require previous training or experience in education
  • offers Scholarships & Partnerships including City Year / AISGW, TEACH Grants, Ganek Family Mini-Grants
  • prepares graduates for direct entry into positions as classroom teacher, curriculum specialist, arts coordinator, adult educator, program head, and related careers

Alanna Covington

Alanna is currently on Internship at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Washington, DC. She received her BA in Psychology from Georgetown University in 2009. She completed her MA in Psychology at American in 2013 and worked in the Traumatic Brain Injury Department at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center until joining the Clinical Psychology PhD program in 2014. Her dissertation explores instrumental emotion regulation and co-regulation in romantic couples. More broadly, her research interests also include dynamic relationships between daily processes and sleep, and their ability to predict long-term outcomes. 

AU Logo

Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

Marian Anderson, The Lincoln Memorial, and Constitution Hall, Spring 2014

Partner: National Park Service
What can we understand about race relations in World War II-era America from Marian Anderson's Lincoln Memorial concert and the surrounding controversy? The student team of Donelle Boose, Elise Fariello, and Brianne Roth created a web-based audio program exploring how Anderson's concert and the people behind it challenged American conventions about race and acted as an important precursor to the Civil Rights Movement.

Decatur House Servant Quarters, Spring 2014

Partner: White House Historical Association
The student team of Katlyn Burns and Lisa Fthenakis conducted primary source research, with special attention to architecture, maps, and images, to create a web exhibit exploring the empty spaces of the unfinished servant quarters at the back of Decatur House. Through their project, the team studied the daily realities of servant life among both enslaved and free people in 19th and 20th century Washington, DC.

Resurrection City, Spring 2014

Partner: National Park Service
For six weeks in 1968, as part of the Poor People's Campaign, the National Mall was home to Resurrection City. The student team of Joanna Capps, Kristen Horning, and Alex Knabe created an online exhibit examining the history of Resurrection City and its existence (or erasure) on the National Mall and in American memory.

Green Team Initiative

The AU Library is committed to the University's vision for an eco-conscious campus. Here are some ways we are working to further this goal and how you can help:

  • Go Green & Recycle E-Waste: Moving old computers and cell phones out of your life, and out of the waste stream.
  • Eco-Smart Library Tote Bags for Sale!: Help keep the waste-stream free of non-biodegradable plastic. Visit the Information Desk to purchase today!
  • Help the Library compost: More than half of the trash produced in the library can be composted and reused.
  • 100% recycled paper: All printing in the Library is on 100% post-consumer paper.

General FAQ

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Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

AU Logo

Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

AU Logo

Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

Featuring Artists

Darren Almond, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Jenny Gage, Mads Gamdrup, Anna Gaskell, Margi Geerlinks, Siobhán Hapaska, Mwangi Hutter, Justine Kurland, Jone Kvie, Clare Langan, Barbara Liotta, Malerie Marder, Ottonella Mocellin, Ernesto Neto, Anneè Olofsson, Gyan Panchal, Nira Pereg, Patricia Piccinini, Torbjørn Rødland, Jenny Rydhagen, Ann-Sofi Sidén, Katja Strunz, Janaina Tschäpe, Hellen van Meene, Tom Waldron.

A decoupage globe.

Jiří Kolář, Globe with Stamps, c. 1965. Collection of Museum Kampa, The Jan and Meda Mladek Collection, Prague.


Jordan Tama Associate Professor, School of International Service

Areas of Expertise: Congressional relations; Russia investigation; interest group and lobbying

Jordan Tama, assistant professor in the School of International Service, can comment on issues related to U.S. foreign policy, national security strategy, sanctions, Congress, the presidency, bipartisanship, independent commissions. He has published articles in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Foreign Affairs, among other media outlets, and has been interviewed by the BBC, CBS This Morning, National Public Radio, Fox News, and other news organizations.

Media and Publications

A man printed on a piece of fabric. The fabric is crumpled.

Jiří Kolář, Self-Portrait, 1971. Collection of Museum Kampa, The Jan and Meda Mladek Collection, Prague.

Standing at the foot of Australia’s sacred sandstone monolith known as Uluru, Michael B. Platt and Carol A. Beane envisioned a world invisible to many others. The world is at once primordial and imminent, spiritual and mortal. This exhibition is a collaborative offering from one of Washington’s most prolific pairs; an offering of visibility from one world into another. Inspired by the ancestral stories told by the indigenous keepers of Australia’s most sacred grounds, Platt and Beane fuse poetic image with word. The union culminates in an aesthetic experience of the human spirit that that transcends time, place, and identity.

Featuring the Poetry of Carol A. Beane


Writing wind-songs
my words find themselves
in undulations and ululations;
floating in stark abstractions
of light, traceries of shadow
moving among the grasses
and sand, over waves, and
in city spaces, conjuring memories;
deciphering voices
in the rocks and the red dirt;
waiting at the waterhole
to ensnare the longing,
palimpsests for other times of being.

sounds in the air in the vastness of
ancient spaces, disappearing,
unintelligible to the undiscerning ear,
though telling stories, upon stories,
upon stories, long through the night.

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Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

Dolores Tierney

Dolores Tierney is a Senior Lecturer in Film in the School of Media, Film and Music at Sussex University (UK). She has published widely on Latin(o/a) American media in various journals, has written a single-authored monograph, Emilio Fernandez: Pictures in the margins (Manchester University Press, 2007), and co-edited two anthologies, Latsploitation, Exploitation Cinema and Latin America (Routledge, 2009) and The Transnational Fantasies of Guillermo del Toro (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014). During her time as research fellow at the CLALS she completed a book-length study of Latin America's current transnational auteurs.

Maria Antonieta del Tedesco Lins

Maria Antonieta del Tedesco Lins is a Professor at the Institute of International Relations at the University of São Paulo. She holds a Master's degree in Public Administration and Government from the Getulio Vargas Foundation, a Master's in Gestion et Adminstration Publiques from the Universiteit Antwerpen, Belgium and a PhD in Business Economics from FGV-SP.

Her expertise is in monetary and financial economics, international finance and regional financial integration. Her research at CLALS focused on the implications of monetary, foreign exchange and captial account policies for regional financial integration in Argentina, Brazil and Mexico from 1990-2010. Another study compares the role played by public financial institutions in Brazil and India.

Cristina Carvalho Pacheco

Cristina Pacheco (PhD, UNICAMP, Brazil) is an Associate Professor at the State University of Paraiba, Brazil, located in the warm and beautiful city of João Pessoa, where she teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in international relations. Pacheco is a specialist in U.S. foreign relations, judicial politics, and international organizations. She is also a Researcher at INCT-INEU, a leading Brazilian institution dedicated to the study of the United States. She co-edits Revista de Estudos Internacionais (REI) , a Brazilian academic journal on international relations.

As a Fulbright Fellow at CLALS, Pacheco worked on a monograph on the U.S. Supreme Court's role in shaping foreign policy. The project focuses not only on landmark decisions on U.S. foreign policy made by the Court (Curtiss Wrigth Co., 1936; Korematsu, 1941; Youngstown Sheet and Tube, 1952; Goldwater, 1979; Rasul, 2004; Hamdi, 2006; and Boumediene, 2008, but also on less familiar cases that have also impacted U.S. foreign policy over the years. The main goal is to look at the Court as an important player in this field, while analyzing the ways in which the judicial system's influence on foreign policy are distinct from those of other branches of government.

Executive Coaching, black and white money symbol

Tuition
$3,500

Buddies hanging out together.
The AU students who participate in the program have returned from their semester or year abroad and know what it is like to visit another institution and complete coursework, internships, or travel in a different country. Many buddy pairs have remained friends for years and even traveled to visit one another across the globe after completing the program!

Affiliated Faculty

March 24
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March 25
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Research interests

  • International trade
  • Labor economics
  • Development economics

To complete the TEACH Grant Application, simply click on the image below.

 

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Cinquantenaire: A 90-acre park with the Triumphal Arch commemorating Belgian independence. Three museums are here: Royal Museum of Art and History, Autoworld, and the Military History Museum with an impressive collection of artifacts from every army that has ever been in Belgium.

Sablon: The Grand Sablon is a lovely square and center of an antique market on weekends. It's fun to browse the market or have coffee in one of the old craftsmen houses that surround the square. The Petit Sablon is an attractive park surrounded by 48 statues representing the different Medieval guilds.

Les Marolles: This area is the old working class quarter. The Palais de Justice (law courts) dominates the skyline. The Porte de Hal is the only part of the 14th century wall to remain standing.

District of Columbia War Memorial, Spring 2014

Partner: National Park Service
The student team of Julie Boser Rogers and Evan Phifer created an interpretive website for the District of Columbia War Memorial, which commemorates local men and women who died in service during World War I. Through documents, images, and audio, the website tells stories of the World War I experience in Washington, DC and of the monument's conceptualization and dedication, incorporating themes of individual sacrifice, community mobilization, and the contested national memory of the war.

John Ackerman

John Ackerman

John Ackerman is an Associate Professor at the Institute for Legal Research of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (IIJ-UNAM) and Vice President of the International Association of Administrative Law. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz and his B.A. in Philosophy from Swarthmore College. He is an expert in the topics of democratic transition, accountability, election law, state reform, public policy and citizen participation. Ackerman is Editor-in-Chief of the Mexican Law Review and a bi-weekly columnist for the newsweekly Proceso and the daily La Jornada.

Ackerman has been a Senior Consultant for the World Bank and was coordinator of the National Working Group on Transparency, Oversight and Accountability of the National Fiscal Convention in Mexico. He has also been a consultant with USAID, OECD, UNDP, Global Integrity, International Budget Project, Open Society Institute and in Mexico with the Secretary of the Public Function, the Supreme Court, the Chamber of Deputies and the Government of Mexico City. He has received funding for his research from the Fulbright Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the National Science Foundation and the University of California Institute on Mexico and the United States (UC MEXUS).

Students stand next to their poster and smile

Trendsetting Trivia: The Evolution of Advertising, Spring 2017

Partner: National Museum of American History
The student team of Ashleigh Aycock, Madeline Makhlouf, and Emily Sullivan developed a set of large flashcards for museum volunteers to use to educate visitors about the history of advertising and the museum's ad wall. Volunteers will use the flashcards to play a trivia game with visitors, asking questions and offering information about the history of advertising.

Students stand with their poster

St. Elizabeth's Wayside Sign Project, Spring 2017

Partner: National Building Museum
The student team of Ama Ansah, Elizabeth Gonzalez, and Ronald Teague created a set of wayside signs for St. Elizabeth's, the new home of Homeland Security. These wayside signs address such themes as treatment, architecture, people, and changes in practice, and they will be placed around St. Elizabeth's to offer information on previous uses for the buildings and on the institution's history.

  • Contact:
    hpc@american.edu
  • Mary Hansen (Chair)
    Professor, Economics
  • Assen Assenov
    Assistant Director, CTRL
  • Philip Johnson
    Professor, Physics
  • Betty Malloy
    Professor, Math & Statistics

Watch more Table Talks or Listen to our Podcasts on iTunesU

For more Table Talks and other events at Kay, visit our YouTube channel. For Table Talks from Fall 2014 and previous semesters, download a free podcast version on Kay's iTunesU page. You'll also find podcasts from our signature Human Rights Defender series and the annual Poynter lecture.

Laura Blumenfeld and Samuel G. Freedman in Conversation

September 27, 2017

RSVP: Blumenfeld & Freedman

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

American Enterprise Pre-Exhibition Website, 2010-2011

Partner: National Museum of American History
AU Public History students collaborated with curators at the National Museum of American History to build the Smithsonian's first pre-exhibition website for the museum's "American Enterprise" exhibition. Collaborating with staff from the museum's New Media office, the students launched their website in January of 2011, complete with a curator blog, visitor surveys, and a tour of objects featured in the upcoming exhibition.

Additional Required Courses

HIST 744: The Historian's Craft, required, offered every fall.

Two Colloquia from these four offerings:

  • HIST 720: Colloquium in Modern European History, 1789-1900.
  • HIST 721: Colloquium in Modern European History since 1900.
  • HIST 727: Colloquium in United States History I: to 1865.
  • HIST 728: Colloquium in United States History II: since 1865.

HIST 751: Graduate Research Seminar, offered every semester.

Capstone: a second Graduate Research Seminar or MA Thesis

Join us for AU's celebration of GIS Day with a talk given by Mikel Maron of Mapbox and the OpenStreetMap Foundation. 

OpenStreetMap has enabled nearly anyone to create and use geographic data to represent our world, and Mapbox has built on open source to bring beautiful interactive cartography to anyone’s hands. These tools have helped work towards solutions to our thorniest issues — like eliminating malaria and responding to disasters — sparking geographic collaborations between slum-dwellers and international organizations, students and governments. Let’s look at how open communities and tools function in detail, the problems they address, and how they critically rely on the guidance and participation of cartographers.

Mikel Maron leads the Community team at Mapbox, helping to grow the adoption of open geo data in humanitarian organizations, governments and education, and advancing work with OpenStreetMap. As Presidential Innovation Fellow at the US State Department Mikel drove OpenStreetMap adoption across federal agencies. He is co-founder of the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team, co-founder of Map Kibera and GroundTruth Initiative and Board member of the OpenStreetMap Foundation

This event is co-sponsored by the School of Communication, Environmental Studies, Metropolitan Policy Center, and Computer Science.

Light refreshments will be served.

The program provides a skills-focused curriculum that communicates rigorous academic education in theory, research, and economics taught by leading scholar-practitioners in international affairs.

Electives

While students can take any elective courses, the following courses fulfill the tool of research requirements.

HIST 467/667: Oral History, offered every fall.

HIST 477/677: History and New Media, offered every spring.

Schedule a one-one appointment with our Fidelity or TIAA consultants, regardless if you are in the early, mid, or late phase of your career. Consultants are on-site twice a month and you can discuss all aspects of financial planning.

Fidelity participants, call (800) 642-7131 or visit getguidance.fidelity.com.

TIAA participants, call (800) 732-8353 or visit www.tiaa.org/schedulenow.

Students adhering exhibit elements to wall

Sharing History at Dupont Underground, Spring 2018

Partner: Dupont Underground
In partnership with the nonprofit arts and cultural organization Dupont Underground, the student team of Kristin Herlihy, Callie Hopkins, Ally Laubscher, and Abigail Seaver worked to interpret the organization's history. They created a website, brochure, and onsite panel to share the history of Dupont Underground, located in the 1940s trolley tunnels under Dupont Circle, with the public.

Students standing with Mapping Whiteness poster

Mapping Whiteness in Late 1960s Washington, DC, Spring 2018

Partner: DC 1968
The student team of Asia Bostock, Hannah Byrne, Chloe Eastwood, and Rachel Hong worked alongside Dr. Marya McQuirter to look at the public memory of DC in 1968. Using Washingtonian magazine as a source, the team studied the presence, practice, and projection of whiteness in Washington, DC during the late 1960s and created a website to share their project with the public.

Susana SaldarriagaSusana Saldarriaga is a fifth-year student studying philosophy in the Department of Philosophy and Religion’s BA/MA program. She is interested in social work and community engagement and works at Horton’s Kids as a case manager. Susana is excited to help facilitate difficult conversations in a way that allows students to learn and understand other points of view.

The Menokin Foundation, Spring 2012

Partner: The Menokin Foundation
AU Public History students took on the task of interpreting the ruin of Menokin, the home of Francis Lightfoot Lee, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and its surrounding landscape. Highlighting the site's social and environmental history, the students produced a prospectus to serve as a guide for the Foundation's future interpretive work, with an emphasis on the incorporation of new media, as well as three wayside signs for the site.

Greening America's Cities, Spring 2012

Partner: Smithsonian Gardens
Students worked to develop the framework for "Greening America's Cities: A Timeline of Community Gardens," an interactive, user-driven, educational website about America's history of urban community gardening, highlighting the role of community gardens in alleviating socioeconomic challenges. The group developed the website's thematic structure, produced interpretive content, and gathered photographs and videos from community gardens across the country to seed the site.

Medical Plan Options

.

Rotating Courses

These courses are offered based on interest and need.

HIST 500: Memory and History.


HIST 670: Material and Visual Culture, offered alternating springs.

HIST 668: Historic Site Management, offered alternating springs.

HIST 688: Audience Evaluation for Public Historians, offered in the summer.

HIST 688: Collections Management, offered in the summer.

VOLUME: 1.5 linear feet

ACCESS: This collection is open to the public upon request.

COPYRIGHT: Please consult the archivist for information about duplication or publishing of any materials from this collection.

Biographical Note

A graduate of City College of New York with a BS degree, Dr. Joseph Blum received his masters and doctorate degrees from George Washington University. In 1950, Blum joined the United States Defense Department, National Security Agency, after holding posts at the Department of the Interior, Department of Army, and National Bureau of Standards. In his capacity at the NSA, he helped develop that institution’s computer systems.

Blum retired from the NSA in 1975, and became a computer science professor for American University for 12 years, retiring from the University in 1987. He continued to teach, taking a position for a year in an Armed Forces educational program in Germany. He also taught a variety of courses with the American University’s Institute for Learning in Retirement.

He died on April 10, 2002. He was 83 years old.

Scope and Content Note

The Joseph Blum papers document aspects of Blum’s teaching career, particularly at American University, as well as some biographical information. The papers primarily focus on course documents, particularly those courses taught for the Institute for Learning in Retirement, as well as writings in the form of book chapters, articles and general mathematical notes. Blum’s work with the Mathematical Sciences Speaker Program from 1963-1968, and the United Seniors Health Cooperative from 1990-1993, are also included.

The collection contains biographical material in the form of a curriculum vitae and memos of contributions (1975-1987) and American University annual reports and contributions (1975-1982); course materials in the form of chapter notes and handouts (1983; 1996-1999); general mathematical notes; documents relating to his work with the Mathematical Sciences Speaker Program (1963-1968) and the United Seniors Health Cooperative (1990-1993); and writings in the form of lectures and book chapters (1973-2001). One Eva-Tone recording is found in the United Seniors Health Cooperative file.

Processing Note

The Joseph Blum papers were arranged alphabetically according to subject and/or document type. The files were sorted into the following groups: American University, biographical information, course documents, projects, and writings. Original file labels were maintained for coherence. All staples, paper clips, and bindings were removed. Newspaper clippings were photocopied and the originals discarded.

Box & Folder Listing

Box 1

  • American University
    • Annual Reports, 1975-1982 - See also: Biographical-Curriculum Vitae
    • Contributions to AU, 1975-1980
  • Biographical
    • Contributions to Community, 1975-1981
    • Curriculum Vitae, 1977-1987
  • Courses
    • Institute for Learning in Retirement
      • Arithmetic Algebra, 1999
      • Astronomy, 1999
      • Geology, Fall 1998
      • Highlights from the History of Mathematics, Spring 1999
      • Mathematical Excursions, 1999
      • Statistics, Spring 1996
    • Microcomputer Architecture, 1983 (2 folders)
    • Physics, N.D.
    • UMD Course in Ramstein, GE, 1987
  • [Mathematical Notes] General
  • Mathematical Sciences Speaker Program, 1963-1968
  • United Seniors Health Cooperative, 1990-1993
  • Writings
    • All the Numbers, 2001-2005
    • Applications of the Optical Fourier Transform to the Analysis of Congruential Number Generators, 1975
    • Correlation by Power Spectrum Techniques with an Application to a Problem in Signal Analysis, Turpin and Blum, November 1973
    • Notes on Combinations: Theory and Applications, 1986
    • Notes on Concepts of Modern Physics, 1987
    • Secrets of Numbers
      • Chapter 1
      • Chapter 2
      • Chapter 3
      • Chapter 4

literature

Richard C. Sha will publish Imagination and Science in Romanticism (John Hopkins University Press, forthcoming in 2018).

Affiliate Faculty

C&O Canal National HistorICAL Park, Spring 2012

Partner: National Park Service
AU Public History students overhauled the self-guided interpretive resources in the C&O Canal National Historical Park's Lockhouse 6. The AU team developed a scrapbook, selected wall photos from the NPS archives, wrote labels to supplement the photos, and produced audio clips from oral histories to tell the story of the "Development of a Sanctuary: From Canal to National Park."

Faculty can support Intergroup Dialogue by:  

  • Promoting participant and facilitator applications to your students.
  • Offering course credit for your students’ participation in Intergroup Dialogue.
  • Serving as an Intergroup Dialogue faculty advisor. Advisors meet with facilitators weekly (electronically and/or in-person) during the seven-week program to help them process and plan their sessions.
Email dialogue@american.edu to be added to the Intergroup Dialogue faculty supporter list to receive information about any of the above.

Sirjaut Kaur Dhariwal

Sirjaut is producing a short documentary on the depleting water resources in Punjab, India, where the farmers are struggling to maintain the ecosystem that once was. Covering only a small fraction of the country's land, Punjab provides India with majority of their wheat and rice. This film will delve deep into historical eco-friendly farming practices and explore options for future water conservation.

Miracle SmithMiracle Smith is a junior majoring in Justice and Law with a concentration in criminal justice and minoring in African American and African Diaspora Studies. She is a member of the AU Gospel Choir and AU Ambassadors. Miracle teaches at an alternative school for young adults working toward their GED and teaches girls health to middle and high school students. She is looking forward to bringing a fresh voice and innovative ideas to tough conversations and interactions on campus.

Felicia HernandezFelicia Hernandez is a sophomore studying Political Science in the School of Public Affairs. She is an SPA Ambassador and a member of the SPA Leadership program, where her research focus is on environmental sustainability. Felicia is a member of Alpha Xi Delta, where she serves as the Director of Alumnae Relations.

Isabella DominiqueIsabella Dominique is a junior double-majoring in Interdisciplinary Studies: Communications, Legal Institutions, Economics, and Government (CLEG) and Political Science and minoring in International Studies. She serves as the vice president of AU’s NAACP chapter and the president of AU’s Pre-Law Society. Isabella first worked with the Project on Civil Discourse during 2017-18 as a Program Development and Research Fellow. She is excited to continue to build the program with the team and is eager to have important conversations about civil discourse with students.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

GRANTS AND RESEARCH

Vladimir Airapetian (physics) received $318,027 ($106,138 total in incremental funding through 8/13/20) from NASA for his project "Prebiotic Chemistry of the Young Earth and Mars From Theoretical and Experimental Studies."

Nicole Caporino (psychology) received $50,000 from the Anna-Maria & Stephen Kellen Foundation Inc. for her project "Web-based Training in the Assessment and Treatment of Pediatric OCD."

Douglas Fox (chemistry) received $109,337 (previously awarded amount $104,675 - total award now $ 214,012) from the US Endowment for Forestry and Communities for his project "Fluorescent Cellulose Nanomaterial Development Project."

David Haaga (psychology) received $85,326 from the TLC Foundation for his project "Randomized Controlled Trail of the Comprehensive Behavioral (COMB) Model of Treatment for Trichotillomania."

Daniel Kerr (history) received $225,000 from the Henry Luce Foundation for his project “Kerr Luce Humanities Truck.”

Jessica Leight (economics) received $788,858.98 from the US Department of Labor for her project "The impact of mentoring and life skills training on secondary progression and child labor among girls: a randomized controlled trail in Rajasthan."

Ethan Mereish (health studies) received $169,287 from NIH - NIAAA for his project "Minority Stress Reactivity and Hazardous Drinking."

Laura Owen (education) received $9,999 from the DC Public Schools for her project "DC Public Schools College Institute."

Kathryn Walters-Conte (director, Professional Sciences Masters in Biotechnology) received $49,270 from NSF for her project "Type I: Tenleytown I-Corps Site for Science."

Three people hold the

Three Stars, Two Bars, One City, Spring 2015

Partner: Historical Society of Washington, D.C.
The student team of Zach Klitzman and Sydney Johnson researched and wrote a school program for 12th graders answering the question: “Who’s a Washingtonian?” The program introduced students to the history of DC using archival and three-dimensional objects in the Society’s collections, and incorporated multimedia elements, such as this introduction video.

A woman writes on a white board at the performance presentation

How do You Fix a Broken Heart?, Spring 2015

Partner: National Museum of American History
The student team of Chelsea Hansen and Katherine Kitterman researched and scripted a public program exploring the history of innovation through artificial hearts. Their program debuted at the NMAH on July 1, 2015 as part of the Wallace Coulter performance stage, and the presentation was publicized in a Smithsonian Magazine article on the museum's collection of artificial hearts,

Business of Beauty, Spring 2015

Partner: National Museum of American History
The student team of Jen Giambrone, Catherine Schultz, and Alison Jobe photographed around 100 objects and conducted research to create a website exploring the history of the cosmetics business.

Three children hold their hands out, holding cards from their student historian kits

Student Historian Kits: Transportation Station, Spring 2016

Partner: Historical Society of Washington, D.C.
The student team of Joan Cummins, Samantha Hunter, Matt Wong, and Rebecca Quam created educational programming, in accordance with DC Public Schools' standards for third grade social studies and geography, for the Historical Society. The program uses the Historical Society's collections to illuminate the history of the streetcar in Washington, DC and to teach students how to examine primary sources, exercise historical thinking, and explore how their own choices can shape their city's history.

Marcus Rocha

Marcus Rocha is a Ph.D. Candidate in Public Policy at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil). He holds a Masters degree in Political Science from the same university. His dissertation research explores the internal controls in the Brazilian executive branch and the control of corruption in Brazilian municipalities. His research interests include institutions, federalism, public planning, control of corruption, and research methods. Marcus is also the current Chair of the Students Section of Latin American Studies Association.

AU Memo Letterhead

Memorandum April 23, 2018

To:
AU Community
From:
Sylvia M. Burwell, President
Subject:
Provost Search

In early March, we announced that, after ten years of leadership and service to American University, Provost Scott Bass would step down from the role of provost and transition to his faculty appointment in the School of Public Affairs. I'm writing you today with an update on our progress toward naming his successor.

Today, I am excited to mark three new steps in our search—all of which you can also find on our website.

First, we have laid out a timeline for this search. Our Search Committee, identified below, will meet regularly beginning in May, as we also convene campus stakeholders for input. We plan to conduct candidate interviews in the fall semester. Input from the AU community is essential to finding the right leader for this position, so we will provide several opportunities for input, including an open forum with staff (Tuesday, May 1, from 3 to 4 p.m. in Constitution Hall, Rooms 2-3) and a meeting with the Faculty Senate on May 2, with additional campus stakeholder consultations in September. We will be sure to notify the campus as additional opportunities arise, and in the meantime, you are welcome to send your thoughts and input to auprovost@spencerstuart.com.

Second, we have identified our Search Committee, made up of stakeholders from across the community who represent department leadership, faculty, staff, and students.

  • Christine Chin,Interim Dean, School of International Service (Co-Chair)
  • Jeff Rutenbeck, Dean, School of Communication (Co-Chair)
  • Sharon Alston, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Enrollment
  • Fanta Aw, Vice President of Campus Life and Inclusive Excellence
  • Sarah Irvine Belson, Associate Professor, School of Education; Executive Director, Institute for Innovation in Education    
  • Wendy Boland, Associate Professor, Department of Marketing; Associate Dean for Programs & Learning, Kogod School of Business
  • Terry Davidson, Professor, Department of Psychology; Director of the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Angela J. Davis, Professor of Law
  • Maria De Jesus, Associate Professor, School of International Service; Associate Director of Teaching & Learning, The Center for Teaching, Research & Learning
  • Laura DeNardis, Professor, School of Communication
  • Marie Fritz, Professorial Lecturer; Assistant Dean of Faculty Affairs, School of Professional & Extended Studies
  • Seth Grossman, Chief of Staff and Counselor to the President
  • Olivia Ivey, Assistant Librarian
  • Doug Kudravetz, Chief Financial Officer, Vice President and Treasurer
  • Pamela Nadell, Patrick Clendenen Chair in Women's and Gender History; Director of the Jewish Studies Program
  • Andrea Pearson, Associate Professor of Art History; Faculty Senate Chair
  • E. Andrew Taylor, Associate Professor, Department of Performing Arts; Chair of the Department of Performing Arts
  • James Thurber, University Distinguished Professor, Department of Government; Founder and Former Director of the Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies
  • Chris White, Student, JD/MBA program

Finally, we have enlisted the help of Spencer Stuart, one of the world's top executive search consulting firms. They have conducted presidential searches for Brown University, Colgate University, Cornell University, Northwestern University, Wesleyan University, and Yale University. They have also recently helped find the President for the New York Public Library, the President of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, and the Executive Director of TEDx. They were instrumental in our own presidential search here at American University, and I know they will provide valuable insight, guidance, and support through this process.

Identifying our next provost is an important step in charting the future we want to build at American University. I am so thankful for those who have volunteered to help in that search, and I look forward to working alongside everyone in the AU community as we make this important decision together.


Ana Isabel Rodríguez Iglesias

Ana Isabel Rodríguez Iglesias is a Ph.D. candidate in International Politics and Conflict Studies at the University of Coimbra (Portugal). Her dissertation examines the power-resistance dynamics surrounding the struggle for peace in the recent peace negotiations in Colombia. She holds three M.A. degrees, including in Latin American Studies from Georgetown University (2014), in International Relations (2010), and in Studies of the European Union (2012), both from the Universidad CEU San Pablo in Madrid. She has been awarded the FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia) Scholarship from the Government of Portugal to complete her Ph.D., and also received a Fulbright Scholarship for her work at Georgetown University. In 2016, she was awarded the Curriculum Fellowship Awardee for teaching a seminar on Civil Resistance at the University of Coimbra by the International Center on Non-violent Conflict.

During her studies and before pursuing her Ph.D., she worked as a researcher and consultant at various international organizations, think tanks, and universities, including the Inter-American Development Bank, Human Rights Watch, CSIS, and the Institute of European Studies of the University CEU San Pablo.

Three students stand with their practicum poster

Community Documentation Initiative Blog, Spring 2016

Partner: Anacostia Community Museum
The student team of Meg Biser, Rebecca Brenner, and Phoebe Sherman collaborated to write 12 blog posts for the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum's Community Documentation Initiative blog. The blog posts drew upon research in newspapers, photographs, and secondary literature in order to document the history of neighborhood change in DC's Latinx community.

Cleveland Park Practicum Group

Building Cleveland Park, Spring 2018

Partner: Cleveland Park Historical Society
In consultation with Carin Ruff, director of the Historical Society, the student team of Colleen Cheslak, Dave Kramer, Ashley Latta, and Kevin Lukacs produced videos about the Cleveland Park neighborhood's unique architectural history. The Society now features their videos online.

The Spirits that Linger: Haunted History in Lafayette Square, Spring 2014

Partner: White House Historical Association
The student team of Maria R. Eipert and Amanda Zimmerman researched the origins of the ghost stories and folkloric tales that surround Decatur House, the White House, and the President's Neighborhood and created a walking tour to engage visitors in a dialogue about the history behind these stories. Additionally, they wrote short biographies on the locations and people key to these ghost stories and designed wireframes to be used in a self-guided walking tour app.

Liam CarbuttLiam Carbutt is a first-year graduate student studying philosophy and social policy in the Department of Philosophy & Religion’s BA/MA program. He works for the department as a coordinator for the Ethics Bowl and spends his spare time playing ultimate and drawing. Liam is looking forward to holding conversations about controversial topics and writing for the Project’s Real Talk blog.

Peer Facilitators

Because of limited seating in Bender Arena, tickets will be required for admittance to the College of Arts and Sciences commencement ceremony and the School of International Service commencement ceremony. An allotment of six (6) tickets will be distributed to SIS and CAS students who have rented regalia and registered to participate in the ceremony.

Guest tickets are not required for the Spring Commencement ceremonies for the School of Public Affairs, School of Communication, and the Kogod School of Business. However, students participating in these ceremonies are asked to limit their guests to no more than seven (7).

Tickets will be required for admittance to the Fall Commencement ceremony. An allotment of five (5) tickets will be distributed to each student who has rented regalia and registered to participate in the ceremony.

AU Memo Letterhead

Memorandum May 1, 2017

To:
AU Community
From:
Neil Kerwin, President
Subject:
Racial Incident

The crude and racially insensitive act of bigotry reported this morning is under investigation by AU Campus Police with assistance from the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) and other AU offices and senior officials.

We strongly condemn what happened; will do all that we can to find those responsible; and ask that anyone who may know of those involved to please step forward and contact Public Safety at 202-885-2527 or the AUPD Tips Site.

We will alert the university community of the investigation's findings and next steps and will respond as swiftly and strongly as possible.

Racially charged acts of bigotry are done to instill fear and inflict pain in our community-especially at stressful times, such as at the end of the term.

I regret this happened, apologize to everyone offended, and state emphatically that this incident does not reflect what American University truly is. While this incident targeted AU's chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, and occurred after the first black woman and AKA member was sworn in as the Student Government president-our entire university community has been adversely affected by this cowardly, despicable act.

There will be a campus community meeting on Tuesday, May 2 to discuss the incident at 12 noon in Kay Chapel. Members of the President's Council on Diversity and Inclusion (PCDI) will be in attendance. PCDI will also host one-on-one drop in conversations at 6 p.m. at a table in McDowell Hall-as part of the PCDI Listens series.

Know that American University remains committed to principles of diversity, inclusion, common courtesy, and human dignity, and acts of bigotry only strengthen our resolve. Anyone who does not feel similarly does not belong here.

Some SIS programs have different or additional requirements to the general requirements listed above. Please select your program of interest below to view specific application procedures:

Travel Timeline

The Program will begin on March 10, at the meeting point of the group flight departure (either Miami or another city). Kogod will organize the group flight to and from Cuba, and all program participants will be required to take this flight. The program will conclude on March 19.

Itinerary and Housing

The group will depart for Havana, Cuba on Saturday, March 10.

While in Havana, students and staff will be staying in a Residencia. Breakfast and dinner will be provided. Previous Cuba company visits have included a tour of a local cigar factory, a visit to an agricultural cooperative/agribusiness micro-industry project, a meeting with officials from the Center to Promote External Trade and Foreign Investments from the Ministry of External Trade and Foreign Investment (MINCEX), and a visit a Veradero resort. While in Havana, the group will also have guest lectures from local experts and experience cultural events such as a Tropicana cabaret show or a local jazz concert.

Students will return to Washington, D.C. on Sunday, March 18.

REMINDER: All visits and activities are tentative and subject to change.

Credit Hours and Eligibility

This program is a 2-credit fall course (IBUS-244-001) and standard AU tuition applies. A 3-credit section of the course is also available (IBUS-244-002).

AU's Master of Arts in Teaching takes only five semesters to complete. The curriculum has been designed by education experts who understand that, while grounding in a theoretical framework is an important part of training teachers, it's hands-on experience in a real-life classroom setting that allows great future teachers to solidify their practical skills. For that reason, practical experience is an integral part of our program, whether you join us on campus or online.

Students choose one of two tracks: elementary (grades 1-6) or secondary (grades 7-12) education. All students start with foundational courses such as Theories of Educational Psychology and Human Development, and then go on to earn at least 39 credit hours in their chosen track.

See Admissions & Requirements.

The Lavender Lab is directed by Dr. Ethan Mereish. The Lavender Lab seeks to produce and disseminate knowledge to better understand and reduce sexual orientation, gender, and racial/ethnic disparities in health. The lab conducts NIH-funded research on the psychological, social, and cultural determinants of health for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals and racial/ethnic minorities.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Actions Taken Against Students Involved in Misconduct by an Underground Group Known as EI

August 28, 2017

American University has determined that 19 students have violated the Student Conduct Code related to their involvement with Epsilon Iota (EI). EI is an underground student group that has engaged in a pattern of Student Conduct Code violations. The misconduct findings range from physical violence, hazing, and underage drinking, to providing assistance to and perpetuating the activities of an unrecognized group engaged in prohibited conduct.

The sanctions imposed in these cases included 18 dismissals and one disciplinary probation.

"This group has perpetuated and systematically presented a threat to the safety and well-being of our students," said Fanta Aw, American University Interim Vice President of Campus Life. "This should send a strong message to anyone involved with groups engaged in activities prohibited by the Conduct Code.

AU does not comment on individual student cases. Disciplinary records of individual students are considered confidential under federal student privacy laws. The disciplinary process followed by the university may be found at in the Student Conduct Code.

Background on Epsilon Iota

Several times in the fall of 2000, the national fraternity Alpha Tau Omega (ATΩ) suspended its Epsilon Iota Chapter at American University, due to violations of alcohol and hazing rules. AU conduct charges also were filed against the group at that time.

The chapter voluntarily surrendered its charter to the national fraternity in lieu of ATΩ headquarters' action to revoke their charter. AU formally withdrew recognition of ATΩ as a fraternity on February 7, 2001.

In 2002, former ATΩ members created Epsilon Iota. The university does not recognize EI as a legitimate student group. Despite not being recognized or authorized, EI continued to operate and engage in serious misconduct.

From 2004 onward, members of EI were implicated in incidents of disorderly conduct, including loud parties, public urination, trash/littering, near campus.

In recent years, the university received reports that EI members were engaging in alleged illegal behaviors such as assault, sexual assault, rape, underage drinking and illicit drug use, occurring primarily off-campus.

As a result, AU increased scrutiny of EI and proactively attempted to identify perpetrators and stop activity that was criminal and/or violated the Student Conduct Code.

Since 2002, American University regularly warns students about EI's activities and parties where prohibited conduct may occur and discourages them from participating. These warnings include the following:

  • During Eagle Summit, AU's summer orientation program, incoming students are warned about EI and underground groups that engage in prohibited conduct.
  • Before Welcome Week, the Vice President of Campus Life or Dean of Students sends a memo to all new undergraduate students and a letter to their parents warning them about off-campus parties and underground groups.
  • During Eagle Summit and Welcome Week, incoming students are warned specifically about EI as part of the sexual assault awareness program.
  • Resident Assistants discuss the dangers of underground groups that engage in prohibited conduct during mandatory floor meetings in first-year communities.
  • More recently, in April 2017, AU's Dean of Students warned all undergraduate students of an off-campus party advertised by the underground group EI.

Since 2010, the university has charged 67 students affiliated with Epsilon Iota with violations of our Student Conduct Code. Many of these investigations led to sanctions up to and including dismissal from the university. The university has referred allegations of criminal conduct to law enforcement.

In summer 2016, AU amended its Student Conduct Code to add as prohibited conduct: "providing assistance to or in any way perpetuating the activities of an Underground Group that violates the Code and/or other university policies." (Student Conduct Code, section VI, GG)

Exam Readings

Dance students on Connections fall 2017 cover.

Contact Connections

Connections, the official magazine of American University's College of Arts and Sciences, provides a look into recent developments in the departments and programs, faculty and student highlights, and new directions for the college.

If you would like to receive a paper copy of Connections or suggest a story, please e-mail casnews@american.edu

IV. WHAT DO WE DO?

So what do we do about all of this? In seeking to craft a response, it is helpful first to have a vision. And there are few visions more powerful than that of the prophet Micah:

Micah 4:1-4 • In days to come the mountain of the LORD'S house shall be established as the highest of the mountains, and shall be raised up above the hills. Peoples shall stream to it, and many nations shall come and say: "Come, let us go up to the mountain of the LORD, to the house of the God of Jacob; that he may teach us his ways and that we may walk in his paths." For out of Zion shall go forth instruction, and the word of the LORD from Jerusalem. He shall judge between many peoples, and shall arbitrate between strong nations far away; they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more; but they shall all sit under their own vines and under their own fig trees, and no one shall make them afraid; for the mouth of the LORD of hosts has spoken.

What does it mean to beat a sword into plowshares? What are the "swords" that we're supposed to be transforming from instruments of violence into instruments of peace?

A. What the sword is

1. The gun

The most obvious answers is, of course, the gun. In the 1996 film Romeo & Juliet, they thought as much. In that film, which used Shakespeare's original words but set the action in a modern-day setting, all of the guns were referred to as "sword."

And indeed, guns are usually what people think of when thinking of instruments of violence. Soon, thousands will gather in this city to call for more meaningful regulation of precisely those instruments of violence.

2. But also not the gun: the alienation

It is absolutely true that guns make violence more catastrophic. And the more powerful the gun, the more powerful the catastrophe. And so it is not unreasonable to ask what can be done about guns and the easy access to firearms that makes such tragedies so common in this country.

But focusing on guns alone would prevent us from looking at deeper problems. At deeper issues that people of faith should care about.

B. Whence the Violence?

In his 2003 film Bowling for Columbine, Michael Moore set out to explore why it was that gun violence was so high in the United States. He looked seriously at the question of whether it was the presence of firearms alone.

In statistics that today are similar to the results Moore found in 2003, there are 112 guns per every 100 residents in the US. In Canada, there are only 30.8 guns per every 100 residents. A nearly 4-1 difference. But the U.S. sees 3.5 firearm related homicides per 100,000 people versus Canada's 0.5 firearm-related homicides per 100,000. That's a 7-1 difference. That cannot be accounted for by the number of guns alone. Something else must be at work.

Is it that we're more violent than other peoples? That is certainly a fair question to ask in a nation founded on settler-colonialism, genocide of indigenous peoples, and captive slavery of Africans. But it would be hard to say that we were more violent than, say, the Germans or the English or the French, all of whom have firearm related deaths 14 to 35 times lower than we do.

In talking to some Canadians, Moore encountered a common refrain they had about the US after having watched a fair amount of American television: "It seems you all are really scared down there. What are you so scared of?"

That's a really good question. There is no doubt that we Americans are a scared lot. Fear is used to sell foreign policy: fear of terrorism. Fear is used to sell domestic policy: fear of immigrants, fear of racial minorities, fear of economic instability, fear of change. Fear is used to get you to tune in to the evening newscast: "An everyday product probably in your house right now can kill you! Find out which one at 11!" Fear is used to sell products: we are told to fear receding hairlines and off-white teeth. Fear pervades our national life.

And fear is a powerful motivator to violent action.

It has been pointed out that states tend to revert to violent oppression when they fear that their power slipping away. It's not when they are powerful that they use violence to effect their will-in some ways, true power is in not having to use violence-it's when they feel they are losing power. (Again, just look at who the perpetrators of most of our gun violence are and you'll find disaffected white men, who are feeling powerless.)

And when we're afraid, we want control. When we're feeling powerless, we want power.

C. The Nature of the Gun

And nothing gives us that feeling of control, that feeling of power, like a gun.

There is something particular about the gun: it is powerful, it is immediate. In the martial arts, by the time you get to the point where you could kill a person with your bare hands, you don't. You've undergone so much discipline and training that the awesome power you now wield is grounded in that very discipline and training. But a gun requires no such discipline-it is immediate, it is powerful, it is deadly.

If we are to truly vanquish violence, especially gun violence, we have to do something about the underlying causes of violence, as well.

Our task must be to build communities in which no one is alienated, no one is feeling disaffected.

D. A new way

Right now, our world is undergoing great transformation. And change causes fear and anxiety-and with the high level of unprecendented change taking place culturally, scientifically, and socially, there's a lot of fear and anxiety out there.

But our two main responses to that change is: (1) say that change is terrible and promise people that we can go back in time and undo all the changes; or (2) say that change is inevitable and tell people to get over it.

But nowhere is there anyone who is acknowledging that change is frightening, but also offering a vision of a shared future. It must be terrifying to lose the family farm after generations because of industrial agriculture and not have any sense of how you'll fit into the future economy. That should be affirmed. But is not our task to provide a vision of how we can all move forward together and will take care of one another?

There are a lot of my white brothers and sisters who are terrified at the prospect of losing their privilege (a privilege most of them deny they have in the first place, paradoxically). Is not our task to provide a vision of how a diverse and inclusive world is a world that benefits everyone?

Beating the swords of gun violence into plowshares of prosperity won't be as effective if we cannot simultaneously turn the spears of fear, alienation, and anxiety into the pruning hooks of well-being for the whole community.

V. END

There was a meme that circulated for a time after the Parkland shootings. It was of the empty cargo hold of a delivery truck with the caption, "The first shipment of thoughts and prayers has been delivered to Parkland, Florida."

There has been a fair amount of justified criticism of the usual politicians' response to violent tragedies with "thoughts and prayers." Now, that might seem strange to point out in a chapel service that is all about prayer and reflection.

But it is important to point out what we understand prayer to do. If we understand prayer simply as petition to the deity-"Dear God, we have a problem, please fix it. Yours truly…"-then prayer, and certainly thoughts, can be seen as insufficient.

But if we view prayer not as a petition for wish-fulfillment or to speak to the divine, but as an opportunity to listen to the divine, then we understand something different to be going on.

The mystics and the philosophers of all the great religious traditions understood prayer in its most meaningful sense not as an opportunity to get God to listen to you, but as an opportunity to allow God to speak into you. It's a spiritual discipline that helps us to focus, to center on what's important, to be mindful. The answer to our prayers comes not when the Deity grants all our wishes, but when we, having opened ourselves up to inspiration, are filled with a sense of purpose, a direction to move forward in.

We have gathered here today for just such a moment. To open our hearts in prayer, but then to use those prayers as an opportunity to be spoken into, as an opportunity to hear the call to transform our world from a world of fear, anxiety, alienation, and violence, into a world of love, comfort, inclusion, and peace.

VOLUME: 13.75 linear feet

ACCESS: This collection is open to the public upon request.

COPYRIGHT: Please consult the archivist for information about duplication or publishing of any materials from this collection.


Administrative History
Founded in 1906, Shannon & Luchs was one of the largest D.C.-based real estate firms of the twentieth century. Over the course of its existence the firm offered property appraisals, new building construction, mortgage financing, insurance, sales, leasing, and property management services. Members of the Shannon and Luchs families managed the business until 1993, when the company’s residential real estate division was sold to Weichert, Realtors, and the commercial real estate division to the Polinger Company.
The founders, Morton J. Luchs and Herbert T. Shannon, met on a construction site when the latter was a real estate agent and the former a construction foreman for the project; they quickly decided to form a real estate business together. The two agreed that Shannon would serve as president of the new company and Luchs as vice president. Shannon’s sons William and then Foster each served in turn as president of the company. Likewise, Luchs’s son Frank and grandson Kenneth each served for a period as vice president of the company. After Foster Shannon passed away in 1989, Kenneth Luchs became president and remained in the position through the 1993 sale of the company.
Shannon & Luchs was known for its original approach to residential property development in its early years, constructing a number of architecturally varied residential developments from the 1910s through the 1930s. By mid-century, the firm had largely abandoned the construction arm of its business, shifting its focus to property management and commercial and residential sales. Shannon & Luchs managed many of the largest commercial properties in the District, as well as a variety of large apartment complexes. In the last half of the century the firm brokered a number of high profile commercial sales and supported an active residential sales division.


Scope and Content Note
This collection covers the period from circa 1900 to 1994, with the bulk of materials created between 1930 and 1970. Apart from an early check register and a small cache of early personal and advertising materials, very little of the firm’s first fifteen years are documented in this collection. Materials include appraisal reports and accompanying documentation, commercial brokerage and property management files, sales records, corporate and financial records, speeches and publications, office publications and policies, employee training documents and policies, correspondence, brochures, press releases, speeches, photographs and scrapbooks.
The majority of the materials in the collection was created by, or is associated with, members of the Luchs family. The bulk of the collection consists of appraisals conducted by Morton and Frank Luchs and their staff members from the 1920s through the 1960s. This portion describes not only properties but also their surrounding neighborhoods at given moments in time. The administrative series documents aspects of Shannon & Luchs management and the publicity series documents Shannon & Luchs’s marketing efforts and media coverage. The final series documents the personal and professional activities of Morton, Frank and Kenneth Luchs. The collection does not contain much evidence of Shannon & Luchs’s construction projects, nor does it provide much documentation of the insurance and mortgage financing aspects of the firm’s business.


Provenance
Kenneth Luchs donated the Shannon & Luchs archive to the American University Library in 2011.


Processing Note
The processing archivist divided the collection into four series: administrative, appraisals, publicity, and personal and professional activities. The folders in the appraisals series remain in their original order with original titles, with the exception of documents that were removed to separate series or separated into their own folders. Titles to existing folders were retained where possible.
Many of the remaining materials in the collection were originally unfoldered and arranged without a clear order, so the archivist arranged unfoldered items into acid-free folders, and assigned each a title. She then placed all folders in separate series and arranged them alphabetically within each series. Some large materials were removed to an oversize box. Items within folders were placed in chronological order throughout the collection, and undated materials were placed at the back of each folder. Metal fasteners and duplicate documents were removed. Where possible, bound documents were disbound. Moldy documents were replaced with photocopies then discarded.


Series Descriptions & Box and Folder Listing


Series 1: Administrative (1906-1994)
3 linear feet

This series consists of materials related to the administration of Shannon & Luchs. Contents include commercial brokerage files, property management files, investment property files, sales records, lease clause indexes, corporate and financial records, office publications and policies, employee orientation and training documents, and correspondence. This series is arranged alphabetically by folder title.


Box 1
1113-17 Fifteenth Street, N.W., March 1963-October 1963
1501 M Street Partnership Meeting Report, February, 1991
4600 Connecticut Ave. N.W. Tax Assessment Appeal, 1963-1964
6101 Blair Road, N.W., Blakeney Property, 1956-1962
Academy II Training Documents, August 1991
American Realty Services Group, 1977-1981
American University Undergraduate Contest, 1988
Brokerage Department Audit Report, May 1924
Check Register, 1906-1907
Cocoa Beach, Florida, 1964-1967, See also: oversize box 19
Columbia Plaza, 1965-1988
Columbia Plaza RESTRICTED, 1975-1987
Commercial Brokerage Division Presentation for Managers’ Meeting, March 23, 1988
Commercial Brokerage Division Quarterly Reports, 1989-1990
Commercial Brokerage Division Strategic Business Planning, February 19, 1992
Commercial Brokerage Maryland Region Business Plan Draft, circa 1990
Commercial Brokerage Sales and Leases, 1990-1992
Commercial Marketing Department Publication Examples, circa 1989
Community Research and Development, September 1962
Construction Department Annual Report, circa February 28, 1925
Construction Department Audit Report, July 8, 1924
Corporate Finances, Audit Report, circa February 28, 1925
Corporate Financial Statements, March 1924-June 1924
Corporate Records, Shannon & Luchs, Inc., 1924-1930
Corporate Records, Shannon & Luchs, Inc. 1931-1947
Corporate Records, Shannon & Luchs Construction Company, 1924-1935
Corporate Records, Shannon & Luchs Development Company, 1932-1950
Corporate Records, Shannon & Luchs Properties, Inc. 1931-1944
Corporation Annual Meetings, 1931


Box 2
Correspondence, 1923-1973
Correspondence, 1990-1992
Employee Manual, June 1992
Employee Orientation and Policies, 1987-1989
Employee Orientation Audio Tapes, circa 1990
Employee Relations, RESTRICTED, 1984-1991
Employee Training: System Plus Support Equals Success, 1978
Hecht Co., May 1952-June 1962
Heft - Rose Hill Tract, April 1963
Lease Clause Index, 1939-1942
Lease Clause Index A-L, circa 1947-1963
Lease Clause Index M-Z, circa 1947-1963
Lease Clause Index A-L, circa 1951-1973
Lease Clause Index M-Z, circa 1951-1973
Managers’ Retreat, April 1992
Market Reports, Commercial Brokerage Division, 1989
Memos, 1961-1963
Memos, 1964
Memos, 1990
National Munsey Joint Venture, 1958-1967
National Munsey Joint Venture Agreements, 1963
The Neighborhood Shopping Center in Washington, D.C. 1930-1941, 1992
North Capitol Plaza Building MEBA Pension Trust Proposal, August 1991
Office Buildings: Who will build them this time?, 1949
Office Directories, 1930-1962
Office Newsletter: CBD News & Profiles, June 1990
Office Newsletter: Just Between Us!, 1946-1947
Office Newsletter: Person to Person, January 1992-March 1992
Office Newsletter: Property Lines, 1989-1993
Office Newsletter: S & L Scoop, 1981-1992
Office Relocation for Shannon & Luchs, June 1986
Office Relocation for Shannon & Luchs, July 1986-August 1987
Out-of-Town Prospects, 1960-1962
Paraguayan Investment, April 1962-May 1962
Parking Stores, Inc., 1940-1963, See also: oversize box 19
Pennsylvania Building at 13th St. N.W., 1954-1959
Pennsylvania Building at 13th St. N.W., 1960-1962


Box 3
Power Plan Training Documents, June 1991
Property Management, 1990-1992
Property Management Division Marketing Strategy Internal Focus Group, March 27, 1989
Property Management Leasing Report Guidelines, circa 1990
Property Management Memo Index, circa 1930-1945
Property Management Memo Index, circa 1949-1963
Proposal for Management of Realtors Building, 14th St. N.W., January 27, 1987
Raleigh Hotel, 1962-1963
Sale of 3568 11th St. N.W., April 1907
Sales Contract for 1305 H St. N.W., May 1924
Sales Department, December 1962-July 1963
Sales Records, 1922-1954
Sales Records, 1928-1957
Sales Records, 1938-1955
Sales Records, 1952-1958
Sales Records, 1967-1968
The Shannon & Luchs Building, circa 1930
Shannon & Luchs Development Company Stock Certificates, 1934-1938
Tax Rates and Economic Trends, 1962
Thomas House, June 1964-July 1964
Trans-Lux Building, 1946-1964
Virginia Office, 1958-1961
Waechter, Alfred, Investor, 1961-1964
Washington Area Commercial Brokers Council State of the Market Report, 1991
Woodward Building Corporation, 1964
Wyatt Building, 1979
Wyatt Building, 1980-1987
Zoning Commission, March 1964


Series 2: Appraisals (1922-1964)
7 linear feet

This series documents property appraisals conducted by Shannon & Luchs throughout the Washington D.C. metropolitan area. It includes appraisal reports and accompanying documents, including worksheets and notes, affidavits, leases, contracts, photographs and correspondence. The more extensive appraisal reports describe not only each property under review but also the characteristics of the neighborhood in which it was located. Related documents often indicate the reason the appraisal was undertaken.
The first box contains the appraisal files of Shannon & Luchs co-founder Morton J. Luchs from the 1920s-1930s, while the remaining six boxes contain those of his son, Frank Luchs, from the 1930s-1960s. The folders in this series are arranged alphabetically by the name of the individual or institution for which the appraisal was made, by property name, by project name or by correspondent name. Folders with specific titles contain materials related to one client or property. Some oversize items were moved to flat storage (box 19).


Morton J. Luchs File
Box 4

A, 1926-1937, See also: oversize box 19
B, 1925-1937
C, 1924-1945
D, 1924-1929
E, 1934-1936
F, 1924-1934
G, 1926-1938
H, 1923-1939, See also: oversize box 19
Hechinger, January 1937-July 1937
Irving Trust Company, February 1935-March 1936
Johnson, September 1929-June 1931
K, 1928-1933
L, 1922-1937, See also: oversize box 19
M, 1923-1938
N, 1923-1938
O, 1935-1938
P, 1934-1937
Patterson Tract, 1925-1935
Patterson Tract Plans, circa 1925-1934, See also: oversize box 19
R, 1922-1936
S, 1923-1937, See also: oversize box 19
Swartzell, Rheem and Hansey Company, 1931-1936
T, 1924-1935
US-DC Fiscal Relations Study, September 1936-January 1937
US-DC Fiscal Relations Study Report, January 1937
V, 1926-1933
W, 1922-1938


Frank J. Luchs File
Box 5

A, 1946-1950
A, 1951-1954, See also: oversize box 19
A, 1955-1963, See also: oversize box 19
B, 1940-1950
B, 1951-1954
B, 1956-1958
B, 1959
B, 1960-1961
Behrend, 1985-1959
Benenson, 1959-1961
Brentwood Village, 1961-1964, See also: oversize box 19
C, 1942-1951
C, 1952
C, 1953-1956
C, 1957-1959, See also: oversize box 19
C, 1960, See also: oversize box 19
C, 1961-1962
Continental Life Insurance Company, April 1949-May 1949, See also: oversize box 19
D, 1941-1950

Box 6
D, 1951-1955
DC Government 9th and G Streets, July 1962-September 1963
DC Government, 4901-3-7 V St. N.W., July 1962-October 1962
Defense Homes Corporation, November 1947-January 1948, See also: oversize box 19
Drug Fair Drug Stores, December 1960-March 1962
E, 1943-1963
Esso Standard Oil Company, 1950-1954
Esso Standard Oil Company, 1955-1957
F, 1941-1952
F, 1953, See also: oversize box 19
F, 1954-1961
G, 1940-1952, See also: oversize box 19
G, 1953
G, 1954-1956
G, 1957-1960
Gelman Construction Company, May 1954-September 1955
Gelman Construction Company, October 1955-April 1956
GSA Evening Star Building, 1961-1962, See also: oversize box 19
GSA Parr-Franconia Warehouse, March 1957- March 1958
H, 1940-1949, See also: oversize box 19
H, 1950-1955, See also: oversize box 19
H, 1956-1963
Hecht Company, January 1951-November 1951


Box 7
Hornstein, June 1961-November 1961
I, 1952-1954
J, 1941-1954
J, 1956-1962
Justice Department, July 1955-December 1955
Justice Department Lake Barcroft Appraisal Report and Plans, July 1953
Justice Department Lake Barcroft Worksheets, Photos, Correspondence, 1953-1955
K, 1937-1947
K, 1948-1949
K, 1950-1952
K, 1953-1957
K, 1958
K, 1959
K, 1960-1963
Kaiser Engineers, August 1962-October 1962, See also: oversize box 19
Kotz Estate, 1958-1961
L, 1940-1946
L, 1947-1952
L, 1953-1954, See also: oversize box 19
L, 1955-1958
L, 1960-1961
L, 1962
M, 1939-1950

Box 8
M, 1951-1952
M, 1954-1959
M, 1960-1962
Mayflower Hotel Correspondence and Report, April 1952-February 1953
Mayflower Hotel Documents, May 1952
Mayflower Hotel Financials, circa April 1952-May 1952
Mayflower Hotel Photographs, circa April 1952-May 1952
Mayflower Hotel Plans, circa April 1952-May 1952
Mayflower Hotel Worksheets, circa April 1952-May1952
Mc, 1940-1958
N, 1940-1950
N, 1951-1962
National Capital Housing Authority, June 1951-September 1951
National Capital Transportation Agency, October 1962-November 1962
O, 1950-1960
P, 1938-1948, See also: oversize box 19
P, 1951-1960
Parr-Franconia Warehouse, 1952-1958, See also: oversize box 19
R, 1941-1948, See also: oversize box 19


Box 9
R, 1949-1950
R, 1951-1954
R, 1955-1962
S, 1939-1948
S, 1949-1950
S, 1951-1952
S, 1953-1954
S, 1955-1959
S, 1960-1962
Schlosberg, September 1951- February 1952
Schlosberg, May 1952-May 1954
Smith Condemnation, March 1963-December 1963
Southwest DC Redevelopment Appraisal Reports and Worksheets for Squares 497, 540 and 541, March 1953-February 1956
Southwest DC Redevelopment Appraisal Reports and Worksheets for Squares 538 and 539, December 1955-May 1957, See also: oversize box 19
Southwest DC Redevelopment Correspondence, 1952-1956
Southwest DC Redevelopment Photographs, circa 1951-1956
Southwest DC Redevelopment Plans, circa 1951-1956
Southwest DC Redevelopment Publicity and Published Studies, circa 1951-1956
Sun Life Insurance Company of Canada, 1947-1956
Sun Life Insurance Company of Canada, 1957-1962


Box 10
T, 1947-1951
T, 1952-1954
T, 1955-1961
Taylor, May 1955- September 1955
Teachers Insurance Company, March 1952-July 1953
U, 1939-1951
Union Central Life Insurance Company, 1946- 1947
Union Central Life Insurance Company, 1948-1949
Union Central Life Insurance Company, 1950, See also: oversize box 19
Union Central Life Insurance Company, 1951-1958
Union Central Life Insurance Company, 1959-1961
Union Central Life Insurance Company, 1962-1964
Union Central Life Insurance Company, Northwood Shopping Center, July 1949-August 1949
Union Central Life Insurance Company, Van Dorn Apartments, 1962-1964
V, 1953-1954
W, 1939-1949
W, 1950
W, 1951-1954
Washington Real Estate Board Appraisals Committee, 1941-1943
Washington Real Estate Board Appraisals Committee, 1946-1947
Washington Real Estate Board Appraisals Committee, 1948
Washington Real Estate Board Appraisals Committee, 1949-1950
Young, February 1953
Zirkin, April 1941-August 1941


Series 3: Publicity (circa 1900-1993)
3 linear feet

This series documents the public side of Shannon & Luchs. Many of the materials in this series were created or commissioned by the firm. Others were not, such as clippings from news and magazine articles. The series includes advertisements and other marketing materials, brochures, press releases, photographs, correspondence, clippings, documents related to the history of the firm, and scrapbooks.
The scrapbooks comprise the bulk of the series and contain Shannon & Luchs newspaper advertisements as well as articles about the firm and members of the Luchs family. Due to the large size of many of the scrapbooks, the first six boxes in this series contain oversize scrapbooks, while the remaining folders are arranged alphabetically in the boxes that follow.


Box 11
Scrapbook: Articles, 1922-1959
Scrapbook, 50th Anniversary: Advertisements, Articles and Letters, 1956
Scrapbook: Advertisements, 1947-1950
 
Box 12
Scrapbook: Articles, 1927-1940
Scrapbook: Advertisements, 1940-1943


Box 13
Scrapbook: Advertisements, 1948-1951
Scrapbook: Advertisements, 1951-1953
Scrapbook: Advertisements, 1953-1955


Box 14
Scrapbook: Advertisements, 1955-1957
Scrapbook: Articles, 1971-1976
Scrapbook: Articles, 1973-1979
Scrapbook, Corporate Advertising and PR: Advertisements and Articles, 1979-1986
Scrapbook: Articles, 1972-1986
Scrapbook #1: Articles, 1976-1980


Box 15
Scrapbook : Articles, 1964


Box 16
Scrapbook: Articles, 1972
Scrapbook #2: Articles, 1979-1981
Scrapbook #3: Articles, 1981-1982


Box 17
Ad Mockups, circa 1985-1990
Advertising Giveaways, circa 1990-1992
Advertising Payment, 1911
Brochures, circa 1972-1985
Business Properties Magazine articles by employees, 1988-1989
Capitol Vision: 85 Years with Shannon & Luchs VHS, circa 1991
Clippings, 1909-1956
Clippings, 1957-1963
Clippings, 1964-1993
Company History, circa 1906-1991
Correspondence, 1935-1992
Depression Era Advertising, 1930-1940
Foster Shannon Tributes, July 1989-August 1989
Historical Photographs for 85th Anniversary, December 1990
Insurance Newsletter: Professionals in Action, 1991
Kenneth Luchs Biographical Information, circa 1990-1992
Media Clipboard, 1989-1990
Middaugh & Shannon, 1901
Million Dollar Sales Club Awards Ceremony (1990), 1991
Photo Albums, circa 1930
Photographs of Buildings, circa 1900-1960, See also: oversize box 19
Photographs of Buildings, circa 1960-1990
Photographs of Ken Luchs, circa 1980-1992
Photographs of People, circa 1920-1970, See also: oversize box 19
Photographs of People, circa 1980-1990
Power Marketing Tools, circa 1989-1990
Premier Collection Residential Sales Listings, 1989-1990
Press Releases and Advertising Calendars, 1989-1990
The Purchasing Power of Your Rent Money, 1912
Radio Advertising, 1972-1981


Box 18
Scrapbook, 1955
Scrapbook, 1956-1964
Scrapbook, 1958-1960
Scrapbook, 1958-1960
Scrapbook: Foster Shannon, President, Washington Board of Realtors, 1971-1973
Scrapbook, Second National Bank, 1959
Scrapbook, Suburban Advertising Book #1, May 1913-June 1913
Shannon & Luchs 75th Anniversary Promotion, 1980-1981


Series 4: Personal and Professional Activities (1905-1994)
0.5 linear feet

This series documents the personal and professional activities of Morton, Frank and Kenneth Luchs, with an emphasis on the latter two. It includes awards and certificates, speeches, publications, contracts, correspondence, and documents related to participation in professional, political, social and personal activities. Folders are arranged alphabetically by title.


Box 18, continued
3543 Chesapeake St. N.W., 1939-1948
American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers, 1961-1964
American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers Meeting, December 1961-April 1962
Awards and Certificates, 1938-1986, See also: oversize box 19
Correspondence, 1949-1964
Correspondence, 1981-1994
Dodge Automobile, circa 1905
Frank and Kenneth Luchs School Papers, 1931-1964
Frank Luchs as 1960-61 WREB President Printing Block, circa 1960
Frank Luchs Speeches, circa 1947-1960
Freehold: The Magazine of Real Estate, September 1939
Hydrofoils, 1964
Ken Luchs Speeches and Publications, circa 1980-1990
Mortgage Bankers Association of Metropolitan Washington Membership, 1964
Morton Luchs Memberships, 1933-1935
Realtor Magazine, 1960-1971
Society of Real Estate Appraisers, April 1972
Washington Board of Realtors President Ken Luchs Congratulations, 1979-1981
Washington Board of Realtors Realtor of the Year Frank Luchs, 1962-1963
Washington Board of Realtors Realtor of the Year Ken Luchs, October 1983
Washington Board of Realtors Testimonial Dinner, 1961-1962
Washington Real Estate Board Correspondence, 1959
Washington Real Estate Board Correspondence, 1960
Washington Real Estate Board Documents, 1959-1962
Washington Real Estate Board News, May 1955


Oversize
Box 19

Administrative—Cocoa Beach Florida, 1964-1967
Administrative—Parking Stores, Inc., 1940-1963
Appraisals—Morton J. Luchs File—A, 1926-1937
Appraisals—Morton J. Luchs File—H, 1923-1939
Appraisals—Morton J. Luchs File—L, 1922-1937
Appraisals—Morton J. Luchs File—Patterson Tract Plans, circa 1925-1934
Appraisals—Morton J. Luchs File—S, 1923-1937
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—A, 1951-1954
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—A, 1956-1963
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—Brentwood Village, 1961-1964
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—C, 1957-1959
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—C, 1960
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—Continental Life Insurance Co., April 1949-May 1949
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—Defense Homes Corporation, November 1947-January 1948
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—F, 1953
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—G, 1940-1952
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—GSA Evening Star Building, 1961-1962
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—H, 1940-1949
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—H, 1950-1955
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—Kaiser Engineers, August 1962-October 1962
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—L, 1953-1954
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—P, 1938-1948
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—Parr-Franconia Warehouse, 1952-1958
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—R, 1941-1948
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—Southwest DC Redevelopment Appraisal Reports and Worksheets for Squares 538 & 539, December 1955-May 1957
Appraisals—Frank J. Luchs File—Union Central Life Insurance Company, 1950
Publicity—Photographs of Buildings, circa 1900-1960
Publicity—Photographs of People, circa 1920-1970
Personal and Professional—Awards and Certificates, 1938

It’s the Family, Stupid? Not Quite...How Traditional Gender Roles Do Not Affect Women’s Political Ambition

Following Chelsea Clinton's pregnancy announcement in April of 2014, media outlets speculated whether the future grandchild to Hillary Clinton would impact her potential presidential campaign in 2016. In this research paper, Jennifer Lawless addresses the question of whether family roles and responsibilities affect a potential candidate's political career. Lawless analyzes both female and male candidates and finds that traditional roles and responsibilities have little influence on candidates' decision to run for office.
Read the report here.



Not a ‘Year of the Woman’...and 2036 Doesn’t Look So Good Either

The 2014 election saw some incredible firsts for women: Republican Joni Ernst was elected the first woman to represent Iowa in the U.S. Senate; and Mia Love, a Republican from Utah, became the first black woman ever elected in the Republican Party to Congress. But when historians look back on the 2014 election, it will not be dubbed the "Year of the Woman," and the next several election cycles will likely fall short as well, write Jennifer L. Lawless and Richard L. Fox.
Read the report here.



Joseph C. Satterthwaite Collection

This collection of opera and vocal scores from the 19th and 20th centuries features works by Bizet, Chopin, Gounod, Massenet, Rossini, Saint-Saëns, and Wagner including the following operas: La Bohème, Le Cid, Faust, Guillaume Tell, and Parsifal. Selection:

  • Chopin, Frédéric, 1810-1849. Collection complète des valses et mazurka. Paris : E. Heu, [18--?] AU Special Collections M22.C545 W2
  • Schumann, Robert, 1810-1856. Cinquante mélodies; avec texte allemand et traduction française par Jules Barbier. Paris : Durand & Schoenewerk, [ca. 1875] AU Special Collections M1620.S395 F529
  • Offenbach, Jacques, 1819-1880. La grande duchesse de Gérolstein : opera bouffe en trios actes et quatre tableaux Paris : C. Joubert, [189-?] AU Special Collections M1503.O32 G7

For a complete list of titles, search the WRLC Catalog for the following search term (title or keyword): "Joseph Charles Satterthwaite Collection of Opera and Vocal Scores"


Robert Lehrman   Adjunct Professor, School of Communication

Areas of Expertise: Politics, media and communication; political communication

Bob Lehrman is an adjunct professor of Public Communication. He is a novelist, teacher, and speechwriter for dozens of Democratic political figures including Vice President Al Gore. He is co-author of the The Political Speechwriter’s Companion, with fellow American University adjunct professor Eric Schnure.


Bob Hone   Research Assistant Professor, School of Communication

Areas of Expertise: Politics, media and communication; fake news

Bob Hone is a Designer-In-Residence and Visiting Scholar in the School of Communications. He is the co-creator of "Factitious" a game that helps players spot fake news. "Factitious" has been played more than one million times since its release.


Scott Talan Assistant Professor, School of Communication

Areas of Expertise: Politics, media and communication; campaigns; social media and politics

Scott Talan, MPA, is an assistant professor of Public & Strategic Communication. He has held two elected offices and has also worked as a reporter covering politics.

Media and Publications

MFA & BA Alumni Websites

Washington DC Museums & Galleries

National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

Washington, DC offers an unsurpassed level of world class museums, most of which offer free admission and are within a 20 minute metrorail ride from our studio facilities. From the Phillips Collection (which was America's first museum of Modern Art and the place where American University's Art programs emerged more than a century ago) to the East and West buildings of National Gallery of Art; From the Hirshhorn and the National Museum of African Art to the National Museum of Women in the Arts, these amazing institutions act as a vital component of our students' experience in Washington,DC.  The American University Museum at the Katzen Center has become one of the leading museums of contemporary art in the region. Additionally there are many thriving spaces and fellowship opportunities for emerging artists.

Click on the links to find out more:

National Gallery of Art

National Portrait Gallery

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

National Museum of the American Indian

National Museum of African Art

National Museum of African American History and Culture

The Freer and Sackler National Museums of Asian Art

National Museum of Women in the Arts

National Museum of the American Indian

The Phillips Collection

Textile Museum

Dumbarton Oaks

Archives of American Art

The Renwick Gallery

Art Museum of the Americas

Kreeger Museum

Glenstone Museum 

American University Museum

Washington Project for the Arts

Transformer

Halcyon

Hamiltonian

STABLE

Curator’s Office

Hemphill Gallery

‘sindikit

ConnorSmith Contemporary

The Lemon Collective

Guest Spot

Mono Practice

School 33

Arlington Art Center

and more!

 

 

 

Painting looking down a tunnel made of sparse scaffolding. Through one side of the scaffolding we see soft greens and blues in vague shapes--vague black and grey shapes on the other. At the end of the tunnel the canvas grows lighter in color.

Studio Art

American University

Flexible Spending Accounts

.

Still have questions? Send us an email: econ@american.edu

Daniel RitterDaniel Ritter is a senior studying Interdisciplinary Studies: Communication, Legal Institutions, Economics, and Government (CLEG) in the School of Public Affairs. He is a member of the SPA Honors Program and AU Scholars. Daniel spends his spare time serving as the president of the Club Running team and reading about transportation policy and urbanism. In his role as project coordinator, Daniel creates content for and manages the Project's online presence, organizes events, and trains peer facilitators.

NYC
Fletcher Fernau, SIS/BA '09
Sarah DeStefano, SPA/BA '09
Marlene Vitale, SIS/BA '09
Ed Levandoski, SPA/BA '11
Victoria Diez, SOC/BA '12
Charlotte Bergmann, SOC/BA '16
Shiyan Yang, KSB/BSBA '14; KBS/MSF '16

Staff Liaison: Jessica Tanca

VOLUME: 3 linear feet

ACCESS: This collection is open to the public upon request

COPYRIGHT: Please consult the archivist for information about duplication or publishing of any materials from this collection.

RELATED COLLECTIONS: Records of the American University Library

Biographical Note

Donald D. Dennis was born on December 21, 1928 in Paris, France. He was educated at Bowdoin College and received his Master of Library Science degree from University of California, Berkeley. Dennis served in various positions throughout his career, including an assistant at the Free Library of Philadelphia, an instructor in Library Administration, Head of Serials Department, and Library School Librarian at Drexel Institute of Technology. He also served as Head Librarian, Associate Professor, and Department Head at Cedar Crest College. Additionally, he held positions at the University of Michigan and the National Library of Medicine before accepting a position as the University Librarian at American University in 1971.

During his time at Drexel Institute of Technology and continuing into his time at Cedar Crest College, Dennis worked on a book entitled Simplifying Work in Small Public Libraries. The book addresses principles of work simplification relating to routine library operations. In 1964, Dennis was involved in the planning and opening of Cedar Crest College’s new 100,000 volume library.

Dennis is known for his leadership contributions to American University in three areas: the Bender Library construction plan, the introduction of information technology in the library, and the founding of the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC).

Scope and Content Note

This collection contains correspondence, articles, reports and other official documents pertaining to Dennis’ graduate education, military service, and various university and library positions, and range in date from 1951 – 1990. The majority of the collection relates to Dennis’ time at American University. It details his involvement in the three-year construction plan for the new Bender Library, opened in 1979, and the implementation of OCLC, an international bibliographic database that enables library catalog sharing and interlibrary loan exchange requests. Additionally, his papers include information about the introduction of the library’s first automated circulation system and Dennis’ involvement in the creation of WRLC. This collection also includes other correspondence and documents relating to Dennis’ personal life. Other files relating to Dennis’ tenure as American University Librarian are located in the University Library Records in American University Archives. Arrangement of this collection is chronological and organized by job positions held by Donald Dennis.

Provenance

This collection was donated to American University Archives by Mary Lou Dennis in 2008.

Box and Folder Listing

Box 1

University of California, Berkeley (BA, Graduate)
1951 – 1955 US Naval Service
1957 – 1960 Free Library of Philadelphia
Drexel Institute of Technology
        1960 – 1962
        1963 – 1965
Cedar Crest College
        1961 – 1964
        1965 – 1966
        Simplifying Work in Small Public Libraries
        Simplifying Work in Small Public Libraries
        Simplifying Work in Small Public Libraries – Correspondence
University of Michigan
        1965 – 1967
        1968 – 1969
National Library of Medicine
        1967 – 1968
        1969
        1970
        1971, No Date

Box 2

American University
        1968 – 1975
        1976 – 1979
        1980 – 1982
        1983 – 1986
        1987 – 1990
        Clippings about AU, 1970 – 1990
        Cataloging Cost Summary, 1972
        Simplifying Work in Small Public Libraries, 1974
        Computers in Libraries Seminar, 1981
        No Date
1979 – 1980 Muhlenberg College (consultation)
1980 – 1981 University of Maryland classes
1982 – 1983 University of Maryland classes
Miscellaneous Personal Papers

Entrance Semesters
Fall, spring, summer.
Application Deadlines
Fall priority admissions, March 1; applications on a rolling basis until August 1.
Spring priority admissions, November 1; applications on a rolling basis until December 1.
Summer admission: May 1
Additional Requirements
Statement of Purpose
Transcripts
2 Letters of Recommendation
Resume
Praxis Core scores (Passing scores by DC standards on Praxis Core exam: Reading 156, Writing 162, Math 150).
Application
Online Application

Our MA in Economics is an applied, policy-oriented 30-36 credit program designed to ensure that our graduates make an impact by developing these three critical skills:

  • Use economic theory to explain outcomes and make informed predictions
  • Analyze data to rigorously answer questions, such as how specific policies will affect markets
  • Convey economic concepts and findings to a wide audience.

Coursework will prepare you to interpret economic models, test hypotheses, and analyze human and organizational behavior to make a positive impact on society.

Students can choose from five distinct tracks withing the program: general economics, development economics, gender analysis in economics, financial economic policy, and applied economics (online only).

Complete Degree and Course Requirements

  • Make open enrollment elections
  • Speak with benefits providers and campus & wellness partners
  • Take part in fair activities
  • Attend a Financial Wellness Seminar
  • Enter to win great prizes
  • Sign up for complementary massages and flu shots

For more information about the benefits fair, visit www.american.edu/hr/AhealthyU/wellness-fair.cfm.

Parliament of the World's Religions

November 4-5, 2018 | Toronto, Canada

CAS Professor and CLALS Affiliate Evan Berry and CLALS Research Associate Professor Rob Albro were invited to participate in the Parliament of the World's Religions in Toronto to discuss outcomes of the Religion & Climate Change project. The Parliament promotes global dialogue among the world's faiths, and offers an opportunity to engage faith-based actors and organization. Albro and Berry spoke with various religious leaders about project outcomes, and presented two public panels on diverse religious engagements with climate change and best practices in the area of faith-based engagement with climate change.

Shipping Materials FROM American University

UPS

Bring your package to the UPS Store, located in the tunnel across from Bender Arena. UPS pick-up occurs at 5:30 p.m.

FedEx

  1. Please bring a completed air bill and attach it to your package.
  2. Ensure that your air bill includes the following information:
    • Billing account number
    • Shipper and recipient names
    • Type of service
    • Approximate weight of package, if possible
  3. Call 1-800-463-3339 to schedule a pick-up.
    • Schedule your pick-up for NEXT DAY, no later than 4:30 p.m.
    • Pick-up location:

      American University Career Center
      4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
      Butler Pavilion, Fifth Floor
      Washington, DC 20016-8011

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Internships

Many of our students have found internships at the following organizations:

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

For more information, visit the Career Center website or watch the Literature Department career night video.

Writing Studies Program

Janice Iwama

Assistant Professor, Department of Justice, Law & Criminology

Janice IwamaJanice Iwama’s research interests involve the impact of crime on communities, disproportionate minority contact, prevalence of hate crimes, racial and ethnic issues, and the victimization of immigrants. She was an assistant professor at UMass Boston before coming to SPA. Iwama worked as a project manager at the Criminal Justice Policy Center and Institute on Race and Justice. She was also a research analyst at the Justice Research and Statistic Association in Washington, D.C. Iwama’s Ph.D. in criminology is from Northeastern University.

Symposium Presentations

McGuire, J.F., Palitz, S., Caporino, N.E., Kendall, P.C., & Piacentini, J. (2018, November). Evidence-based assessments in clinical practice for child anxiety disorders. In D. McKay (Chair), Predictors, moderators, and mediators in youth anxiety disorders. Symposium presentation at the 52nd Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Washington, DC.

Wu, M., Caporino, N.E., Perez, J., Thamrin, H., Peris, T., & Piacentini, J. (2018, November). Impact of treamtent expectations on exposure therapy variables in child anxiety. In D. McKay (Chair), Predictors, moderators, and mediators in youth anxiety disorders. Symposium presentation at the 52nd Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Washington, DC.

Caporino, N.E. & Neiman, J.N. (2017, October). Maximizing the benefit of treatment for selective mutism. Presentation at the 2017 Annual Conference of the Selective Mutism Association. Boston, MA.

Caporino, N.E., Keeton, C., Lee, P., & the CAMELS Team (2017, October). Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multi-Modal Extended Long-term Study: Depression and suicide outcomes. In D. Sakolsky (Chair), Results from the Child and Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Extended Long-Term Study. Symposium accepted for presentation at the 64th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Washington, DC.

Keeton, C., Lee, P., Caporino, N.E., & the CAMELS Team (2017, April). Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multi-Modal Extended Long-term Study: Depression and suicide outcomes. In D. Sakolsky (Chair), Results from the Child and Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Extended Long-Term Study. Symposium conducted at the 35th Annual Conference of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, San Francisco, CA.

Keeton, C., Lee, P., Caporino, N.E., & the CAMELS Team (2016, August). Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multi-Modal Extended Long-term Study: Depression and suicide outcomes. In G. Ginsburg (Chair), Long-term outcomes for anxious youth-results from the Child and Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Extended Long-Term Study. Symposium conducted at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Denver, CO.

Caporino, N.E., Cummings, C., Settipani, C., Read, K., Kendall, P.C., & the CAMS Team (2014, March). The therapeutic relationship with anxious youth. In K. Benito (Chair), Understanding process in exposure-based treatment for children: Implications for clinical settings. Symposium conducted at the 34th Annual Conference of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, Chicago, IL.

Caporino, N.E. (Chair; 2013, November). Using technology to improve CBT for youth anxiety. Symposium conducted at the 47th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Nashville, TN.

Cummings, C., Caporino, N.E., Settipani, C., Read, K., Kendall, P.C., & the CAMS Team (2013, November). Therapeutic relationship in CBT, medication, and combination treatment for anxious youth. In N.E. Caporino (Chair), The Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS): Five years later. Symposium conducted at the 47th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Nashville, TN.

Cummings, C., Caporino, N.E., Settipani, C., Read, K., & Kendall, P.C. (2013, August). Therapeutic relationship in CBT, medication, and combination treatment for anxious youth. In J. Piacentini (Chair), Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS): Predictors of response and 5-year outcomes. Symposium conducted at the 121st Convention of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.

Frank, H., Benito, K., Caporino, N.E., Freeman, J., Garcia, A., Josyula, P., & Kendall, P.C. (2013, April). Family accommodation of anxiety symptoms in children and adolescents. In N.E. Caporino (Chair), Child anxiety in the family context. Symposium conducted at the 33rd Annual Conference of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, La Jolla, CA.

Caporino, N.E., Settipani, C.A., O'Neil, K.A., Podell, J.L., Beidas, R.S., & Kendall, P.C. (2013, April). Youth anxiety and parent factors over time: Directionality of change among youth treated for anxiety. In N.E. Caporino (Chair), Child anxiety in the family context. Symposium conducted at the 33rd Annual Conference of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, La Jolla, CA.

Caporino, N.E., Morgan, J., Storch, E.A., & Murphy, T.K. (2011, November). Targeting the accommodation of pediatric OCD symptoms in family-based CBT. In C. Caska & K. Renshaw (Chairs), Family members of those with OCD: Accommodation, attributions, and treatment. Symposium conducted at the 45th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Toronto, Canada.

Storch, E., Caporino, N., Morgan, J., DeNadai, A., Lewin, A., Rojas, A.,…Murphy, T.K. (2011, November). CBT for pediatric OCD via web camera. In C. Chow & C.L. Weiner (Chairs), Innovative treatments for anxiety disorders in youth: Examining predictors, moderators, and mediators of treatment outcome. Symposium conducted at the 45th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Toronto, Canada.

Caporino, N.E., & Storch, E. (2011, July). Family accommodation in pediatric OCD. In B. Van Noppen (Chair), Current trends in OCD family research. Symposium conducted at the 18th Annual Conference of the International Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Foundation, San Diego, CA.

Caporino, N.E., Storch, E.A., Geffken, G.R., Jacob, M.L., Reid, J.M., & Goodman, W.K. (2011, March). Development and psychometric properties of the Florida Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory. In J.S. Abramowitz (Chair), Recent advances in the assessment of child and adult obsessive-compulsive disorder. Symposium conducted at the 31st Annual Conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, New Orleans, LA.

Caporino, N.E., Storch, E.A., Morgan, J., Beckstead, J., Phares, V., & Murphy, T.K. (2010, November). Family accommodation in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder. In N.E. Caporino (Chair), Recent advances in pediatric OCD research. Symposium conducted at the 44th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, San Francisco, CA.

Storch, E.A., Caporino, N.E., Murphy, T.K., Lack, C.W., Geffken, G.R., Jacob, M.L., & Goodman, W.K. (2010, November). Sleep-related problems in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder. In C. Weiner & D. Pincus (Chairs), Sleep disturbance and anxiety disorders in childhood. Symposium conducted at the 44th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, San Francisco, CA.

Storch, E.A., Lehmkuhl, H.D., Ricketts, E., Geffken, G., Marien, W., Caporino, N., & Murphy, T.K. (2010, November). An open trial of intensive family-based cognitive-behavioral therapy in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder who are medication partial- or non-responders. In K. Gallo & D. Pincus (Chairs), Feasibility and acceptability of innovative treatment formats for youth anxiety. Symposium conducted at the 44th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, San Francisco, CA.

Caporino, N., Morgan, J., & Storch, E. (2010, October). Family accommodation in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder. In J.M. Park (Chair), Advances in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder. Symposium conducted at the 40th Annual Congress of the European Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Therapy, Milan, Italy.

Caporino, N., Storch, E., & Murphy, T. (2010, March). Parental experiences of having a child with obsessive-compulsive disorder: Associations with clinical characteristics and caregiver adjustment. In B.L. Mahaffey (Chair), Anxious youth: The relationship between parenting and anxiety in childhood and young adulthood. Symposium conducted at the 30th Annual Conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, Baltimore, MD.

Caporino, N., Storch, E., Murphy, T., Geffken, G.R., Jacob, M., & Lack, C. (2010, March). Sleep-related problems in pediatric OCD. In C.A. Alfano (Chair), Sleep problems in youth with anxiety disorders: Who and what should we be treating? Symposium conducted at the 30th Annual Conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, Baltimore, MD.

Poster Presentations

Weinstock, R., Tone, E., & Caporino, N.E. (2018, April). Examining the relationship between public stigma and children's anxiety/depression. Poster presented at the 38th Annual Conference of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, Washington, DC.

Ronkin, E., Tone, E., Caporino, N.E., MacKinnon, C., & Lindsey, E. (2017, November). The impact of race on the association between hostile attribution biases toward mothers and child rule-breaking behaviors. Poster presented at the 51st Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, San Diego, CA.

De Simone Irace, C., Caporino, N.E., & Ellman, L. (2017, July). Obsessive-compulsive symptoms and prodromal psychosis in young adults. Poster presented at the 24th Annual Conference of the International OCD Foundation, San Francisco, CA.

Herres, J., Caporino, N.E., Cummings, C., & Kendall, P.C. (2017, April). Emotional reactivity to daily events in youth with anxiety disorders. Poster presented at the 2017 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Austin, TX.

Weinstock, R., Crowell McQuarrie, S., Ronkin, E., & Caporino, N.E. (2016, November). Youth anxiety and caregiver responses to violent news in the media: The role of race. Poster presented at the Special Interest Group Expo, 50th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, New York, NY.

McQuarrie, S., & Caporino, N.E. (2016, November). Measuring caregiver impact on children's violent news media exposure: Development and initial validation of the Caregiver Responses to Youth Media Exposure (CRYME). Poster presented at the 50th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, New York, NY.

Palitz, S., Caporino, N.E., & Kendall, P.C. (2016, November). Signal detection analysis of the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children. Poster presented at the 50th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, New York, NY.

Crowell McQuarrie, S., Rodrigues, N., Ronkin, E., Weinstock, R., Caporino, N., & Wienke Totura, C.M.. (2015, November). Family cohesion as a protective factor against depression in middle school children who have experienced the death of a parent. Poster presented at the Special Interest Group Expo, 49th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Chicago, IL.

Crowell, S.E., Ronkin, E., Weinstock, R., Caporino, N., & Totura, C.M.W. (2015, November). The influence of family factors and trait affect on type of peer victimization involvement. Poster presented at the Special Interest Group Expo, 49th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Chicago, IL.

Mendoza, H., Goodnight, B.L., Caporino, N.E., & Masuda, A. (2015, November ). The roles of self-concealment and psychological inflexibility in psychological distress among Latino/a college students. Poster presented at the Special Interest Group Expo, 49th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Chicago, IL.

Ronkin, E., Crowell McQuarrie, S., Weinstock, R., Caporino, N., MacKinnon-Lewis, C., & Lindsey, E. (2015, November). The impact of race/ethnicity on the association between parenting practices and child internalizing symptoms. Poster presented at the Special Interest Group Expo, 49th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Chicago, IL.

Weinstock, R.E., Rojas, A., Caporino, N., Davila, E., & Phares, V. (2015, November). The role of acculturation in adolescent internalizing problems: Mediational pathways. Poster presented at the Special Interest Group Expo, 49th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Chicago, IL.

Weinstock, R.E., Ronkin, E., Crowell, S.J., Caporino, N.E., & Totura, C.M.W. (2015, November). Coping with peer victimization: The impact of family cohesion on mental health. Poster presented at the 49th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Chicago, IL.

Brodman, D.M., Carper, M.M., Peterman, J., McGann, K., Caporino, N.E., Kendall, P.C., & the CAMS Team (2013, November). Baseline factors relating to time course of treatment response and remission in anxious youth: A survival analysis. Poster presented at the 47th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Nashville, TN.

Caporino, N.E., Read, K.L., Settipani, C.A., Kendall, P.C., & the CAMS Team (2013, April). Sleep-related problems and treatment effects for CAMS youth with anxiety disorders. Poster presented at the 33rd Annual Conference of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, La Jolla, CA.

Caporino, N.E., Brodman, D., Kendall, P.C., & the CAMS Team. (2012, April). Defining treatment response and remission in child anxiety: Signal detection analyses of the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale and the Child Behavior Checklist. Poster presented at the 32nd Annual Conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, Arlington, VA.

Caporino, N.E., Morgan, J., Lewin, A.B., Rojas, A., Brauer, L., Larson, M.J.,…Storch, E.A. (2012, April). Preliminary investigation of web-camera delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy for youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Poster presented at the 32nd Annual Conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, Arlington, VA.

Caporino, N.E., Morgan, J., Lewin, A.B., Rojas, A., Brauer, L., Larson, M.J.,…Storch, E.A. (2011, November). Preliminary investigation of web-camera delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy for youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Poster presented at the Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Expo, 45th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Toronto, Canada.

McGuire, J.F., Morgan, J., Caporino, N., Brauer, L., Lewin, A., Piacentini, J.,…Storch, E. (2011, November). Pilot examination of a psychosocial treatment to improve resilience and reduce impairment in youth with tics. Poster presented at the 45th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Toronto, Canada.

Caporino, N.E., Morgan, J., Lewin, A.B., Rojas, A., Brauer, L., Larson, M.J.,…Storch, E.A. (2011, July). Preliminary investigation of web-camera delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy for youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Poster presented at the 18th Annual Conference of the International Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Foundation, San Diego, CA.

Caporino, N.E., Morgan, J., Beckstead, J., Phares, V., Murphy, T.K., & Storch E.A. (2011, March). structural equation analysis of family accommodation in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder. Poster presented at the 31st Annual Conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, New Orleans, LA.

Park, J.M., De Nadai, A., Caporino, N.E., & Storch, E. (2010, November). The role of oppositional defiant disorder in co-morbid pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: A preliminary investigation. Poster presented at the 44th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, San Francisco, CA.

Caporino, N.E., Storch, E.A., Morgan, J., Beckstead, J., Phares, V., & Murphy, T.K. (2010, July). Family accommodation in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder. Poster presented at the 17th Annual Conference of the International Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Foundation, Washington, DC.

Storch, E.A., Caporino, N.E., Morgan, J.R., Piacentini, J., & Murphy, T.K. (2010, July). Living with Tics: Development and pilot examination of a psychosocial treatment to improve resilience and coping in youth with tics. Poster presented at the 17th Annual Conference of the International Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Foundation, Washington, DC.

Storch, E.A., Caporino, N.E., Morgan, J.R., Piacentini, J., & Murphy, T.K. (2010, February). Living with Tics: Development and pilot examination of a psychosocial treatment to improve resilience and coping in youth with tics. Poster presented at the 18th EPA European Congress of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany.

Caporino, N.E., Storch, E., Larson, M.J., Muroff, J., Geller, D., Reid, J.,…Murphy, T. (2009, August). Predictors of functional impairment in children and adolescents with OCD. Poster presented at 16th Annual Obsessive Compulsive Foundation Conference, Minneapolis, MN.

Caporino, N.E., Storch, E., Muroff, J., Geller, D., Frost, R., Reid, J., & Bodzin, D. (2009, August). Hoarding symptoms in a pediatric OCD sample: Psychometric properties of the Child Saving Inventory-Parent Version (CSI-PV). Poster presented at the 16th Annual Obsessive Compulsive Foundation Conference, Minneapolis, MN.

Tarquini, S., Caporino, N., & Karver, M.S. (2008, April). Helpline counselors' prediction of youth suicide risk. Poster presented at the 41st Annual Conference of the American Association of Suicidology, Boston, MA.

Caporino, N., & Karver, M.S. (2007, August). The acceptability of treatments for adolescent depression to multi-ethnic sample of girls and their mothers. Poster presented at the 115th Convention of the American Psychological Association, Division 12, San Francisco, CA.

Caporino, N., Karver, M.S., Lipien, L., Kaminska, K., & Abdullatif, Q. (2004, October). Measuring adolescent strengths. Poster presented at the 2004 Kansas Conference in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Lawrence, KS.

Employee Eligibility

  • Full-time faculty or staff members are eligible as of the first of the month following date of hire.
  • Changes may be made during open enrollment or when a qualifying event occurs.

Fee

  • If electing the health care and/or dependent flexible spending account there is a monthly administrative fee of $3.25 (2018) or $1.45 (2019).  

economics

Amos Golan published the book Foundations of Info-Metrics (Oxford University Press, 2017).

Alison Jacknowitz

Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Professor of Public Administration and Policy

Alison JacknowitzAlison Jacknowitz is the new Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for SPA. Her research interests focus on children’s well-being, particularly food insecurity, poverty, food assistance, and early childhood education. Her research has been supported by several organizations including the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research, the United States Department of Agriculture, the Institute for Research on Poverty, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and Feeding America. Her work has appeared in a variety of journals including Demography; Journal of Nutrition; Journal of Policy Analysis and Management; Pediatrics, Social Service Review; and The Journal of Human Resources. She is a member of the Technical Advisory Group of Feeding America.

Grand Prize, 2018
@Humanity by Theodore Blossom and Robbie Price
Grand Prize, 2017
Planet B by Ashley Holmes
Grand Prize, 2016
A Watershed Love Story by Julia Schaefer-Gomez
Grand Prize, 2015
DUDE! Or the Blissful Ignorance of Progress by Patrick Webster
Grand Prize, 2014
Be a Better Roommate by Patrick Gilmore
Grand Prize, 2013
A Brief History of the 5-cent Bag Tax by Craig Schattner
Grand Prize, 2012
Clean Coal by the Bituminous Marketing Agency by Alexander Lucas

New SPA Leadership

 

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

AU Memo Letterhead

Memorandum August 31, 2016

To:
AU Community
From:
Neil Kerwin, President
Caleen Sinnette Jennings, Chair, Council on Diversity and Inclusion; Professor of Performing Arts, College of Arts and Sciences
Subject:
President's Council on Diversity and Inclusion

We are pleased to inform the university community of the membership of the President's Council on Diversity and Inclusion.

The members come from every major campus constituency-faculty, students, staff, and alumni. They each bring expertise and experience that will contribute greatly to the university's efforts to build and maintain a community where all can pursue learning, work, and service in an environment that allows us all to thrive.

The members are:

  • Caleen Sinnette Jennings, chair, Council on Diversity and Inclusion; professor of performing arts, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Kelly Alexander, chair, Diversity Committee; member, Staff Council; director of public relations, University Communications and Marketing
  • Samssa Ali, program coordinator, Pakistan Women's Council, School of International Service
  • Sara Bendoraitis, director of programming, outreach and advocacy, Center for Diversity and Inclusion, Office of Campus Life
  • Tristan Cabello, director of American studies, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Lia Epperson, professor and associate dean for faculty and academic programs, Washington College of Law
  • Alan Kraut, professor of history, College of Arts and Sciences
  • Lauren Lumpkins, director of diversity and inclusion, Student Government
  • Sara Nieves-Grafals, member, AU Alumni Board; clinical psychologist
  • Thi Nguyen-Southern, associate general counsel, Office of the General Counsel
  • Mark Schaefer, university chaplain, Kay Spiritual Life Center, Office of Campus Life
  • Kenya Sumner, president, SOC Graduate Leadership Council

As soon as schedules allow, the council will be convened for an initial organizational meeting and their first consideration of agenda items.

The mission of the council will be to monitor and report progress on elements of our diversity and inclusion plan, reaffirmed in an update that I shared last April. They will also review and suggest changes in institutional policies and practices, generate new ideas, and solicit input from the larger American University community.

Based on this charge, the agenda of the council will evolve as it identifies areas in need of attention, either through its own inquiry and deliberation, or from issues, concerns, and ideas presented by members of the university community and by external circumstances that arise. The council will also act as an important source of advice and counsel when issues and incidents on our campus or in the larger society require a response from our university.

The council will have access to any resources needed-people and materials, both internal to the university and external-to assist them in their work.

This promises to be an exciting, active, and challenging year for our campus as we seek to understand and get more deeply involved with what's happening around us. Members of the community who wish to communicate with the council may do so at DICouncil@american.edu.


Catherine Cohen, an SIS graduate student, sitting with her friend's grandma in Azerbaijan

Winner of SIS Faces

"Stories with Nənə on the Border" by Catherine Cohen
Alibeyli, Tovuz, Azerbaijan; 2018

Hearing stories from my friend's grandma about the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict in front of the window, where I found out later there was a bullet mark on the wall.

Our Team

The Media Services team at American University Library is made up of 4 employees.

Frequently Asked Questions

View additional research opportunities in American University's Psychology Department.

Help IconSearch profiles explained.

Workshop on Environmental Protection, Artificial Intelligence, and Machine Learning

On September 21, the Partnership for Technology Innovation and the Environment will host a workshop on applications of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to support environmental data analysis and decision-making processes. Advances in uses of AI tools offer in the environmental field offer a great deal of promise for improving decision-making and environmental quality. This workshop will address two specific applications of AI tools -- risk assessments and water quality.

Marketing and Communications

Adel Ait-Ghezala Graduate Research Fellowship

We would like to congratulate the recipients of the Adel Ait-Ghezala Graduate Research Fellowship for the academic year 2018-19:

Ifeoluwa M. Olawole
School of Public Service

Charlotte Prud' Humme
School of Communications

The Adel Ait-Ghezala Graduate Research Fellowships are available to graduate students who are full-time enrolled students in a master's or doctoral program at American University. The fellowships are intended to support applied, educational or policy-relevant research programs designed to improve the lives of the citizens of developing countries. This is a competitive fellowship. Students must be making satisfactory academic progress (SAP) toward their degrees in order to be eligible.

Fellowship program for Academic Year 2019-2020 will be announced in January 2019.

Application Guidelines for Academic Year 2018-19 are now available along with the Application Cover Letter.

Doctoral Student Research Scholarships

The Office of the Provost provides competitive intramural research scholarships to doctoral students to support their dissertation research. The scholarships are managed by the Vice Provost for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies. Funds are available to doctoral graduate students who:

  • have been admitted to candidacy for the doctorate before the scholarship period begins (in some departments admission to candidacy may be spoken of as "ABD - "All But Dissertation." If you have questions about this requirement, check with your department.)
  • have an approved dissertation proposal, and
  • have an active dissertation chair and committee.

The activity may occur anywhere in the world. The scholarships are intended to provide supplemental funds to support basic research, field work, lab work, or closely related endeavors. Scholarships are available in amounts up to $5,000.

The 2018-19 program will be announced in December 2017 and applications will be accepted until the deadline date.

Application Files 2018-19 and Final Report (PDF Format). Login using your AU email address and password. Then, download the files you need to your computer.

Funding Guidelines FY19

Here is a list of the FY19 Recipients for the Doctoral Student Research Scholarships.

Hart A. Massey Fellowship

The Hart A. Massey Fellowship is awarded each academic year to one or more incoming Canadian students (enrolled as traditional or online students) pursuing graduate studies full-time at American University. The fellowship is applied to tuition charges. Online students are eligible to apply for this award.

We would like to congratulate the recipients of the Hart A. Massey Fellowship for the academic year 2018-2019:

Kogod School of Business
Tate Quest
Navjeet Sandhu

School of Communication
Ava Ashrafian

School of International Service
Ghadi Joudah
Diego Zavala

School of Public Affairs
Dylan Lamberti
Radhika Sikhakhane

Applications for the next round of funding will be announced in February 2019.

United Methodist Graduate Scholarship

We would like to congratulate the recipients of the United Methodist Graduate Scholarship for the academic year 2018-19:
 

School of International Service
Daniel Boerger (International Peace and Conflict Resolution)
Emily Ronis (Global Governance, Politics, and Security)
Cecelia Ward (Global Governance, Politics, and Security)

School of Communication
Scott Bledsoe (Political Communication)
Rebekah Escala (Strategic Communication)
Jake McClory (Political Communication)
Mary McMillan (Film and Media Arts)

The United Methodist Graduate Scholarship is awarded each academic year to a graduate student enrolled at American University who is a full member of the United Methodist Church for at least one year prior to application. The scholarship is applied to tuition charges. Awards are renewable (but not guaranteed) for one year to students who show satisfactory progress towards their graduate degree. This is a competitive award, and applicants must meet minimum University graduate admission requirements to be considered. Online students are eligible to apply for this award.

United Methodist Application and Checklist (PDF Format)

United Methodist On-Line Application (PDF Format)

Applications for the next round of funding will be announced in February 2019.

Note: Certain conditions on your computer, such as security settings or browser cookies, can prevent you from viewing a PDF. Often, the fastest solution is to try to open the page using a different browser. If you still experience difficulties, please contact Anita Brown abrown@american.edu.

Center members at computer with neurons on the screen

AU's Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, established in 2012, provides a unique interdisciplinary research and training environment that promotes excellence in the study of brain function and its manifestation in behavior.

The Center strives to support neuroscience research efforts and promote collaborative interactions among neuroscientists as well as scientists from other disciplines. The Center also provides core research facilities for neuroscience research faculty and scientists from other disciplines.

Related Degrees and Programs

Research Interests

  • Stephen Casey: Complex Analysis, Harmonic Analysis, Differential and Integral Geometry, Number Theory. Applications to Computational Science and Signal, Information and Image Processing.
  • Mary W. Gray: Survey sampling. Applications of statistics to law, education, economics, development, and human rights. Legal issues in information technology.
  • Devin Green: DNA sequencing data, Gene interactions, Anti-microbial drug resistance, Antibiotic cycling, Discrete optimization, Graph Theory
  • Nathalie Japkowicz: Machine Learning, Data Science, Big Data Analysis, Anomaly Detection, Data Stream Mining, Neural Networks. Application to Defense and Security, Cybersecurity, Medicine.
  • Mohammad Mehdi Owrang: Database Modeling, Intelligent Databases, Automatics Knowledge Acquisition, Data Mining on Medical Databases, and Breast Cancer Prognostic Modeling
  • Art Shapiro: Computational and psychophysical models of color, motion, and scene organization. Graphics and illusions. Visual computation at low light levels. Human representation of information. Reality: constructed, perceived, augmented and virtual.
  • Michael Treanor: Game design and game studies, Social simulation, Procedural content generation.
  • Bei Xiao: Human perception, Computer vision, Tactile perception, Image analysis, Computer graphics. Human and machine perception of physical properties of objects.

2020 Goal Reached 2 Years Early

AU’s carbon neutral campus is the result of a community-wide effort led by the Office of Sustainability, with significant contributions from Facilities Management and Transportation Programs. Students, faculty, and staff have all contributed to the milestone success of AU's sustainability plan.

Learn More

The American University Eagle Travel Club offers opportunities to connect with alumni and friends on a global scale. Blending exciting explorations and enlightening educational experiences, we make travel easy with first-class accommodations and experienced travel partners.

Changing Pedagogical Paradigms

This topic recognizes that higher education (HE) today calls for faculty to reexamine and address accepted pedagogical norms. Central to a paradigm shift is the fundamental question of "who is the educator"; and what values drive choices and approaches to teaching-learning.

The Center for Diversity & Inclusion offers many ways for students to get involved with LGBTQA programs/events/services on campus & off campus:

AU Memo Letterhead

Memorandum April 22, 2016

To:
AU Community
From:
Neil Kerwin, President
Subject:
Community Response to Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan and Next Steps

At the end of February, I proposed a series of five actions in areas to improve AU's progress in promoting areas of diversity and inclusion. I invited feedback no later than the end of March and received a number of thoughtful and serious replies. Thank you to all who provided ideas, shared concerns, expressed support, and volunteered to be part of the solutions. I'll summarize the feedback and identify next steps.

Summary of Feedback on Plan

The comments received helped to shape our thinking about the actions we proposed and will help to improve the implementation. Themes included the following ideas:

  • Seek a definition of diversity that is broadly inclusive.
  • Select members of our new presidential council who reflect representation and expertise, and ensure that members are grounded in appropriate training.
  • Include training resources on inclusive classrooms for all faculty.
  • Extend education and training for cultural competence beyond new undergraduate students.
  • Reiterate our commitments to academic freedom and freedom of expression, as we introduce requirements for courses or training to improve inclusion.

Concerns were expressed that the new core course requirements must not limit diversity of ideas or create orthodoxy and that reinforcement of faculty hiring procedures must not introduce discrimination. We will bear these concerns in mind as we implement our plans.

We must constantly keep in balance our commitments to academic freedom and free expression and the progress we make on diversity and inclusion. These values are not mutually exclusive. To the contrary, they should reinforce each other and make our community stronger. We will reduce ignorance and create an environment that is intentionally inclusive, encouraging diverse perspectives and cultivating capacities for effective responses to those we find challenging.

Confident that our basic proposals are sound, our plans are more informed as a result of the support, suggestions, and cautions received. We will move forward with next steps on the five elements of our plan.

Next Steps on Five Action Items

1. Provide Oversight, Guidance, Measurement of Progress, Resource Plans through the President's Council
With feedback from the community, we've made progress on the charter for this council and important characteristics of members and leaders. It is evident this body must be both broadly inclusive and expert.

Responsibilities will include overseeing the other elements of this plan and reviewing and reforming relevant policies and practices, including our extensive and growing training programs. The council will develop new ideas for promoting both diversity and inclusion as well as for receiving and evaluating ideas from others. They will assess the institution's performance in maintaining diversity and promoting inclusion and work with the president to promote accountability for progress and secure the appropriate intervention when improvement is needed.

Given these broad-ranging considerations and critical functions, assembling the council is a task requiring great care. We received several nominations for members on the council. I have already begun the process of securing the leaders for the council, to be drawn from the ranks of our senior faculty and staff, and urge the community to offer further nominations of members and expressions of interest. If you or someone you know has an interest, experience, or expertise in this work, contact me at president@american.edu.

The council will be fully constituted, with a chair or co-chairs, by midsummer. We will convene the group for an organizing and training retreat as the first order of business. The council will be ready to assume a robust agenda during the 2016-2017 academic year.

2. Work with the Faculty Senate to Introduce Diversity Courses in the AU Core
Since last summer, AU faculty have been working to develop a new academic core curriculum, to replace the current General Education structure. Members of the community have weighed in on successive drafts of the proposal. The Faculty Senate will review a draft of the proposal at its May meeting.

The new proposed core includes two required transitions courses, AU Experience 1 and 2 (AUx2), each for 1.5 credit hours. These will be hybrid courses, in which online content created by a group of AU faculty will stimulate discussion in cohorts of 19 students. AUx2 will delve into social and cultural relations, and issues of diversity, identity, and race. These courses will be piloted in four sections in AY 2016-17, revised and expanded the following year, and fully implemented with the new Core in AY 2018-2019.

Also planned in the revised AU Core is a new Diverse Experience course requirement. Courses in the students' major, core offerings, or free electives used to meet this requirement will build on the content introduced in AUx2 and will attend to issues of diversity and inclusion in their various forms. Planning for Diverse Experience courses will begin with approval of the new core, for implementation in AY 2018-2019.

3. Revise Policies and Procedures to Improve Diversity and Inclusion
We pledged to review our existing policies related to diversity and inclusion to determine if they properly advance those values. Our current policy is being reviewed and revised to provide sufficient authority and clarity to deal effectively with incidents of bias and discrimination that threaten, harm, or impair the ability to fully enjoy the benefits of this university. A revised draft will be prepared for review by our new council, which also will examine existing and new practices designed to affect diversity and inclusion.

4. Recruit Diverse Candidates to the Faculty
Our process of recruitment must bring greater diversity to the faculty and curriculum. As a result, five tenure-track faculty positions have been submitted by the deans to extend our current faculty areas of depth and specialization. Four of these positions will be filled by faculty with expertise in Race and Public Health Policy(CAS); Race and Global Studies (SIS); Race Media and Communication (SOC) and a position in Race and Justice (SPA). The specialization of the fifth new position has yet to be identified but will be housed in CAS. Expansion of the faculty diversity will continue as a priority well beyond this initial phase of hiring. < /p>

In addition, beginning in the fall of 2016, AU will increase training for faculty searches, which follow the university's affirmative action procedures to ensure equal access to all candidates. In our faculty recruitment efforts, we will emphasize the ability to mentor and support students from diverse backgrounds, cross-cultural communication skills, experience with different teaching strategies and learning styles, or a research agenda that addresses or incorporates issues that involve or affect diverse groups.

5. Develop Programs to Cultivate Inclusive Classrooms and Campus Environments
I will work with the dean of academic affairs, Human Resources, and the Office of Campus Life to articulate a comprehensive training approach to diversity and inclusion, not only for new tenure-line faculty appointments, but also for all faculty, office supervisors, and student leaders in order to create inclusive environments in their classrooms, offices, residence halls, and student organizations. Training efforts will be reviewed by our new council on an ongoing basis.

Conclusion

I look forward to working with you on these action steps, and I will write again in July to provide updates on appointments to our council and additional progress in each of the areas above.

DC

Rebecca Bock SIS/BA '15
Tony Cohn, SOC/BA '15
Palak Gosar, SPA/BA '13
Thomas Florczak CAS/BA '17
Aava Khajavi, CAS/BA '16
Zach Kopin, CAS/BA '14
Claire Moyer KSB/BA '13
Danyal Sheikh KSB/BA/BS '17
Evie Unsworth, SPA/BA '16

Staff Liaison: Carla Gochicoa

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Any AU alumnus/a/i who graduated in the last 10 years and lives in the DC or NYC metropolitan areas are welcome to join a Young Alumni Chapter. Both chapters sponsor social, cultural, and professional events and work with other affinity groups to create meaningful programs to enrich the lives of young alumni.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Full-Time Faculty

CTRL has prepared resources for Faculty for creating culturally sustaining classrooms and spaces.

Affiliated Events

Mold

Lindsey DePasse
Fall 2015
International Affairs

Graduate Professional Studies was an invaluable opportunity which provided a helping hand in navigating a career shift in international affairs as well as acclimating into the expectations of graduate school-level work. By the end of the program I had an entire new group of international friends and colleagues and had solidified my next step post-GPS graduation. My choice in sticking around AU to pursue my master's degree really says it all.

Spring 2019 Industry Days

Institutions of higher education are facing unprecedented challenges driven by internal and external forces that question the role and responsibility of educators, the value proposition of a college degree, access and inclusion, social justice and education, and political climate. In light of these forces, the 29th Ann Ferren Conference will focus on "Reimagining the Educator for the 21st Century." CTRL, in collaboration with the School of Education and Office of Campus Life, will have presentations by faculty and staff on the following topics:

 

Employment Verification

Quick and Easy Online Verification with The Work Number®

Are you moving into a new home, applying for a new job, or maybe applying for a loan? You may be asked to provide employment verification to prove your income status and that you are currently employed.

You can complete your employment verification online with The Work Number®, for a fast and secure way to provide proof of employment or income. Available to current and former employees of American University, this service simplifies the verification process and accelerates credit decision with verifiers. The Work Number is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

To provide proof of employment and/or income, provide your verifier with your social security number and American University’s employer code “18527.” Advise your verifier to visit www.theworknumber.com and register inside the verifier area. The printable worksheet for your verifier is available below.

The Work Number Verification Worksheet
For more information on the new employment verification process, visit the Employment Verifications website.

Return to top
 

Events & Announcements

Past Intergroup Dialgoue topics include:

  • Latinx Issues and Experiences
  • Politics: Post Election Impact and Climate
  • Gender, Race, and Mental Health
  • Religion: Bias and Inclusion

 

AU alum teaching in class

Designed for individuals with a bachelor's degree and interest in a teaching license, the MAT program

  • provides online and on-campus options, each requiring 5 semesters
  • offers 2 tracks: elementary or secondary education; see MAT Admissions & Requirements
  • does not require previous training or experience in education
  • offers Scholarships & Partnerships including City Year / AISGW, TEACH Grants, Ganek Family Mini-Grants
  • prepares graduates for direct entry into positions as classroom teacher, curriculum specialist, arts coordinator, adult educator, program head, and related careers

The Future of Tax Work

Join us on Thursday, May 24 at 7:00 p.m. for "A Conversation with David Kautter: The Future of Tax Work." Caroline Bruckner, managing director of the Kogod Tax Policy Center, will interview Mr, Kautter, US Treasury Assistant Secretary (Tax Policy). They will speak about the demand for tax expertise in the coming years, and the growing need for nonpartisan engagement in tax policy dialogue with policymakers, stakeholders, and the media. This is intended to be a widely-attended gathering, open to the entire American University community.

Where:

AU Center for Innovation, Room 221

When:

Thursday, May 24 from 7:00-8:30 p.m.



Parking:


Campus can be reached by DC Metro rail and bus, or by using the AU Shuttle Bus. Please park in the Nebraska Avenue Parking Lot, shown on the map above. The entrance is off Nebraska Avenue between Massachusetts Ave NW and New Mexico Ave NW.

If parking after 5pm:

Parking is free. Please use the parking surface lot on Nebraska Avenue.

Save Time and Money

Get a head start on your advanced degree with SOC's combined bachelor's/master's program and have up to six credits from your bachelor's degree count toward your master's. You may apply for admission to the program during the second semester of your junior year. Students in any undergraduate major at AU are eligible for consideration. An undergraduate degree in communication is not required.

How to Apply

When you enroll in American University’s Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program, you are taking a step toward helping to build a better society. We offer students access to cutting-edge research, innovative partnerships with educational organizations in Washington, DC, and an engaging, progressive curriculum—all to leave you equipped and eager to inspire the next generation of students to solve society’s biggest problems.

Our university’s strong political and social legacy means we’re well positioned to attract world-changing passion, encourage it, and help you channel it back into the world where it can make a difference. Our top-notch faculty consists of respected specialists and researchers who offer their graduate students innovative, evidence-based teaching techniques.

American University’s MAT program is CAEP-recognized and designed for individuals who have a bachelor’s degree and are interested in obtaining a teaching license in either elementary or secondary education (English and social studies).

Statement by the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Cuba at the High-Level Segment of the 28th Session of the Human Rights Council

By Bruno Rodríguez Parrilla (MINREX, March 2, 2015)

In accordance with its long tradition of voicing its opinion about the necessity of universal human rights, Cuba called for the rights and freedoms of poor and marginalized citizens to be upheld amidst an unequal international order that privileges developed countries. In his speech, the Minister of Foreign Affairs questioned the legitimacy of electoral systems manipulated by the media and questionable financing, expressed concern about the low unionization rates of some important western economies, and supported the "inalienable right of the Palestinian people to a state of their own," among other declarations.

Link to full text via MINREX


We’re living in a time when any of us can reach an audience of millions through social media, when facts, lies, opinions, and talking points flood our senses around the clock, and political disagreement is personal and intense. We have easier access to information than at any other time in history. It’s also easier to denigrate, threaten, and harass others than it has ever been. In media, in our homes, and in our classrooms, we’re having conversations about civility: what it means, whether it’s an outdated idea, what its limits are, and whether we can or should revive it.

Because of our unique role in expanding and challenging previously-understood ideas and teaching critical thinking, universities zealously protect freedom of speech. American University’s commitment to freedom of expression and dissent is clear and unequivocal:

The University fosters and protects freedom of expression and dissent for all members of the University community. The only limits on free expression are those dictated by law, limits necessary to protect the safety and rights of others, and limits to ensure the normal functioning of the University.

As a lawyer who has the privilege to teach a constitutional law class at the School of Public Affairs, I help students grapple with legal questions about the limitations on protected speech. Our courts have protected speech and expression most of us would never choose to engage in ourselves- from neo-Nazi demonstrations to burning the American flag.  

I’ve found that the question of what we “can” say isn’t the most interesting one in a university community or out in the world. Here at American University, we are all engaged in a mission: we seek and disseminate truth; we attempt to understand and expand humanity’s store of knowledge; we serve the public by contributing and debating ideas, and by preparing ourselves and others to learn, inquire, and contribute.  

But how? It’s up to each of us to decide how to contribute and what to take away from our experience here. It starts with two questions: What do I want for myself? What do I want from myself?

The Project on Civil Discourse was born out of the idea that we should be thinking about how we should use our voices- not only what we can say. There is no political agenda; I would be happy if, after working with this program, people think about how they speak and listen and learn in terms of their responsibilities, values, and goals. The resources we provide - including the Building My Voice tool, teaching resources, peer-led discussion workshops, and distinguished guest speakers- are just a beginning. The exciting part is the dialogue that flows from here.

-Lara Schwartz

Special thanks to AU students Meredith Mason, Isabella Dominique, and Amanda Nannarone for their work to launch this project.


Eric Hershberg   Professor and Director, Center for Latin American and Latino Studies, School of Public Affairs

Areas of Expertise: Immigration and Latinx Vote

Eric Hershberg, Professor of Government and Director of the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies, has expertise on US relations with Latin America and on Latino politics in the United State. Prof. Hershberg is available to discuss issues related to the election’s impact on Latino communities, immigration, U.S. Latin America policy relations.

Media and Publications

AU Logo

Edwina Simms
Director of Multicultural and Affinity Engagement
202-885-5930 | View Profile

Washington Semester Ambassador Lisa Surraco

Lisa Surraco American Politics

Lisa Surraco is a student ambassador interning at the Capitol Area Immigrants' Rights Coalition.

Lisa's Blog

Up and Down the Worry Hill book cover

Up and Down the Worry Hill

A children’s book about obsessive-compulsive disorder and its treatment

Wagner, A.P. & Jutton, P.A. (2004)


The thought that counts book cover

The Thought That Counts

A firsthand account of one teenager’s experience with obsessive-compulsive disorder

Kant, J. D., Franklin, M.E., & Andrews, L.W. (2008)


Blink Blink Chop Chop book cover

Blink, Blink, Clop, Clop

An OCD storybook

Moritz, E.K. (2011)


 Department Profiles

Announcements & Important Dates

Spring 2019 One Card & Dining Services Opening & Extended Hours

 

  • Saturday, January 19th 11:00 am - 3:00 pm
  • Sunday, January 20th CLOSED
  • Monday, January 21st CLOSED
  • Saturday, January 26th 11:00 am - 3:00 pm

One Card & Dining Services will resume Spring 2019 regular schedule (Mondays - Thursdays 9:00 am - 5:00 pm; Fridays 11:30 am - 5:00 pm) beginning the week of January 21st, 2019.

AU Dining Hours of Operation

Academic Year Meal Plan Timeline

  • Spring 2019 Meal Plan begins Sunday, January 13, 2019
  • Tuesday, January 29, 2019 Spring 2019 Enrollment/Change Deadline at 11:59pm EST
  • March 10- March 17 2019 Spring Break- Dining Locations Closed (no swipes; limited DD/EB)
  • May 8, 2018 Spring 2019 Meal Plan Semester ends

 

Still have questions? Send us an email at mis@american.edu

Group of men and women gather outside on a sunny day in Delhi

Delhi Workshop

December 8-9, 2016 | Observer Research Foundation

Observer Research Foundation, one of India's premier think tanks. This workshop convened researchers from India, Latin America, the US, and Europe, to address the role of religion and religious actors in the response and adaptation to emerging water-related challenges made worse by climate change. Topics encompassed glacial melt and river health, emerging agricultural challenges, connections between climate change and the increase of rural-to-urban migration, conservation efforts and stresses upon urban water systems in the global South, including freshwater and wastewater management, for which India offers important material for study. The first of a projected three regional workshops, this meeting convened researchers working on related problems of religion and climate in South Asia and Latin America to identify and refine case studies and analytic approaches to climate change, as a transboundary problem eliciting religious response.

Together with the American Center in New Delhi, CLALS also organized a public policy forum entitled "Civil Society's Role in Combating Climate Change," which followed the workshop and featured AU professors Ken Conca and Evan Berry, together with a US Embassy representative and Indian officials experienced with climate change policy. This forum considered the role of civil society in shaping policy responses to climate change, as a moral call to action, and compared the US with India, while considering how civil society might serve as a catalyst for bilateral cooperation around present and future climate challenges.

Experienced Dancers Dedicated To Your Success

AU boasts a Dance faculty with a diverse range of artistic, scholarly, and educational experience. They have worked locally, nationally, and internationally with a variety of artists and arts organizations, including Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Ballet Austin, Bill T. Jones, Bmore Houseful, Capitol Tap, Coyaba Dance Theater, Donald McKayle, GroovMekanex, Kim Robards Dance, the National Ballet Company of Peru, Talley Beatty, and Bring In Da Noise, Bring In Da Funk.

In the last year AU Dance faculty's scholarship and artistic work has led them to:

Study dance and culture in Cuba.

Present work at the International Movement and Computing Conference in London, UK.
Teach over 665 yoga classes.
Join a symposium in Vienna on contemporary dance pedagogy.
Choreograph and perform at venues like The John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts, National Museum of African American History and Culture, and Dance Place.

Read more about individual faculty members' experiences and areas of interest on the faculty profile page

Controller's Office Staff 

 Department Profiles

Living with a Roommate

Once you have found a roommate, it is vital that you discuss expectations and ground rules.

If you and your roommate(s) run into a problem that you cannot resolve on your own, you can always schedule an appointment with Student Conduct & Conflict Resolution Services.

One way to clarify responsibilities is to make a written agreement with your roommate(s). Check out AU's roommate agreement and our guide to roommate agreements. Think about and discuss the questions below.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

AU's LEED certified campus provides opportunities to practice sustainability.

An Interdisciplinary and Specialized Program

The program's interdisciplinary structure provides a multi-faceted and nuanced understanding of the field. The coursework and curriculum integrate future-oriented business education with environmental and social science, public policy, and international issues. You may also take classes in different schools on campus, offering additional opportunities for enrichment.

The MSSM is the only program in the DC metro area that is available from a business school. In conjunction with an in-depth interdisciplinary study of sustainability theories and practices, students are exposed to modern managerial techniques that are applicable to a sustainable business practices.

The MSSM curriculum focuses on:

  • Risk Assessment
  • Life Cycle
  • Lean Supply Chain
  • Firm Excellence
  • Innovation

Research Centers

Created with industry partners and guided by Advisory Board members representing leading corporations, business leaders rely on our research centers for the latest ideas on business practice and theory.

 Financial Reporting Staff

Grants and Contracts Accounting Staff

Procurement and Contracts Department Staff

University Accounting Staff

Entrance Semester
Fall and Spring
Application Deadline
January 15 for the fall semester
October 1 for the spring semester (September 15 for international applicants)
Additional Requirements
Undergraduate degree
Two letters of recommendation
Resume
Statement of Purpose
TOEFL/IELTS score if non-native English speaker
Application
Completion of online application
Entrance Semester
Fall and Spring
Application Deadline
January 15 for the fall semester
October 1 for the spring semester (September 15 for international applicants)
Additional Requirements
Undergraduate degree
Two letters of recommendation
Resume
Statement of Purpose
TOEFL/IELTS score if non-native English speaker
Application
Completion of online application

Still have questions? Send us an email: GradComm@american.edu

Students share a book.

The AU TESOL program aims to be more than just a graduate program, and believes in the importance of creating a community of learners as well as connecting our students to the expanding ESL community in the Washington, metropolitan area. Traditionally, our program has had a significant number of mature students; these include students who have taught ESL/EFL but want to gain teaching credentials, or career switchers, including CIA trainers, former military officers, lawyers, business executives, and diplomats. These days, a larger proportion of our students are graduate students who have recently completed their undergraduate degree programs.

Living the Dream: a digital story from MA TESOL graduate Maryam Bagabas.

Jack Rasmussen, Director of Art Gallery and Curator, American University Museum at the Katzen Art Center

Mario Durham, President and CEO, Association of Performing Arts Presenters

Gail Humphries Mardirosian, Dean, School of Creative and Performing Arts, Stephens College

Abel Lopez, Associate Producing Director, GALA Hispanic Theatre

Clay Lord, Vice President of Local Arts Advancement, Americans for the Arts

Bob Lynch, President and CEO, Americans for the Arts

Jennifer Cover Payne, President, Cultural Alliance of Greater Washington

Eliot Pfanstiehl, CEO, Strathmore

Mark Shugoll, CEO, Shugoll Research

Kathy Southern, Faculty, Museum Studies, Columbian College, George Washington University

Lisa Richards Toney, Director, The Abramson Scholarship Foundation

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

2013

The Creative and Cultural Industries and the Future of Latin America's Economy

November 25, 2013

Participants from across academic, policy, and practitioner communities concerned with the creative industries, as well as from the private sector, gathered for a symposium to address the relevance of Latin America's creative and cultural industries to the region's economy as a whole. The symposium consisted of two panels, the first analyzed new data for Latin America's creative industries and the second, connected data to broader trends within the region. This was the first of a series of events that aim to generate a framework for future research.

"From the Mines to the Streets: A Bolivian Activist's Life" A Conversation with Félix Muruchi

November 6, 2013

Félix Muruchi Poma is a prominent indigenous rights activist. His personal history as a miner, activist, political prisoner and exile, and most recently indigenous rights lawyer provides an extraordinary lens into Bolivian struggles for social justice. Muruchi Poma discussed the evolving nature of Bolivia's processes of social change and his new book, From the Mines to the Streets: A Bolivian Activist's Life. Discussion after the presentation was led by Professors Robert Albro and Kevin Healy.

Tinker Field Research Grant Recipient Presentations

October 23, 2013

This year's Tinker Field Research Grant recipients traveled to Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Mexico and Peru over the summer to conduct exploratory field research for their dissertation, thesis, or SRP. Three recipients, Michael Baney, Emma Fawcett, and Rachel Nadelman presented their findings and how their exploratory field research influenced their projects moving forward.

Passing as a Man: A Discussion of Gender and Identity in Cuba

October 1, 2013

Dr. Julio César González Pagés, an historian at the University of Havana, visited AU as part of the Center's ongoing Cuba Initiative. Dr. González Pagés discussed his book Por andar vestida de hombre and also touched on an innovative project on masculinities, which he coordinates. His visit builds upon CLALS-sponsored collaboration between the Washington College of Law and the University of Havana around research addressing gender and sexuality in legal practice and law school curricula.

The Cinema of Mexican Filmmaker Arturo Ripstein

September 24, 2013

Through its partnership with the Mexican Ministry of Culture, CLALS welcomed acclaimed Mexican film director Arturo Ripstein to campus on Tuesday, September 24, 2013. Maestro Ripstein discussed his career and answered questions from a panel of CAS professors, including Jeffrey Middents, Ludy Grandas, Núria Vilanova, and Brenda Werth. Over 85 people were in attendance.

Global Ramifications of the Chilean Coup: 40 Years After

September 16, 2013

To mark the 40th anniversary of the 1973 Chilean coup, CLALS and the Washington College of Law (WCL) hosted a public event on September 16 to discuss the global ramifications of the coup forty years after.

Panelists included:

Carlos Portales, Director, Program on International Organizations, Law and Diplomacy, Washington College of Law. Portales provided historical context and moderated the discussion.
Eric Hershberg, Director, Center for Latin American and Latino Studies and Professor of Government, American University. Hershberg discussed the ramifications of the coup for the political left in Spain and South America.
Barbara Stallings, William R. Rhodes Research Professor and Director, Political Economy of Development Program, Watson Institute for International Studies, Brown University. Stallings provided an analysis of how the coup affected economic development models.
Claudio Grossman, Professor of Law, Dean, and Raymond Geraldson Scholar for International and Humanitarian Law, Washington College of Law. Grossman discussed the role of the coup in the development of the international human rights regime.

The Reconfiguration of Elites and Power in Central America

June 3, 2013

Selected findings of an ambitious two-year research project analyzing the composition and role of Central American elites were discussed across two panels: one assessing changes in the make-up and interests of elite groups in light of shifts in the economic order in Central America and the second focusing on how elites today interact with and influence the economic, political, and social orders. Special attention was paid to the role of elites in shaping state finances and in responding to elected governments identified with the left. The discussion assessed implications of project findings for U.S. foreign policy in the core countries of the isthmus.

This event was co-sponsored by and held at the Washington Office on Latin America.

2013 LASA Congress: CLALS Project-Sponsored Panels

May 29-June 1, 2013

CLALS projects sponsored five panels at LASA's 2013 Congress: The Reconfiguration of Elites and Power in Central America, Fiscal Policy and Elite-State Interactions in Contemporary Central America, Religion and Violence in Central America, Re-thinking Catholic Responses to Human Rights, and Hemisphere in Flux: New Roles, New Institutions, and New Agendas in Inter-American Relations.

Migration, Identity, and U.S.-Mexican Relations

April 29, 2013

CLALS and SPA hosted a panel discussion honoring the recipients of the inaugural William M. LeoGrande Prize for the best book on U.S.-Latin American relations, and the William M. LeoGrande Award for the best book or article on Latin America or Latinos published by an AU community member. Panelists included Alexandra Délano of The New School, Todd Eisenstadt of SPA, and José Ángel Hernández of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Mexico's Future: In Search of a New Democratic Equilibrium

April 1-2, 2013

This two-day symposium brought together a diverse group of leading international scholars with the objective of challenging conventional thinking about Mexico's future. Mexico continues to make decisions and govern in ways inherited from its authoritarian past. Panels addressed what a new democratic equilibrium would look like, and what key levers for intervention (policies, reforms, coalitions, movements etc.) might move the country in the right direction.

This event was co-organized by CLALS and the Institute for Legal Research of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (IIJ-UNAM) in Mexico City.

One Year after the Gang Truce in El Salvador: Challenges and Opportunities

March 29, 2013

This panel discussion focused on the political context and implications of the gang truce in El Salvador, what role the Catholic Church or actors within the Church have played in launching or sustaining the truce, and what opportunities the truce may provide for implementing long-term programs for communities most affected by violence. The panel also addressed the outcomes of previous gang truces in the Caribbean and the U.S. Panelists included CLALS Research Fellows, Héctor Silva Ávalos and Steven Dudley; AU Professor, Ed Maguire; and social development specialist at the World Bank, Alys Willman. The discussion was moderated by WOLA's Program Director, Geoff Thale.

This event was co-organized by CLALS and the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA). Watch a recording of the event.

Book Presentation: Globalization and Austerity Politics in Latin America by Stephen B. Kaplan

February 27, 2013

Globalization and Austerity Politics in Latin America examines how relations between international creditors and national debtors affect economic policy changes. The book also evaluates the role of technocratic advisors on government choices, showing how severe economic shocks have a transformative effect on policy. Beyond Latin America's borders, the book offers important lessons for understanding the ongoing economic crises in the U.S. and Europe, as well as the politics of reform in developing democracies.

Presentation and Discussion with Ambassador Altschul

February 12, 2013

His Excellency Francisco Altschul, Ambassador of El Salvador, spoke to an audience of 50 AU and DC community members about immigration reforms that are of great importance to Salvadoran citizens. Salvadorans make up the largest percentage of 300,000 Central Americans legally residing in the U.S. under Temporary Protected Status (TPS). TPS was first extended to citizens of Nicaragua and Honduras due to the devastation caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, and was extended to Salvadorans in 2001 after a series of destructive earthquakes. Officials in the region are interested in the normalization of the 300,000 Latinos under TPS, some of whom have resided in the U.S. for over 15 years.

TPS status needs to be renewed every 18 months. Ambassador Altschul noted that Salvadorans alone have paid $600 million to the U.S. government in registration fees.

Lecture by Mexican Author Élmer Mendoza

January 31, 2013

As part of an agreement between AU and the Mexican National Council for Culture and the Arts (CONACULTA), CLALS welcomed Mexican playwright, storyteller, novelist and Sinaloa native Élmer Mendoza who delivered a lecture on his work. Winner of the 2007 Tusquets Award for his novel Balas de plata, Mendoza is widely considered the foremost figure in the new crime fiction genre known as "narcoliterature." AU faculty participated with Mendoza in a panel discussion following his address.

Impacts of Parental Deportation on U.S. Citizen Youth of Salvadoran Origin

January 30, 2013

A CLALS research team presented an in-progress NIH proposal that aims to examine the social and health ramifications produced by the rising rate of deportations which disproportionately affect Latino communities. The presentation was part of the CHRS seminar series.

Workshop: Religious Responses to Violence

January 14-15, 2013

In mid-January 2013 CLALS convened a workshop at AU to present initial research findings from its project studying Religious Responses to Violence in Latin America. A moderated discussion open to the public was held on Tuesday, January 15.

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DC Victim Hotline: 1-844-4HELPDC (443-5732)

Grief Recovery Helpline: 1-800-445-4808

IMAlive Crisis Chat: www.IMAlive.org

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) 

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Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-784-2433

Are you a young person of Color? Text "STEVE" to 741-741

The Trevor Project "Saving Young LGBTQ Lives": 1-866-488-7386

Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255 (Press 1)/ Text to: 838255

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Client Configuration

NOTE: These settings will be saved for future sessions, so you only need to set them once. Once the client is installed and configured simply re-launch the program when you need to connect again.

1. Launch the VMware client from the Applications folder.

2. Click the "New Server" button.

Step 2: New Server

3. Enter vcl.american.edu in the "Connection server" field and click "Connect."

Step 3: Connection Server

4. When prompted for your credentials, enter your AU username and password.

Step 4: Login

5. You will then be prompted to enter your DUO two-factor secondary password. (For information about setting up DUO, follow the instructions at the DUO enrollment website)

6. After successful login, you will see the list of desktop pools available to you. Before launching a virtual desktop, use the following steps to allow the client to connect to your local hard drives or USB devices.

7. From the OSX tool bar at the top of the screen, click on "VMware Horizon Client" and then "Preferences."

Step 6: Client Preferences

8. Click on the "Sharing" tab.

9. Check all of the options, and then close the configuration window.

Step 8: Sharing Options

10. You can now double-click the icon for the desktop pool you wish to launch.

Step 9: Desktop Pools

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Please contact our Washington Semester Recruiter below if you would like to:

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Our Vision

We envision the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience as an externally-funded and self-sustaining center that integrates psychology, biology, neuroanatomy, and physiology with chemistry, physics and mathematics to advance understanding of the cognitive, emotional, sensory, and regulatory functions that underlie the behavior of both humans and animals. The center will bring together experts from these and other disciplines in a setting where students, faculty, and other research professionals work collaboratively to generate new ideas, methods, and concepts.

 



Directions to Campus

Hourly parking is available in the garage under the Katzen Art Center. Campus can be reached by DC Metro rail and bus, or by using the AU Shuttle Bus.




2014

Unaccompanied Migrant Children from Central America: Report Presentation

December 4, 2014

CLALS researchers presented findings from a Center study exploring the factors behind the migration of Central American children and families from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. The report is part of a Ford Foundation-supported initiative to inform advocates and practitioners working on behalf of these new arrivals, and focuses on three key topics:

  • The unprecedented expansion in the number of youth and family border crossings in the context of long-term migration trends from the region;
  • The country conditions ("push factors") driving the exodus of Central American minors and families; and
  • The new arrivals' prospects for remaining in the U.S. in light of available forms of deportation relief as well as current policy and advocacy responses.

Over 65 guests were in attendance, including representatives from several Central American embassies, Amnesty International, and D.C.-based immigrant advocacy organizations.

Emerging Directions in Latino Studies: A Panel Discussion

November 14, 2014

CLALS and the College of Arts and Sciences joined students, staff and faculty at a panel discussion on emerging directions in Latino Studies. An interactive Q&A session and reception followed presentations by three distinguished panelists:

  • Ali Valenzuela, Department of Politics, Princeton University;
  • Lázaro Lima, Department of American Studies and Department of Latin American & Iberian Studies, University of Richmond; and
  • Patricia Foxen, Department of Research, National Council on La Raza (NCLR).

Social Justice Movements: Religion, Sex, and Nature in Latin America

November 7, 2014

The panel discussion featured U.S. and Latin American experts and addressed religious engagement with two sets of contentious issues across the region: environmental justice, climate change, and the exploitation of natural resources, on the one hand, and gender, women's reproductive rights, and sexual identity rights, on the other. Moderated by American University professors Evan Berry and Macarena Sáez, the panel explored religious responses to questions of the environment and gender as well as religion's role in regional contestation around these questions. This event was part of a two-year CLALS project on Religion and Democratic Contestation in Latin America, generously funded by the Henry R. Luce Foundation's Initiative on Religion and International Affairs.

Back Channel To Cuba: A Conversation

November 4, 2014

CLALS Faculty Affiliate William LeoGrande and Peter Kornbluh talked about their new book chronicling the untold history of attempts at rapprochement and reconciliation between the United States and Cuba. From John F. Kennedy's offering of an olive branch to Fidel Castro after the missile crisis, to Henry Kissinger's top secret quest for normalization, to Barack Obama's promise of a "new approach," LeoGrande and Kornbluh revealed a fifty-year record of dialogue and negotiations, both open and furtive, indicating a path toward better relations in the future.

Unaccompanied Migrant Children from Central America: Context, Causes, & Advocacy Responses

September 22, 2014

As part of the Center's Ford Foundation-supported initiative aimed at informing advocates engaged in protecting the rights and welfare of unaccompanied minors from Central America, CLALS Director Eric Hershberg and Program Manager Dennis Stinchcomb presented an overview of the factors driving the recent wave of children and families from the region to an audience of over 50 advocates, social workers, and lawyers. Particular attention was paid to those contextual push factors that could be used as the basis for seeking deportation relief. CLALS staff were joined by WCL Professor Jayesh Rathod, who discussed U.S. jurisprudence on gang-based asylum claims and the state of due process and right-to-counsel litigation for unaccompanied minors.

In this effort, CLALS partnered with The Door, a NYC-based youth development agency at the forefront of advocating for unaccompanied migrant children in the metropolitan area.

Writing Isn't Solitude: Cristina Rivera Garza

September 17, 2014

Through its partnership with the Mexican Ministry of Culture, CLALS was pleased to welcome award-winning author Cristina Rivera Garza for a panel discussion on the place of writing and community in the context of contemporary violence. She was joined by Professor Jeff Middents from the Department of Literature and by Professors Núria Vilanova and Brenda Werth from the Department of World Languages and Cultures. More than 50 guests were in attendance.

Cuba, the 2015 Americas Summit, and Beyond: Obstacles and Opportunities

September 4, 2014

On the threshold of the 2015 Presidential Summit in Panama, a group of distinguished scholars, diplomats and practitioners gathered in Ottawa on September 4 to discuss the much-debated participation of Cuba in the upcoming OAS assembly. Sponsored by the University of Ottawa, American University, the Coordinadora Regional de Investigaciones Economicas y Sociales and the Latin America Study Group of the Canadian International Council, with funding from the Christopher Reynolds Foundation, the discussion analyzed past and present U.S.-Cuba relations in the context of an increasingly multipolar hemisphere and examined ways in which third-party stakeholders like Canada might encourage policy change to benefit long-term inter-American dynamics.

Book Launch and Discussion: Police and Organized Crime in El Salvador

May 19, 2014

The infiltration of public institutions in Central America by organized criminal groups is a critical issue that has posed an increasing risk to democracy and the rule of law in various parts of the region over the last decade. This is among the many challenges awaiting the new administration in El Salvador that begins on June 1st.

A new book by Salvadoran journalist, former diplomat, and CLALS Senior Fellow Héctor Silva Ávalos illuminates a particular aspect of this problem. Silva shared the main findings of Infiltrators: A Chronicle of Corruption in the National Civil Police of El Salvador. The book's findings are based on archival and field research supported by a grant from the Open Society Foundations.

We were delighted that Congressman Jim McGovern (D-MA), who has a longstanding interest in human rights and El Salvador's political process during the past three decades, and Steven Dudley, Co-Director of InSight Crime, provided commentary on Silva's book, which was available for purchase at the session. A wide-ranging conversation followed opening comments.

A Conversation with the President of Uruguay

May 13, 2014

American University was honored to welcome Uruguayan President José Mujica to campus.

Creative and Cultural Industries Symposium

May 9, 2014

On May 9, 2014 the Broward County Cultural Division convened a panel discussion on the contribution of creativity as a key element of economic and social development in Latin America and the Caribbean. The panel was comprised of members from the Inter-American Development Bank's Culture, Creativity, and Solidarity Affairs Division and from CLALS, including Director Eric Hershberg, Research Associate Professor Robert Albro, and Faculty Affiliates Andrew Taylor and Ximena Varela. Read more about the Center's Project on Creative and Cultural Industries in Latin America.

Contemporary Mexican Literature: Mario Bellatin

April 16, 2014

Through its partnership with the Mexican Ministry of Culture, CLALS was pleased to welcome acclaimed novelist Mario Bellatin for a panel discussion on contemporary Mexican literature. He was joined by panelists Yuri Herrera, also a distinguished Mexican author, and Professors Ana Serra and Juliana Martínez from the Department of World Languages and Cultures. The event was held in Spanish with 90 people in attendance.

Élites, Estados y Reconfiguraciones del Poder en Centroamérica

April 9, 2014

As part of its multi-year project on the Reconfiguration of Elites and Power in Central America, CLALS convened a panel discussion to present project findings in San Salvador, El Salvador. Panelists discussed the principal changes and continuities in elite configurations and identified the mechanisms through which elites are currently engaging the economic, political, and social orders throughout the Central American isthmus. Based on project conclusions, panelists reflected on how these new elite configurations and the ways in which they wield their power impact issues of democratic governance for new and incoming administrations in El Salvador, Honduras, and Costa Rica. Over 120 people were in attendance.

Panelists included:

Eric Hershberg, Director of the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies at American University
Benedicte Bull, Associate Professor at the Center for Development and the Environment (SUM) at the University of Oslo
Ricardo Barrientos, Senior Economist and specialist in fiscal policy at the Central American Institute for Fiscal Studies (Icefi)
Hugo Noé Pino, Economist of Honduras at the Central American Institute for Fiscal Studies (Icefi)

The Republicans' Latino Problem and How It Can Be Fixed

March 7, 2014

CLALS convened two panels of experts to discuss the future of Latino voters' relationship with the Republican Party. The first panel addressed the main issues complicating Latino support of the GOP, and the second panel presented how the party might seek to connect with Latino voters. Academics, analysts, and political strategists included Jason Casellas, Eric Hershberg, Sylvia Manzano, Ali Valenzuela, Jordan Fabian, Glen Bolger, Leslie Sanchez, and David Winston.

C-SPAN video coverage of Panel 1 and Panel 2

Religion and Justice in Latin America Today

February 28, 2014

Scholars from the U.S. and Latin America gathered for a panel discussion about the engagement between religious actors in Latin American democracies and contentious issues of environmental justice, the exploitation of natural resources, and gender and sexuality-based rights.

A 20 años del Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte: viejos problemas nuevos desafíos

January 23-24, 2014

Scholars gathered in Mexico City for a two-day conference exploring the past and future challenges of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), twenty years after its implementation. This conference was sponsored by the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and co-sponsored by CLALS.

February 7, 11:15 a.m. - 1:15 p.m., SIS, make your own trail mix

February 14, 11:15 a.m. - 1:15 p.m., SIS, make a recycled Valentine

March 7, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m., The Bridge Cafe: Trivia night to test your knowledge of trash. Free drinks from the Bridge while supplies last!

Research Interests

Early and Modern American History: Immigration and Ethnic History

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Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
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Professor Isaiah Wooden -CAS-Performing Arts

Why I Wanted to Teach This Class

The courses that I am most excited to teach are those that synthesize and interrogate questions of identity, representation, and performance and that integrate critical and creative inquiry. I am especially eager to explore what it means to think through difference with students in the course and look forward to carrying out our examinations and analyses using multiple disciplinary perspectives.

Fun Fact

I, like so many others, thoroughly enjoy the musical Hamilton and have, to date, been in "the room where it happens" five times.

To Contact Professor Wooden

Email: wooden@american.edu

Still have questions? Send us an email: GradComm@american.edu.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

  • Stephen D. Cohen
  • Joshua Goldstein
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  • Vadim Medish
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  • Gain the skills you need. Go on site visits, listen to guest speakers and network at events. 
  • Work with world-class faculty. Study with seasoned practitioners, many of whom are employed at leading national firms.

2019 Global Education Forum

Spring 2019 Panelists
Global extremism and education

Innovation and Inclusion in Latin America:
Strategies to Avoid the Middle Income Trap

(Palgrave Macmillan, 2016)

Edited by Alejandro Foxley and Barbara Stallings

From the Emergent Challenges for Latin American and Caribbean Economies project

William Erickson

WMP 2009/AU 2013
La Jolla, CA

Beeta Rafiekian

WMP 2006/AU 2010
Potomac, MD

CLALS presents project findings to scholarly, policy, and practitioner communities through varying types of print publications, including edited volumes, special edition journals, short-form reports, and policy briefs. The products listed below are in addition to the Center's Working Paper Series, which facilitates timely presentation of ongoing research.

Scholarly Works | Reports

Scholarly Works


Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.


Richard Semiatin Assistant Professor, School of Professional & Extended Studies

Areas of Expertise: Campaigns, polls and voting issues; elections; Congress; the executive branch; courts; and federal and state child-support enforcement

Richard J. Semiatin, assistant professor of political science, has taught courses in American politics and government for AU’s Washington Semester Program since 1991. He specializes in elections, campaigns, Congress, the executive branch, courts, and federal and state child-support enforcement. Semiatin is editor and author of the book Campaigns on the Cutting Edge, which appeared in its second edition (CQ Press, 2012)

Media and Publications

AU Logo

Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

Todd Sloan

Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

Big World Small Planet: Abundance within Planetary Boundaries

April 

Big World Small Planet: Abundance Within Planetary Boundaries by Johan Rockstrom and Mattias Klum

April 19, Noon-1 p.m.

McKinley 102

Half-Earth: Our Planet's Fight for Life

March

Half-Earth: Our Planet's Fight for Life by Edward O. Wilson

March 22, Noon-1 p.m.

McKinley 102

Holiday Closure: The Katzen Arts Center will be closed for the holidays, December 23 through January 15, 2018.


Faculty Fellows


Spring

  • BIO-32x elective (3-4ch)
  • BIO-32x elective (3-4ch)
  • PHYS-205 Physics II (4ch)
  • Elective (3ch) or BIO-498H (3ch)
  • Elective (3ch)
  • Total: 16-17ch

FALL

  • BIO-499 Senior Seminar (3ch) – capstone
  • BIO-32x elective (3-4ch) or BIO-497H (3ch)
  • PHYS-105 Physics I (4ch)
  • Elective (3ch) or BIO-32x elective (3ch)
  • Elective (3ch)
  • Total: 16-17ch
Student's work with local business to develop branding campaigns.

Get the real-world experience you need

The Applied Client Project is the highlight of the program and guaranteed to give you real-world experience.

You'll work with RedPeg Marketing, a local events marketing firm, to lead a full-scale campaign, including market research, strategic planning, creative implementation, and the evaluation of campaign results.

The project includes regular meetings with RedPeg, and the MSMKTG program director, providing you with professional mentorship each step of the way. The Applied Client Project culminates with a final presentation at RedPeg's headquarters, offering you the chance to flex your presentation skills in front of real-world professionals.


For additional resources, please contact Lara Schwartz at lschwart@american.edu.

Equal Employment

Celebrating Women, Men & U.S. Politics: 10 Big Questions

wpi graduation festivities 

Saturday, April 28, 2018

The Women & Politics Institute celebrated this year's Women, Policy, and Political Leadership Certificate recipients and WeLead Program graduates. The event also honored the 2017-2018 Alice Paul Award Winners: Jennifer Palmieri (Alumna Recipient), Amanda Fuchs Miller (Faculty Recipient), Rachel Kershaw (Graduate Student Recipient) and Mary-Margaret Koch(Undergraduate Student Recipient).

Throughout the history of American University, the College of Arts and Sciences has changed its name several times. At first known as the "College of Liberal Arts," the name was changed to the "College of Arts and Sciences" in 1939. For a brief period it was known simply as the "Undergraduate College" until the name was converted back to the "College of Arts and Sciences" in 1956.

GRE 8 Week Wednesday Session

TPR-050-001
January 30 - March 27
Wednesday Evening, 6:00-9:00pm
Optional Practice Exam/Q&A March 31
Register

GRE 6 Week Tues./Thurs. Session

TPR-050-004
February 19 - April 4
Tues and Th Evenings, 6:00-8:00pm
Optional Practice Exam/Q&A April 7
Register

Spring

  • AuX 2 (1.5ch)
  • D elective (3ch)
  • BIO-210 General Biology II (4ch)
  • College Writing II (3ch)
  • Math (4ch) or elective (3ch)
  • Total: 14.5-15.5ch
Helping Your Anxious Child book cover

Helping Your Anxious Child

A step-by-step guide for parents

Rapee, R. Spence, S. Cobham, V., & Wignall, A. (2008)

Growing Up Brave book cover

Growing Up Brave

Expert strategies for helping your child overcome fear, stress, and anxiety

Pincus, D.B. (2012)

Spring

  • BIO-356 Genetics (5ch)
  • CHEM-210 General Chemistry II (4ch)
  • HoM (3ch)
  • Elective (3ch)
  • Total: 15ch
The Coping Cat Book Cover

The Coping Cat

Parent companion

Kendall, P.C., Podell, J., & Gosch, E. (2010)

Students may choose a concentration in public history in conjunction with the MA in history or as an outside field for the PhD. The public history concentration for the MA requires 9 hours of core course work, 9 hours of required course work, plus research seminars and elective courses.

A two-course seminar-practicum series is taken in the first
year of study (6 hours). The graduate seminar gives students
a historical and theoretical context for their work and covers
some of the dominant paradigms in the field of public history. The graduate practicum meets in a seminar format and builds professional knowledge and skills in governance, development and grant writing, public outreach, and various interpretive tools. This course requires students to complete class projects at public institutions.

Other required courses expand skills students need to be a
professional historian, teach the historiography of certain eras, provide experience with tools of research, and allow students to create their own schedule according to their interests and what they want to pursue.

Please see complete MA degree requirements.

AU Memo Letterhead

February 27, 2018

To:
American University Community
From:
Fanta Aw, Vice President of Campus Life
Re:
Postering by Off Campus Groups

You may have heard about anti-Israel, anti-Jewish posters placed on campus early this morning. We condemn these cowardly acts by outside groups who are targeting college campuses like ours. While we don’t know that the groups who have postered on our campus in recent months are related, their messages are offensive, and they are the antithesis of what we represent. We do believe they are targeting AU because of our values.

I want to take this the opportunity to provide some context for the university’s actions and share our process for how we are addressing acts by alt right groups targeting our campus.

AU Police has implemented additional proactive measures for incidents on our campus. Our process to handle these instances is informed by the fact that there has been increased activity from alt right groups on college campuses. There have been many news reports that this has been occurring around the country and a recent report from the Anti-Defamation League specifically about anti-Semitic incidents particularly on college campuses.

Part of our response is to not give these groups attention, which is what they want, and we want you to know we are being as proactive as we possibly can. Our proactive stance includes a strong AU Police approach, surveillance, immediate response, identification of people who should not be on our campus, informing those people this is private property, and barring those people from campus and/or arresting as appropriate. Any individuals who we previously barred are subject to arrest should they return.

As I have said before, as an institution we stand against racism, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, and anti-immigration. We believe in human dignity, equal rights for all and preservation of free expression. This sadly continues to make American University a target for acts of cowardice and bigotry that are disturbingly global. We will stand together strongly against these acts that are intended to frighten and divide our community. They will not divide us.

We understand the anxiety that this may cause. I remind all of you of the counseling resources we have available including the AU Counseling Center in room 214 of the Mary Graydon Center (202-885-3500), the Dean of Students (202-885-3300), and the Kay Spiritual Life Center (202) 885- 3320. Faculty and staff are also encouraged to contact the Faculty Staff Assistance program.

AU Logo

Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

AU Logo

Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

AU Logo

Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

Important Plan Information

Contract Number:  4103
Customer Service:  (301) 468-6000
Website: www.kaiserpermanente.org


Core Concentration


Supplementary Concentration

Gateway Courses

Freeing your child from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder book cover.

Freeing Your Child from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

A powerful, practical program for parents of children and adolescents

Chansky, T. (2001)


Freshmen Year

Fall

  • AuX 1 (1.5ch)
  • Complex Problems (3ch)
  • BIO-110 General Biology I (4ch)
  • College Writing I (3ch) – W1
  • Math (4ch) – Q1

Total: 15.5ch

Sophmore Year

Fall

  • BIO-320 Cell Biology (4ch)
  • CHEM-110 General Chemistry I (4ch) – HoM
  • W2 elective (3ch)
  • HoM (3ch) or elective (3ch)

Total: 14ch

Sophmore Year

Year 3

  • Health Communication (HLTH 441)
  • Health Policy (HLTH 470)
  • Public Health Capstone (HLTH 480)
  • Global Health or Health Development(SISU 358) or Health & Development (SISU 349)
  • +3 electives

 

Research interests

  • Extractive industries and conflict, countering violent extremism, localizing peace, art and post-war healing

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nullam eget libero tortor. Integer sagittis hendrerit fringilla. Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Mauris sit amet erat interdum, ultricies diam eget, sodales velit.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Proin ac suscipit sapien. Aliquam vitae finibus arcu. Maecenas eu ex sit amet risus pharetra feugiat ac sed augue. Praesent mollis tellus eu enim ornare, nec convallis massa efficitur. Phasellus feugiat malesuada diam. Ut non arcu et libero maximus sollicitudin. Sed sagittis lectus in felis placerat ultricies. Aenean id ornare tortor. Suspendisse in dictum dui, a vulputate nisl. Maecenas luctus ligula at luctus iaculis.

Program Director

Research interests

  • Political economy of development
  • Urban inequality and environmental justice
  • Water and land governance in Bangalore/Bengaluru in India

Research interests

  • Bureaucracies of international aid projects
  • Sustainable fishery programs and the relationship between NGOs and coffee cooperatives in the Dominican Republic 
  • Vetiver perfume industry and soil conservation/reforestation efforts in Haiti

The BS in Biology offers a challenging curriculum that successfully prepares students for graduate school, professional (medical, dental, etc.) school, or research positions in industry. Interdisciplinary course work includes courses in Chemistry, Physics, and Statistics and readies students for the diversity of upper-level Biology courses taught by our faculty experts. Biology majors acquire a thorough, competitive background in biological science and are encouraged to obtain valuable research experience working one-on-one with faculty mentors in research labs on campus, to participate in study abroad and off-campus internships, and to gain teaching experience as student instructors.

Our faculty's distinguished careers include roles within the Department of Education, consulting assignments on the Obama administration’s Reach Higher Initiative, and many other prestigious and influential positions within the field of education. They are not only exemplary instructors but also thinkers, innovators, and researchers who are helping to shape the future of education. Whether you enroll in our online or on-campus format, you can look forward to developing important and lasting mentor relationships with the professors you'll meet here. 

See more about the Teacher Education Faculty.

Frequently Asked Questions

How many course am I required to take during the summer?

  • Students will complete two courses during the summer program. Many students take a mathematics course, depending on availability and placement scores. Students will work with their academic advisor to register for courses.

What is the College Writing Seminar?

  • STEP students will also take a mandatory college writing seminar. This class is a crucial bridge between high school and college-level writing. It is a supplement to the two-course College Writing sequence that all incoming freshmen students at AU must take in order to meet the university writing requirements.

The BS in Biology offers a challenging curriculum that successfully prepares students for graduate school, professional (medical, dental, etc.) school, or research positions in industry. Interdisciplinary course work includes courses in Chemistry, Physics, and Statistics and readies students for the diversity of upper-level Biology courses taught by our faculty experts. Biology majors acquire a thorough, competitive background in biological science and are encouraged to obtain valuable research experience working one-on-one with faculty mentors in research labs on campus, to participate in study abroad and off-campus internships, and to gain teaching experience as student instructors.

Center for Community Engagement and Service

Center for Diversity and Inclusion

Kay Spiritual Life Center

University Center and Student Activities

Your input and suggestions are encouraged. I look forward to hearing from you.

Volunteer with the Career Center

If you'd like to get involved with helping current students find jobs and internships, mentoring, or giving career advice, we'd love to have you as a volunteer. Contact Charley Fogel with any questions or to become a Career Center volunteer.

Earn $4.00 off fines for:

  • Granola or cereal bars, 6ct or larger
  • Single-serving healthy snacks, 8ct or larger
  • Peanut butter (no hydrogenated oils/trans fats), almond butter, sunflower seed butter, 18oz or larger
Historical bridge over blue river in Bosnia and Herzegovina overlooking the city

SIS Community Pick

"Bathed in Light" by Sarah Ampolsk
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina; 2015

This photograph showcases Mostar's famous 16th century Ottoman bridge, Stari Most, which was destroyed during the 1990's war and rebuilt after the conflict. To me, the bridge is symbolic of the beauty and resilience of Bosnia and Herzegovina and its people.

Earn $1.00 off fines for:

  • Canned vegetables (low sodium, no salt added) 8oz or larger
  • Canned black beans, lentils, chili 8oz or larger
  • Canned/boxed soup 8oz or larger
  • Canned tuna or salmon 6oz or larger
  • Rice 32 oz bag or larger
  • Boxed mac and cheese, 7.25 oz or larger
  • Boxed pasta
  • Canned/boxed tomatoes, tomato sauce
  • Soy milk, almond milk (boxed non-refrigerated), 8oz or larger
Kissing Doorknobs book cover

Kissing Doorknobs

 

Hesser, T.S. & Allen, A.J. (1999)


Wilma Jean the Worry Machine book cover

Wilma Jean the Worry Machine

 

Cook, J., & DuFalla, A. (2012)


Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Emily Roseman

WMP 2008/AU 2012
Fairfield, CT

Exhibition Overview

This exhibition features 60 photographic prints of scenes from two communist nations, North Korea and Cuba, by Belgian photographer Carl De Keyzer. The Cuba photos, grouped together under the series title Cuba, la lucha, were taken shortly after former President Barack Obama's 2014 speech inviting the relaxation of the Communist island's 56-year embargo. The North Korean prints, which will be shown in conjunction with Cuba, la lucha for the first time, were shot in 2015 when the artist spent more than 40 nights in North Korea with the British-run Koryo Group. During this time, De Keyzer traveled and documented each province in the country.

De Keyzer is a globally renowned photographer and member of Magnum Photos, an international photographic collective, and the recipient of 17 international awards. The photographs in this exhibition powerfully capture the struggles and the leisure of everyday Cubans and North Koreans in uncommon scenes.
 

Related Events

June 17
Gallery Talk: States of Mind

 

Press

The Art Newspaper: North Korea Gives Up Its Secrets Right in the Heart of Washington

You can welcome new Title IX staff members, Regina Curran and Fariha Quasem, during Title IX Tuesdays this fall in The Bridge.

Our Campus Community

Our campus's focus on diversity is our strength. You'll meet people with life stories different from your own. You'll hear new ideas. You'll challenge some of your own preconceived notions. You'll learn from each other, and together, you'll find solutions that are better than if you had pursued them alone. Yet, this inclusion takes effort to protect and maintain.

So here are a few ways we're building a safer, more inclusive community:

Improved Title IX Process

Title IX covers all reports of sex- and gender-based discrimination, including sexual assault, rape, stalking, sexual exploitation, dating and domestic violence, and sexual harassment.

Whenever we receive a report about a student accused of committing one of these behaviors, we will resolve it through a new, streamlined process effective August 1. A trained investigator will assess all relevant information and make a finding of responsibility based on a preponderance of the evidence.

We're making this change from the hearing model we used before because the new model is more student-centered and allows for a more timely resolution of cases. You can find information on the new investigation process at www.american.edu/titleix under "Title IX Complaint Protocol-Student Complaints Against Students."

We also have two new staff members joining the Title IX Office: Regina Curran and Fariha Quasem. You can welcome them at Title IX Tuesdays this fall in The Bridge.

Feel free to contact the Title IX Office at titleix@american.edu or Butler Pavilion, fourth floor (Office of Campus Life) with your questions.

Attention to Diversity and Inclusion

This summer I've spent time speaking with students, faculty, and staff about where our campus is today, and what steps we can take to align this special community with our ideals. In July, I shared some of what I've learned and the progress we've made.

Among the changes are a new diversity and inclusion website, an assessment of the AUx2 pilot course on race, identity, and inclusion, and an Anti-Defamation League briefing on bias incidents and hate crimes that led off summer training. We've also hired Dr. Makeba Clay, who will consult with us on a new plan based on a model of inclusive excellence. More measures of progress are below.

Please share your thoughts or ideas about our work to create a more diverse and inclusive community at DICouncil@american.edu.

Welcoming New Faculty Members

We've made some early significant progress welcoming new faculty from diverse backgrounds over one year of hiring. Incoming tenure-line faculty are 44 percent self-identified people of color, with slightly more than one of every four self-identifying as black or African American. Yet, it will take a sustained effort over years to increase the overall representation of faculty of color.

Among the many we're welcoming this fall, I wanted to highlight two: Dr. Ibram Kendi, professor of history and international relations, and Dr. Kareem Jordan, associate professor of justice, law, and criminology. The youngest scholar ever to win the National Book Award for non-fiction, Dr. Kendi will establish the Anti-Racism Research and Policy Center. Dr. Jordan's deep scholarship on race/ethnicity and criminal justice issues will help his collaboration with local and state criminal justice/social service agencies.

Update on Hate Crime Investigation

The investigation into the racist hate crime that occurred on our campus in early May is active and ongoing. The AU Police Department (AUPD) continues to work collaboratively with law enforcement partners at the FBI and the US Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia. AUPD briefs me frequently and regularly on the status of the investigation.

I want to thank everyone who provided information through our tip line. AUPD has followed up on those tips and continues to conduct interviews. If you were near Letts Anderson Quad, Mary Graydon Center, or McKinley Hall around 4 a.m. on May 1, 2017, and have recollections or information to share, go to the Public Safety Tip Line or call 202-885-2999.

Charlottesville and Campus Safety

The tragic, violent events in Charlottesville, Virginia, remind us that those values we cherish, including diversity, inclusion, mutual respect, and freedom of expression, must be carefully protected, especially from those who would use violence and fear as weapons.

Hate, bigotry, and violence are not American values. We reject them.

The racism and anti-Semitism expressed by white supremacists should be condemned by all corners of American society.

Guided by our values, AU embraces practices that unite, include, and promote greater understanding and reject those that divide, exclude, harm, and encourage discord.

AU is our community, and we have taken extra efforts to protect it. These actions include

  • reviewing and improving our protocols for responding to bias incidents and hate crimes and managing demonstrations to protect both free expression and participants' safety
  • responding to and communicating more efficiently during emergencies by moving the AUPD and risk management office into the Don Myers Technology and Innovation Building, now home to the university's new Emergency Operations Center (EOC)
  • providing 600 campus security cameras, alarms, blue phones, access and access control, and the Rave Guardian app that helps you alert family and friends if you're walking alone
  • taking emergency and non-emergency calls through our communications center and sending emergency alerts
  • adding police radios and cameras to AU shuttle buses
The new East Campus is home to a technology and innovation building, more meeting rooms, and the emergency operations center.

Improving the Student Experience

Open communication is great, but if it's going to be truly effective, we need to act on what we hear. A number of the actions that we are taking to enhance the student experience come from a campus-wide effort called RiSE (Reinventing the Student Experience):

Eliminating Lab and Course Fees

Students can now take required and elective courses without paying any additional course/lab fees. The new policy does have a few exceptions, like travel courses (study abroad, out-of-state, or AU Scholars) and certification courses.

Creating New Spaces

The new Don Myers Technology and Innovation Building on East Campus is home to more than 70 faculty and staff, including the departments of Computer Science, Physics, and Mathematics-Statistics; the AU Game Lab; the AU Center for Innovation; and the Collaboration Lab. Its 14,000 square feet of instructional space includes ten new rooms ranging from seminar spaces to large classrooms for sixty students. The building is a place to study the creative and practical potential of play, turn innovations into entrepreneurial ventures, and make prototypes. STEAM Works, our new makerspace, is equipped with everything from laser cutters to 3D printers to sewing machines.

With East Campus, the university has added many new meeting spaces. Constitution Hall's first floor has more than 3,200 square feet of new meeting and event space that seats up to 300 people, theater style. Congressional Hall has four new conference rooms that seat eight to eighteen people. You can email conferences@american.edu to reserve the meeting spaces from University Conferences and Guest Services, or visit their offices on the first floor of Congressional Hall. While you are there, I invite you to take advantage of the benches and gardens that are part of new campus's beautiful landscapes.

The Bridge in Mary Graydon Center is a new social and study space with refreshments and expanded hours. It is a place to relax and have fun and will feature trivia nights, open mics, and other small performances and events to entertain you. We expect it to open on September 8. Just outside the Bridge will be lots of new furniture and power outlets, where you can hang out, study, and visit with friends.

Restructuring for Efficiency

It's never easy as a student to have offices spread all across campus, nor is it easy as a staff member to serve students efficiently if you have to work with a department on the other side of campus. That's why we have just created a new Center for Undergraduate Experience, located on the first floor of Anderson Hall. It brings together the offices for the dean of undergraduate education and vice provost for academic student services; Academic Learning Communities; Housing and Residence Life (HRL); and Orientation, Transition, and Retention (OTR).

This restructuring is one of the ways we're trying to remove physical barriers for students, enhance relationships between departments and staff, and centralize support and outreach for students' parents and families. The new One Card and Dining Services department, now open on the first floor of Mary Graydon Center, is another example as we consolidated two departments to improve satisfaction with the dining program.

Frederick Law Olmsted Documentary Editing Project

Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903), the father of American landscape architecture, is famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park in New York City, the Emerald Necklace in Boston, Massachusetts, and Cherokee Park in Louisville, Kentucky. In addition, Olmsted designed many university campuses (Stanford), public buildings (U.S. Capitol grounds), private estates (Biltmore), and the Midway Plaisance in Chicago for the World's Columbian Exposition. He also led the campaign to protect Niagara Falls and served as Secretary of the United States Sanitary Commission (1861-1863) and Commissioner of Yosemite and Mariposa Big Tree Grove (1864-1865).

The Frederick Law Olmsted Documentary Editing Project made its home at American University from 1972 through 2006 and is ongoing. The purpose of the project is "to publish, in annotated form, the most significant of Olmsted's letters, unpublished writings, professional reports, and articles for newspapers and periodicals." The first volume (The Formative Years) was published in 1977 by Johns Hopkins University Press. Over the next four decades, under the direction of Professor Charles Capen McLaughlin and then Professor Charles E. Beveridge, seven more volumes were published.

The archives of the Frederick Law Olmsted Documentary Editing Project contain copies of Frederick Law Olmsted's correspondence, writings, and landscape plans collected from archives around the world as well as historical and contemporary photographs. The editors and project staff also compiled extensive biographical and subject files while researching information for the annotations. In addition, there are administrative files documenting the project's relationship with Johns Hopkins University Press, the editorial process, and fundraising activities including applications and reports to granting agencies. The major series in the collection are as follows:

Charles Capen McLaughlin Endowed Fund

To memorialize this important documentary editing project and recognize the achievements of its founding editor, generous family and friends have donated funds towards the Charles Capen McLaughlin Endowed Fund which will support the preservation of the collection, related programming, and the ongoing work of the University Archives. For information on how you can support this collection, please contact Nicole Weaver at (202) 885-3199.

EPL Faculty

Education Policy and Leadership Director and Staff

Invocation for the College of Arts and Sciences

by Rev. Mark Schaefer, University Chaplain

O Great Mystery,

We have traveled a long road
To bring us to this day.
Here at this crossroads,
at this way station,
we pause to reflect
on the road behind us,
and the road ahead.

We thank you O Lord, Our God, ruler of the universe,
who has granted us life, who has sustained us,
and who has helped us to reach this season, and this point of the journey.

As we pause, we give you thanks
For this moment
For the day and the life-giving rain,
For the celebration of mothers,
and of the gift of life and love.
For the celebration of accomplishment
with family and friends;
For the pomp, the circumstance,
the skirl of the pipes.
For the joy of the day
and the celebration of the moment.

But here, in this moment,
we also look back on the road behind us,
and we give thanks to you,
'God of our weary years, God of our silent tears,
Thou who hast brought us thus far on the way…'

For the journey our graduates set out on years ago
For the learning,
the growth,
the openness to new experiences,
new understandings
the faculty who brought instruction,
the staff who supported them in their need
the semesters abroad, the internships downtown
For the friendships, the relationships,
the late nights
the deep conversations,
and the not-so-deep ones
For the times of joy and of sorrow,
of triumph and defeat.

We know that the way has not always been easy,
At times, stony has been the road we trod,'
and our feet became weary.
We have seen tragedy and grief,
Injustice and hate,
Long borne pain, welling up again.
But on that stony road,
we have also found traveling companions
who have borne us up
who have walked together in solidarity,
who have fought for justice,
who have lived out love,
who have embodied compassion,
who have affirmed our common humanity,
and our common journey, together.
This is the ' hope that the present has brought us.'

And so, in that hope, on this day we give thanks
For the road ahead,
For the difference our graduates will make
For the creativity they will offer
For the gifts they will share
For the wisdom they will continue to acquire
For the passion they will bring
For the imagination they will employ
For the fearlessness with which
they will face the future
and the many challenges it will bring
For witness they will make
to justice, to peace,
to inclusive community
For the way they will change the world itself.

And so, O God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful,
who walks beside us on all the roads of our lives
we pray that in all their journeys
they may continue to be
beacons of hope and promise
to a broken world
a world in need
a world waiting for them.

And let us say: Amen.

 

Invocation for the School of Communication

by Imad-ad-Dean Ahmad, Muslim Chaplain

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم
Bism Allah irRahman ir Rahim,

In the name of God, the Beneficent, the Merciful,
O Creator of All Things, Evolver of all things,
Necessary Existent, known by many names,
Who has spoken to all people in all times,
Through an abundance of prophets
Monopolized by no one race or land,
We gratefully acknowledge your presence with us here today.

This day we celebrate the accomplishments
Of the students of the School of Communication who receive their degrees
And now leave the comfortable nest of their alma mater
To move on to new chapters in their lives.
We invoke Your blessings upon them.

We pray that You will strengthen these graduates,
Purify their intentions and grant them the strength
To use the knowledge and skills they have acquired here
In the service of Truth, Harmony, and Wisdom.

For all these graduates, let what they have learned here
Be a resource on which they draw, wherever they may choose to employ their skills,
That in this polarized time when racial bigotry has spread its poison
Into what has been dedicated to be the sanctuary of reason and academic discourse,
Even onto this campus (Forgive us Lord!), dividing us from one another
By a deafening tempest of angry winds and thunderous ignorance,
Let them hear and understand your words in the Qur'an:
"O humankind! We created you from a single (pair) of a male and a female,
And made you into nations and tribes, that ye may know each other
(Not that ye may despise each other). Verily the most honored of you
In the sight of God is (the one who is) the most righteous of you."
So, lead them to listen more often than they speak,
That regardless of whether they take up careers of advocacy
Or in the media, that they may be conveyors of nuance.
Let them remain ever aware that the word "communication"
Is derived from a root meaning to make common,
And let them, when they seek to inform,
Be guided by the ancient wisdom of the three questions to ask before speaking,

Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary?

Lord, You are the Truth and from you comes the Truth. Hear our prayer!

Amen

Invocation for the School of International Service

by Rev. Joey Heath-Mason, United Methodist Chaplain

Empowering One of grace and mercy, we invite your presence into this place today as family, faculty, administrators, community and friends, have come together to celebrate the accomplishments of the graduating class of 2017 and to hear the petitions of hearts today.

Today we give thanks -

For the sheer magnificence of the mind. By thinking, by the sublime rippling of the muscles of thought, people like DaVinci, Pascal, Bach, Einstein and King have unleashed, not the armies of history, but the power of ideas to change the world. Who knows what lies ahead in the lives of those in this room today?

For the sweet taste of accomplishment. In a world that persistently asks, "What have you done lately?", we are here to celebrate hard work completed and done well. Allow this to be a time of great joy and celebration.

For sacrifices made by others. Most of us have not made it here alone. These significant ones, many of them present today, will walk this stage today in spirit with these graduates.

For the sacrifices made by the graduates themselves. They have shown this dedication through their studies, hours in the library and the many terrace spaces on campus in study groups and group projects, and the all-nighters and turned in at the last moment but on time papers. Through the sweat and tears and shouts of joy in completing we give thanks for what may be the most difficult work they have done to this point in life.

And we ask today for your blessing on these our graduates -

Bless them with passion. Let them move out from this day, not into jobs, but into a calling. Let them live for their passions, their talents, and their gifts, and take every opportunity to put these to good use in creating a better tomorrow.

Bless them with a sense of responsibility. Remind them that they have a contribution to make, to create change and create a better world in whatever places they find themselves. That as graduates they are now a people of privilege charged to use that privilege responsibly and not to the detriment of others.

Bless them with humility. Help them to live not in excessive pride, but in a way that lifts the values of equity and equality of all humanity, that seeks to not lift up oneself alone, but seeks to lift all others as well.

And finally bless them with a legacy. These today will mark the world whether they are trying to or not. Let the shadow of their mark stretch far beyond their liabilities and limitations. Let them know the rich satisfaction, not of merely making a living, but of living a life - full, rich and deep.

For all these things, amen.

Invocation for the Kogod School of Business

by Jason Benkendorf, Jewish Chaplain & Hillel Director

Almighty God, Creator of the universe,

We pause this morning to acknowledge the blessings that have made this special day possible.

We are grateful for the opportunity that these graduates have had to study here at American University. For the classes that have challenged them, the internships that have taught them valuable skills, the late night conversations that have expanded their worldviews.

We are grateful for the community that these graduates found here. God, you teach us that it is not good for human beings to be alone. And, indeed, these graduates have not been alone in this journey. They have shared these years with friends, classmates, devoted faculty and staff, and their experiences have been enriched as a result.

We are grateful that these graduates can celebrate today surrounded by loving family and friends. We recognize the sacrifices that so many of these families have made for their graduates, and we honor them for their selflessness.

God, we thank you for these blessings and so many more.

We know that the journey toward this day has not always been easy. We know, too, that the road ahead will not always be smooth. God, we beseech you: shower your blessings on these talented graduates. Help them to apply the lessons that they have learned here in health and happiness, with humility and generosity, and always in keeping with their highest ideals.

God, go with these graduates, and shine your countenance upon them always.

Praised are you, God, who has sustained us and kept us and allowed us to reach this auspicious day. And let us say, amen.

Invocation for the School of Public Affairs

by Rev. Fr. Carlos Quijano, Catholic Chaplain

[Text coming soon]

Invocation for the Washington College of Law

by Rev. Mark Schaefer, University Chaplain

Blessed are you O Lord, Our God, ruler of the universe,
who has granted us life, who has sustained us,
and who has helped us to reach this season.

In your grace, you have given us the Law
and instilled in our hearts a desire for justice
tempered by mercy.
In pursuit of the knowledge of law these graduates have long labored
(and perhaps long suffered)
and come now to the end of their studies.

We gather this day to celebrate and give thanks:
Thanks for this day and the gift of life;
Thanks for the friends and family who have come
from near and far
Thanks for this University,
for the faculty and staff
for their instruction
their mentoring and guidance
their example and testimony;
And most of all, we give thanks for these graduates:
thanks for the gifts with which you have blessed them;
for the blessing they will be to a world in need.

Grant
that in a world of division,
they might be agents of reconciliation;
that in a world of conflict,
they might be agents of peace;
that in a world of injustice
they might be agents of justice;
that in a world of unfairness,
they might be agents of equity;
that in a world where the voices of so many are drowned out
they might with their advocacy amplify those voices;
that in a world in which so many are pushed to the margins,
they might through their work draw all to the center.
Grant
that in a world where the shadows of 'the dark past'
have a long and troubling reach,
in which the bitter legacy of racism and hate
continues to leave fresh wounds,
they might shine the light that affirms our
noblest aspirations
and that leads us into the future
with 'the hope that the present has brought us.'
Grant
that in a world of rising authoritarianism,
and in a world of rising chaos and disruption
they might be agents of that 'ordered liberty'
that binds your people into a free and just society.

And now, O God, most gracious, most merciful,
O 'God of our weary years, God of our silent tears,
Thou who hast brought us thus far on the way'

Grant that the friendships they have made may continue,
even across the miles and the years;
that the lessons they have learned
and the wisdom they have gained
may not fade, but may only increase.
that any anxiety or doubt about the future
may be complemented by a boldness of vision
and a fearlessness in setting forth in hope, and
that in all things,
they may testify to that hope
in a world in need of their witness,
now more than ever.

And let us say: Amen.

A Blessing for President Burwell

Given by the Chaplains and Community Leaders of the Kay Spiritual Life Center at the April 4, 2018 Interfaith Chapel Service in anticipation of President Burwell's Inauguration

University Chaplain: Sylvia Matthews Burwell, we, the chaplains and spiritual leaders representing the interfaith community at American University gather to share a word of blessing with you this day. As you prepare to be inaugurated as the fifteenth president of this university, we invite you to open your heart and to receive the blessings of our communities.

Catholic Chaplain: May the light of God's divine wisdom shine upon you. May God assist you with God's spirit of counsel and fortitude, that your administration may be conducted in righteousness, and be eminently useful to the students, faculty, and staff of this University.

Sikh Community Representative: Lakh Khushiya Paatisaahia Je Satgur Nadar Kare. Hundreds of thousands of princely pleasures are enjoyed, if the True Guru bestows His Glance of Grace.

United Methodist Chaplain: May God grant you grace to give yourself wholeheartedly to this work and guide you in your labors that it may bring forth a great harvest for generations to come.

Jewish Chaplain: May you find compassion for all those you encounter as president, always remembering that each person is created in the Divine Image.

Muslim Chaplain: السلام عليكم ورحمة الله وبركاته

Muslim Student Leader: May God’s peace, mercy and blessing be upon you

Chi Alpha Chaplain: May you ‘therefore, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that in the Lord your labor is not in vain.’ (1 Cor. 15:58)

University Chaplain: May God make you ever conscious of divine grace in times of stress, of mercy in times of judgment, of wisdom in times of discernment, peace in times of conflict, and of love in all things. And may you feel a sense of belonging, and help others to feel a sense of belonging, here on our campus and in the wider world, all the days of your life. And let us all say:

All: Amen.

 

Application Materials

Most programs have a priority deadline of February 1.

Please review the requirements page of your program of interest for specific requirements and deadlines, or see below.

Obama in Office: The First Two Years, a book from Professor James A. Thurber

James A. Thurber's book, Obama in Office: The First Two Years , is the first scholarly assessment of President Obama and his first two years in office. The book includes chapters by established political scientists, practitioners, and journalists who have studied American political institutions and domestic and international public policy.

CCPS Fellow Publishes New Book

The latest book by Professor John E Owens, The "War on Terror" and the Growth of Executive Power? has been released.
Learn More



Grant Park: The Democratization of Presidential Elections 1968-2008

Professor Candice Nelson's new book examines the democratization of the presidential election process over four turbulent decades.
Learn More

Watch a video and listen to the podcast

CCPS Fellows


Anna Cullen

WMP 2008/AU 2012
Atlanta, GA

Devon Swift

WMP 2008/AU 2012
Sparta, NJ

  • Leverage industry best practices to design and implement learning solutions that meet university goals and IT process standards. 
  • Work in conjunction with technical and regulatory specialists to weave best practices and risk mitigation into our training methodology, content, and evaluation standards.  
  • Regularly benchmark our services Perform comprehensive analytics to ensure performance metric standards are met.

Metropolitan Policy Center In The Media

2014 - 2018

Graduate Students

ORCID Details: ORCID at AU

The Open Researcher and Contributor Identifier (ORCID). Learn why and how to establish your researcher identity with ORCID.

Research Methods

Research Impact Support Contact: Rachel Borchardt

Help with selecting the best metrics and methods to demonstrate scholarly impact, making strategic high-impact publication decisions and maximizing the reach of scholarship.

Research interests

  • Comparative labor market policy

Washington, DC at American University

Located in Washington, DC, the English Language and Training Academy is a full-time ESL program for students who wish to improve their English language skills while becoming closely oriented with American culture. It provides:

  • 18-20 hours of instruction per week
  • Levels ranging from intermediate to advanced
  • Visa support for qualified international students


Summer 2018 Application Deadlines
International Students: April 6
Domestic Students: May 28

Fall 2018 Application Deadlines
International Students: June 22
Domestic Students: August 17

Talking Back to OCD book cover

Talking Back to OCD

The program that helps kids and teens say "no way" - and parents say "way to go"

March, J.S. (2006)


Freeing Your Child From Anxiety

Freeing Your Child from Anxiety

Powerful, practical solutions to overcome your child's fears, worries and phobia

Chansky, T. (2004)


Location: Washington, DC at American University
Students: 150-180
Dates: Aug 19-Dec 16
Credits: 12-15
Experiential: Internship in DC
Site Visits: Smithsonian Museum, Holocaust Memorial Museum
Mentorship Core Courses: Intercultural Understanding, Introduction to College Inquiry, College Writing

Recent Seminar Topics

  • Economic Policy and Global Business
  • Foreign Aid and the Developing World
  • Immigration and Labor
  • Monetary Policy and the Global Financial Architecture
  • Fiscal Policy, Debt, and Financial Crises

Recent Seminar Speakers

  • Gary Hubbard, Director of Public Affairs, US Steel Workers Union
  • William J. Niskanen, Chairman, Cato Institute
  • Keith Hall, Chief Economist, Council of Economic Advisers
  • Patrick Cirillo, Deputy Chief of Operations, IMF Secretariat
  • John Galleher, Vice President, UBS Financial Services

Stage Specifications

The stage meets ADA accessibility requirements. Access may be affected by show-specific technical installations.
Proscenium opening: 16'-0"H x 29'-11"W
Stage Depth to back wall: 31'-0" from plaster line
Stage Depth to back of playing space (scrim/cyc): 21' from plaster line
Apron (architectural): 2'-6"
Apron (w/modular extension): 7'-6"
Orchestra Pit: 30'-0" x 8'-6" nominal (18 musician capacity, accessible)
Ground Plan: please see Ground Plan below

Lighting

Repertory lighting plot: 1 color Front, 2 color top, 1 color back, 2 sidelight systems, 6 specials
Dimming: 196 Strand CD80 & 12 NSI D4DMX
Control: ETC Ion (GT Lighting Operator required, can be shadow)

Dressing Rooms

Total rooms: 2
Large Dressing room: with 25 mirrors, can be split with hospital curtain to 9 and 16 (accessible)
Small Dressing "Diva" room: space at counter for 2-3 (accessible)
Restrooms: 2 for both rooms, equipped with showers (accessible)

Communications

PA: stage announce and house program feed broadcast to dressing rooms, green room, and production areas.
Clear-Com: dual channel system available wherever necessary

Box Office

Box Office service is available 24 hours/day on the internet at american.edu/auartstix. All tickets purchased online or over the phone are held as will-call at the box office and may be picked up 1 hour prior to the show or during normal operating hours.
Box office hours are 3pm-6pm Tue-Sat and 1 hour prior to each ticketed performance. The box office accepts cash, check, MasterCard, Visa, and AU's EagleBucks$ from customers as payment for tickets.

Crews, Building Attendants, Security, and Equipment Rentals

Please request rates regarding charges for personnel needs and equipment rental rates beyond basic rental fee for space use. For normal rates please email the Greenberg Theatre at greenbergtheatre@american.edu.

Costumes, Scenery, and Props

Garment Z-racks and portable steamers are available for use in dressing rooms. The theatre is unable to provide costumes, scenic pieces, or properties for any production. Limited consultation for sourcing of such production requirements may be provided upon request.

Load-in Facilities

Loading Dock is located on the West side of the building above the main building loading dock. Due to limitations of size and location, it is considered more of a materials loading entrance than a workable load-in site. Load-in for scenery will generally take place through the building loading dock and service elevator. There are size limitations (see dimensions below). Oversize items may require street loading from Wisconsin Ave NW, which requires advance notice. (Harold and Sylvia Greenberg Theatre is in no way responsible for obtaining the requisite permits for blocking traffic on this street but may withhold access if client fails to obtain.) Boxes may be no longer than 60" @ 36" W (variables may work, call).

Service Elevator Dimensions: door opening 41.5" wide x 83.5" tall, interior 56" deep x 78.5" wide x 102.5" tall
Loading Dock height: 18' above ground
Loading Dock Door opening: 5'H x 7'W
Loading Dock access: Via yard arm with ½ ton electric motor and 6' Spreader bar; lifting speed 30ft/minute

Reports

The Writing Center

What happens in a Writing Center visit?

"Students prepare papers, we prepare students."

  • You'll meet with another AU student to talk about writing.
  • You'll share your draft and get feedback about your writing project.
  • You can ask questions and get advice about ways to improve your writing.

In free, 45-minute consultations, we will work with you on issues such as:

  • Interpreting a writing assignment
  • Generating ideas
  • Locating and sharpening a thesis statement
  • Organizing ideas and research
  • Developing logical arguments
  • Polishing your prose
  • Finding strategies for revising
  • Identifying recurrent errors

My thought is just a thought book cover

A Thought Is Just a Thought

A story of living with OCD

Talley, L. (2004)


Education professor Dennis conferring with student after class.

In the Teacher Education Program you will:

  • Work with outstanding faculty known in the academic community for generating ground-breaking ideas for the improvement of education and instruction.
  • Take innovative, progressive classes in a small, individual-focused setting while be surrounded by students who share your interests in education and build a network of resources for your future.
  • Build a network of resources for your future in diverse field experiences in DC Public Schools and throughout the DC Metro Area.

Still have questions? Send us an email: teachered@american.edu

Laura Blumenfeld and Samuel G. Freedman in Conversation

September 27, 2017

RSVP: Blumenfeld & Freedman

When you enroll in American University’s Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program, you are taking a step toward helping to build a better society. We offer students access to cutting-edge research, innovative partnerships with educational organizations in Washington, DC, and an engaging, progressive curriculum—all to leave you equipped and eager to inspire the next generation of students to solve society’s biggest problems.

Our university’s strong political and social legacy means we’re well positioned to attract world-changing passion, encourage it, and help you channel it back into the world where it can make a difference. Our top-notch faculty consists of respected specialists and researchers who offer their graduate students innovative, evidence-based teaching techniques.

American University’s MAT program is CAEP-recognized and designed for individuals who have a bachelor’s degree and are interested in obtaining a teaching license in either elementary or secondary education (English and social studies).

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Still have questions? Send us an email: communication@american.edu

Internship Sites

  • Brookings Institute
  • White House Council of Economic Advisors
  • U.S.-China Business Council
  • Europe-American Business Council
  • Merrill Lynch

Research interests

  • International trade
  • Globalization
Lily Maier, Washington Semester Program student

Fulbright Scholar Gets Her Start at AU

Lilly Maier fell in love with U.S. politics after watching Aaron Sorkin's West Wing, so she left the Ludwig Maximillian University in Munich to gain experience in DC through WSP.

Full Story



Copyright Fair Use Contact: Chris Lewis

Unsure if quoting or reproducing someone else’s work in your article is covered by the fair use exemption? Our copyright specialist will help you decide and seek a legal opinion if needed.

Proposal Development Support

The pre-award team supports faculty in the pursuit of their research goals from the initial planning stage to proposal submission and serves as a liaison between PIs and support offices at AU and externally. The CAS pre-award office will:

  • Create submission workplan and timeline with CAS faculty
  • Develop proposal budget
  • Review proposals for responsiveness to RFP and technical specifications
  • Ensure compliance with rules, regulations, policies and procedures in conjunction with CAS, Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP), relevant departments and other AU offices
  • Route proposals for internal review and approval

Author Rights Contact: Chris Lewis,

Before signing a copyright transfer agreement with a publisher, you are welcome to contact the library to discuss the agreement’s implications and possible alternatives.

A Flexible Program With Solid Results

This 33-credit program provides rigorous graduate training in psychology and psychological research while providing you with the flexibility to pursue your academic interests. We offer three different tracks of specialization: general psychology, experimental/biological psychology, personality/social psychology, and general psychology.

The general psychology track provides a balance of coursework in experimental/biological and personality/social psychology, together with training in psychological research and statistics. This is the most flexible program, offering thesis and non-thesis options as well as the most elective courses.

In the experimental/biological and personality/social psychology tracks, you will delve deeper into your chosen area of specialization while still receiving a solid foundation in general psychology, research, and statistics. You will apply what you've learned to your master's thesis, in which you will complete an original research project in your chosen area of interest. 

See complete Admissions & Course Requirements.

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Compare Mentorship Programs by Location
Location Washington, DC Thessaloniki, Greece Bath, England
University Partner American University American College of Thessaloniki Bath Spa University
Students 150-180 24 24
Dates Aug 19-Dec 16 Sep 17-Dec 16 Sep 21-Dec 15
Credits 12-15 15 15
Experiential Internship experience in DC International immersion in intercultural affairs International immersion in leadership and entrepreneurship
Site Visits Smithsonian Museums, Holocaust Memorial Museum Athens, Delphi, Royal Tombs London, Stonehenge
Mentorship Core Courses Intercultural Understanding, Introduction to College Inquiry, College Writing Intercultural Understanding, Introduction to College Inquiry, College Writing (online) Intercultural Understanding, Introduction to College Inquiry, College Writing (online)
Elective Courses Choice of Politics in the US, Mathematics, or Statistics History of Thessaloniki, Introduction to Contemporary Greek Culture and Society Economics and Globalisation, Visions of Business and Leadership
Housing AU residence hall with full access to AU’s services Hotel residence housing in Thessaloniki’s city center Flat-style living on BSU’s campus
Cost $30,650 $31,429 $30,809
Website Mentorship in Washington Mentorship in Greece Mentorship in England

Seminar Topics

  • Economic Policy and Global Business
  • Foreign Aid and the Developing World
  • Immigration and Labor
  • Monetary Policy and the Global Financial Architecture
  • Fiscal Policy, Debt, and Financial Crises

Seminar Speakers

  • Gary Hubbard, Director of Public Affairs, US Steel Workers Union
  • William J. Niskanen, Chairman, Cato Institute
  • Keith Hall, Chief Economist, Council of Economic Advisers
  • Patrick Cirillo, Deputy Chief of Operations, IMF Secretariat
  • John Galleher, Vice President, UBS Financial Services

Internship Sites

  • American Academy of Diplomacy
  • Brookings Institute
  • Embassy of France
  • Center for a Free Cuba
  • Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Seminar Topics

  • The News Media and Foreign Policy
  • Think Tanks and the U.S. Foreign Policy Debate
  • Redefining Security in a Globalized World
  • Nuclear Proliferation in the Age of Global Terrorism
  • Managing the Dynamics of U.S.-Russian Relations

Seminar Speakers

  • Richard G. Lugar, U.S. Senator
  • Amb. James Woolsey, Former Director of the CIA
  • Minister Counselor François Rivasseau, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of France
  • H.E. Sergey Kislyak, Ambassador of the Russian Federation
  • Amb. Richard Haass, President, Council on Foreign Relations

Happy Holidays,

sylvia signature

Academic Records and Degree Clearance
Staff Name Title
Michael B. Hunnicutt Associate Registrar for Academic Records and Degree Clearance
David Baratta Assistant Registrar for Degree ClearanceAssistant Registrar for Degree Clearance
McKendree ("JJ") Whitney Assistant Registrar for Record Services
Alison Caldwell Senior Records Coordinator
Denise Lewis Record Services Coordinator
Paul Oh Coordinator for Degree Clearance and DiplomasCoordinator for Degree Clearance and Diplomas
Joseph Costigan Coordinator for Degree Clearance and Diplomas
Meghan Killoran Coordinator for Degree Clearance and Diplomas
Curriculum and Degree Audit
Staff Name Title

Michael Giese

Associate Registrar for Curriculum and Degree Audit
Mary-Ellen Jones Assistant Registrar for Curriculum
Elizabeth O'Connor Assistant Registrar for Degree Audit
Carmen Cain Curriculum Services Coordinator
Carlos Amaya Degree Audit Coordinator

Steam Line Project

Area(s) Affected:

  • The Beach (area behind McKinley Building) and parking lot between McKinley and Beeghley Buildings will be closed for the duration of construction.

Alternate Route

  • Access to Reeves Field will remain open between Bender Arena and Asbury Building and between Beeghley Building and Broadcast/Media Production Center.

Map of the southern half of campus, showing buildings and areas fenced off during construction

Still have questions?

View all FAQs

Data Visualization Contact: Bill Harder

Creating visualizations of data to understand or convey data analyses.

Kogod provides targeted advising for student organizations in officer training, event planning, goal-setting, organizational behavior and more.

Complementing the support from AU's Student Activities office, business-focused student organizations receive additional support from Kogod in their management and promotion. See those student organizations below. No contact information for one of the groups below? Looking to start a new organization? Contact Andrew Toczydlowski at andrew@american.edu.

  • Offer more than 24 unique courses featuring a variety of training choices, including instructor-led, on-demand web-based training, and custom training options.  
  • Deliver training year-round for current AU staff, faculty, and students.
  • Easy registration process via the OIT Training SharePoint site. 
  • New Pathways to Success to maximizes learning opportunities.
  • Offer more than 24 unique courses featuring a variety of training choices, including instructor-led, on-demand web-based training, and custom training options.  
  • Deliver training year-round for current AU staff, faculty, and students.
  • Easy registration process via the OIT Training SharePoint site. 
  • New Pathways to Success to maximizes learning opportunities.

Eligibility

  • Full-time faculty or staff members are eligible as of the first of the month following date of hire
  • Changes can be made during open enrollment or when a qualifying event occurs.
  • Dependents include:
    • Spouse, opposite or same-sex domestic partner
    • Children to age 26 or any age if disability requirement is met

Unequal Justice: the Relentless Rise of the 1% Court

On April 8th at noon, join CCPS, the Kay Spiritual Life center, and the Alliance for Justice for a showing of this new film. Discussion to follow

Learn more

AU Experts Analyze the 2014 Election

Thursday, November 6th at 12PM
Kay Spiritual Life Center

Join CCPS, WPI, and the Kay Spiritual Life Center for an analysis of the 2014 Midterm election results. Discussion will include the following panelists:

  • Anna Greenberg; CCPS Research Fellow and Senior Vice President of Greenberg, Quinlan, Rosner
  • Jennifer Lawless; Professor of Government and Director of the Women & Politics Institute
  • Candice Nelson; Professor and Department Chair of Government and Director of the Campaign Management Institute
  • Molly O'Rourke; Executive in Residence, School of Communications

Panel will be moderated by James A. Thurber, director of the Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies, and distinguished university professor.

Lunch will be served from 12:00-12:20 in the Kay Lounge. Panel will take place in the Kay Chapel at 12:30.

Please RSVP to ccps@american.edu or (202)885-3491

Learn More

What to Do When You Worry Too Much book cover

What to Do When You Worry Too Much

A kid's guide to overcoming anxiety (What to do guide for kids)

Heubner, D. & Matthews, B. (2005)

Nobody's Perfect

Nobody's Perfect

A story for children about perfectionism

Burns, E.F., & Pelton Villnave, E. (2008)


Exhibition Overview

Raya Bodnarchuk’s sculpted animals and people are beautifully and carefully observed, the mature work of a master of many different media. Trained at the Rhode Island School of Art and Design and the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute College of Art, Bodnarchuk has been a major artist and an influential mentor in Washington for forty years.

AU Memo Letterhead

Memorandum February 26, 2018

To:
AU Community
From:
Jack C. Cassell, Chairman, Board of Trustees
Subject:
Board of Trustees Winter 2018 Meeting Summary

The Board of Trustees held its winter meeting on Thursday, February 22, and Friday, February 23, on American University’s East Campus. Committee meetings were held Thursday and the full board met on Friday. The following is a summary of business and items of interest from the two days.

After a full day of eight committee meetings, the board viewed interactive, augmented reality posters that will be used by Admissions and had the chance to talk with Sharon Alston, vice provost for undergraduate enrollment, and with student ambassadors. The trustees then heard a dinner presentation by Gihan Fernando, executive director of the Career Center, on the center’s work to prepare students for life after AU. A key aspect of the strategic planning effort now underway is to create a plan that builds on the liberal arts and utilizes experiential education to prepare students with the tools they need for the future job market and lifelong education and the components to help leverage post-graduate success in life.

On Friday morning, trustees met with close to 40 faculty for a breakfast discussion and to hear their perspectives on issues of importance, which was followed by a Q&A session with President Burwell, Provost Bass, and me.

The board’s Friday business meeting followed the faculty breakfast. Of particular note, President Burwell, gave an update on the strategic planning effort to seek board input.

The president updated the board on the formal launch of AU’s Plan for Inclusive Excellence, Building an Inclusive Campus Community, as a lead-in for the 60-minute discussion that followed on the “Experience of African-American Students at AU and the Way Forward.” The discussion featured two student leaders sharing their first-hand experiences of their four years at AU. Shyheim Snead, former student trustee, current director of the Kennedy Political Union, and senior in SPA/CAS; and Lauren Lumpkin, editor-in-chief of The Blackprint and an SOC senior majoring in public relations and strategic communication, gave valuable insights. Bette Dickerson, interim assistant vice president of campus life and associate professor emerita in the department of sociology, discussed the most recent Campus Climate survey and how African American students assess their AU educational experience. This was followed by trustee questions and discussion to increase board understanding.

In other board business, two new degree programs were approved—a master of science in counterterrorism and homeland security in the School of Public Affairs; and a master of philosophy in international relations in the School of International Service.

CFO, Vice President and Treasurer Doug Kudravetz reviewed the emerging list of “Key Performance Indicators” to provide the board with graphical representations of AU’s critical success factors. 

During the winter and spring meetings, the AU board conducts an annual process of trustee review. AU voting trustees serve for three-year renewable terms, and each year, approximately one-third of the class undergoes review. The process for this current class (six members) will conclude at the May meeting.

As part of this review, I want to update the community regarding trustee and alumnus Ross Levinsohn, who as we reported to campus, took a voluntary leave of absence from board service on January 19, following news reports alleging wrongdoing. Recently, an independent investigation commissioned by his employer, Tronc, Inc., and conducted by the law firm of Sidley Austin LLP, found “no wrongdoing on the part of Mr. Levinsohn,” according to a Tronc statement. A proud AU alum, Mr. Levinsohn has notified me that, while he cares deeply for American University, at this time, he will not stand for re-election for another term on the board.

Meanwhile, we welcomed our newest trustee to board service—Mr. Gaurdie Banister, parent of a recent Kogod alumnus.

In April, we will formally inaugurate Sylvia Mathews Burwell as AU’s 15th president. The formal inauguration will be held at 11 a.m., Thursday, April 12, in Bender Arena. A variety of campus events are being planned for the two days—Wednesday, April 11, and Thursday, April 12—to celebrate American University’s past, our present, and this historic occasion as a look toward the future.

The next Board of Trustees meetings will be May 17–18 on the AU campus.

As we approach the mid-point of spring semester, I wish success for the entire campus community, and we’ll see you at the inauguration in April.

Folio is a nationally recognized literary journal sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences at American University in Washington, DC. Since 1984, we have published original creative work by both new and established authors. Past issues have included work by Michael Reid Busk, Billy Collins, William Stafford, and Bruce Weigl, and interviews with Michael Cunningham, Charles Baxter, Amy Bloom, Ann Beattie, and Walter Kirn. We look for well-crafted poetry and prose that is bold and memorable.

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Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

AU Logo

Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

Steve Kelly

"I love working at AU because of the wonderful professional and personal relationships it has afforded me. Tuition benefits and Human Resources delivered learnings have also played a big part in furthering my career and strengthening my managerial skills."

Steve Kelly
Director, Customer Support Services
Office of Information Technology Customer Service

#WhyIWorkAtAU

Whether it's our employee benefits, career opportunities, or collegiate atmosphere, check out what some our current staff members have to say!

Chemical Inventory

University policy requires each individual in control of chemicals used in research on campus to maintain an accurate chemical inventory in order to minimize waste, track reporting limits, and comply with hazard communication laws. The Office of Environmental Health and Safety manages the chemical inventory software for the university. If you would like to have an account made, contact the EH&S office for assistance.

Hazardous Waste

Guidelines

Hazardous waste must be handled according to national and local guidelines. No amount of hazardous waste may be thrown into the regular trash or poured down the drain. Please contact Environmental Health and Safety to arrange disposal of all hazardous waste. For more information, view our hazardous waste guidelines.

Container Requirements

All hazardous waste must be properly contained. Environmental Health and Safety provides waste containers upon request. Items not properly packaged will be returned to the generator. You can request a container by filling out the container request form.

Labels

Hazardous waste must be marked with a completed AU hazardous waste label. Environmental Health and Safety can provide these labels upon request or they can be downloaded and printed on Avery 3-1/3" x 4" shipping labels..

Annual Events

Events & Announcements

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Todd Sloan
Assistant Vice President of Development
202-885-3424 | View Profile

Our MA in Economics is an applied, policy-oriented 30-36 credit program designed to ensure that our graduates make an impact by developing these three critical skills:

  • Use economic theory to explain outcomes and make informed predictions
  • Analyze data to rigorously answer questions, such as how specific policies will affect markets
  • Convey economic concepts and findings to a wide audience.

Coursework will prepare you to interpret economic models, test hypotheses, and analyze human and organizational behavior to make a positive impact on society.

Students can choose from five distinct tracks withing the program: general economics, development economics, gender analysis in economics, financial economic policy, and applied economics (online only).

Complete Degree and Course Requirements

Still have questions? Send us an email: econ@american.edu

Flávio Contrera

Flávio Contrera is a Political Science PhD candidate at the Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar). He received his MA in Political Science from UFSCar in 2013 and his BA in Social Sciences from the Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP) in 2010. While at CLALS, his research was sponsored by the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo. His topics of interest include political parties, legislative behavior, foreign policy, and US-Latin America relations.

Entrance Semesters
Fall, spring, summer.
Application Deadlines
Fall priority admissions, March 1; applications on a rolling basis until August 1.
Spring priority admissions, November 1; applications on a rolling basis until December 1.
Summer admission: May 1
Additional Requirements
Statement of Purpose
Transcripts
2 Letters of Recommendation
Resume
Praxis Core scores (Passing scores by DC standards on Praxis Core exam: Reading 156, Writing 162, Math 150).
Application
Online Application
Illustration of smiling slice of bread

Dance Opportunities In The Capital City

The D.C. Metro area is home to a vibrant dance community with many seasoned and emerging dance companies, choreographers, and artists. AU's close proximity to several leading arts organizations offers students a chance participate in internships in dance education, production, management, and performance.

A few of these organizations include The John F. Kennedy Center, Dance Place, Joy of Motion, the Washington Ballet, Dance Loft on 14, Dance Exchange, Urban Artistry Dance Academy, Joe's Movement Emporium, Dance/USA, Signature Theatre, and more.

The Visual Resources Center is a hub for imaging, research consultation, print resources on the arts and graphic design, and audio/video equipment circulation for all programs of the Art Department. It is a welcoming environment for all Art students and a good place for small meetings or study sessions.

VRC Resources

Other Useful Links

PhD Programs

January 1 (Fall admission only)

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

AU alum teaching in class

Designed for individuals with a bachelor's degree and interest in a teaching license, the MAT program

  • provides online and on-campus options, each requiring 5 semesters
  • offers 2 tracks: elementary or secondary education; see MAT Admissions & Requirements
  • does not require previous training or experience in education
  • offers Scholarships & Partnerships including City Year / AISGW, TEACH Grants, Ganek Family Mini-Grants
  • prepares graduates for direct entry into positions as classroom teacher, curriculum specialist, arts coordinator, adult educator, program head, and related careers
Samantha Dumas

Samantha Dumas

Literature and American Studies, 2018

Samantha Dumas is a junior from Massachusetts double majoring in Literature and American Studies with a minor in education. She likes to read and write poetry and puts these skill to use as the co-editor of AU's arts magazine, AmLit. Her hobbies include vegan baking, makeup artistry, plotting the overthrow of the capitalist patriarchy, raising house plants, and watching reality TV.

Catherine M. Conaghan

Catherine M. Conaghan is the Sir Edward Peacock Professor of Latin American Politics at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. She received her PhD from Yale and has written extensively on Andean politics. Her books include Fujimori's Peru: Deception in the Public Sphere (2005), Unsettling Statecraft: Democracy and Neoliberalism in the Central Andes (with James Malloy, 1994), and Restructuring Domination: Industrialists and the State in Ecuador (1988). She held the Knapp Chair at the University of San Diego and has been a visiting fellow at Princeton, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the Kellogg Institute. Her journal contributions include publications in the Journal of Latin American Studies, The International Journal of Press/Politics, and the Journal of Democracy. While at CLALS, her research focused on the "new normativity" aimed societal regulation in Ecuador and its impact on the state and political development. Her analysis includes policies regulating the mass media, civil society organizations and higher education.

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Internship and In-Class Course 4 Credits

Supplementing the graded internship experience, you will participate in a Mentored Field Practicum (MFP) class. Led by an experienced American University instructor, the MFP course enables you to have a successful educational experience at your internship, as it provides a forum for exploring common challenges and opportunities in the workplace, including job responsibilities, communication with co-workers, diversity in the workplace, and goal setting.

You will also identify skills crucial to success in the professional field in which you are interning and you will connect theories and knowledge gained in your seminar classes with "real world" experiences.

FAQs

Mentorship United Kingdom Ambassador Conall Hirsch

Conall Hirsch

Connal Hirsch is a student ambassador.

Conall's Blog

Abbe MurphyAbbe Murphy is a second-year Interdisciplinary Studies: Communications, Legal Institutions, Economics, and Government (CLEG) major with a minor in Computer Science. She is a member of AU’s Mock Trial team and a research fellow for the Peace and Violence Research Lab. Abbe’s passion for speech rights led her to become a peer facilitator, where she looks forward to facilitating productive conversations on campus.

Charge, Steering Committee, and Subcommittee Structure, 2017-2018

Charge: The Sexual Assault Working Group (SAWG) is charged with reviewing the university's efforts on issues of interpersonal and sexual violence including sexual assault, dating and domestic violence, and stalking. The Working Group will assess current efforts, identify areas for improvement, and make recommendations to the Vice President of Campus Life to ensure that our campus approach is comprehensive, effective, and compliant with Title IX and the Campus SaVE Act. SAWG is organized into a Steering Committee with five subcommittees focused on student advocacy and support, campus awareness and education, university policies and procedures, outreach and communications, and assessment.

Reports to: Dr. Fanta Aw, Vice President of Campus Life

Chair: Dr. Rob Hradsky, Assistant Vice President of Campus Life and Dean of Students

Friday, August 24:

  • MA in Film and Electronic Media
  • MFA in Film and Media Arts
  • MFA in Game and Interactive Media
  • MA in Game Design
  • MA in Global Media
  • MA in Journalism and Public Affairs
  • MA in Political Communication
  • MA in Strategic Communication

There will be two orientations, based on program. Email invites will be sent in early July.

Fall 2018 Hours

IN-PERSON HOURS:
Monday-Thursday: 10 am - 8 pm 
Friday and Sunday: 10 am - 6 pm 
Saturday: Closed 

DROP-IN HOURS:
Monday: 4 pm - 6pm
Tuesday: 11 am - 1 pm
Wednesday: 6 pm - 8 pm
Thursday: 11 am - 1 pm
Friday: 1 pm - 3 pm
Sunday: 12 pm - 2 pm 

ONLINE APPOINTMENTS
Monday: 10 am - 1pm; 8pm - 9pm
Tuesday: 1pm - 4pm
Wednesday: 6pm - 7pm; starting in October: 10 am - 1pm, 3 pm - 6 pm
Thursday: 6pm - 9pm; Starting in October: 11 am - 2 pm
Friday: Starting in October: 1 pm - 4 pm
Sunday: 12 pm - 5 pm

The Writing Center

What happens in a Writing Center visit?


"Students prepare papers, we prepare students."

  • You'll meet with another AU student to talk about writing.
  • You'll share your draft and get feedback about your writing project.
  • You can ask questions and get advice about ways to improve your writing.

In free, 45-minute consultations, we will work with you on issues such as:

  • Interpreting a writing assignment
  • Generating ideas
  • Locating and sharpening a thesis statement
  • Organizing ideas and research
  • Developing logical arguments
  • Polishing your prose
  • Finding strategies for revising
  • Identifying recurrent errors

Noam Glanzberg-KraininNoam Glanzberg-Krainin is a sophomore studying Interdisciplinary Studies: Communication, Legal Institutions, Economics, and Government (CLEG) in the School of Public Affairs. He is a member of the AU Honors Program and the AU Debate Society and interns on Capitol Hill. Noam is looking forward to creating a space at AU where students with different political opinions can respectfully discuss the pressing issues of our time, engage with unfamiliar beliefs, and strengthen their own principles.

Robert WinesRobert Wines is a junior at American University studying Interdisciplinary Studies: Communication, Legal Institutions, Economics, and Government (CLEG), with an intended minor in Entrepreneurship. He currently serves as the president of the American University College Republicans, is a brother of Sigma Phi Epsilon, and is a winger for the men’s ice hockey team.

Jason SteuerwaldJason Steuerwald is a second-year Justice and Law student at American University. On campus, he is a part of the School of Public Affairs Leadership Program, a member of the executive board of PRIDE, and an overnight library assistant. Outside of school, he is involved in drum corps and got to spend this summer touring the country and competing as a member of the Oregon Crusaders. He is looking forward to becoming more engaged with and helping to facilitate some of the exciting conversations that are happening on campus.

Memorandum May 22, 2017

To:
AU Community
From:
Neil Kerwin, President
Subject:
Effect of a Recent Local Tragedy

A nearby tragedy at the University of Maryland early Saturday morning is weighing heavily on many of us. A graduating senior at Bowie State University with a promising future was murdered in College Park in a senseless act of violence. A University of Maryland student is being held and charged with the murder. Hate bias is being investigated as the motive, enveloping those two campus communities in shock, anger, fear and grief.

Given the hate crime that occurred on our own campus on May 1, it is understandable that this horrible event would raise anxiety and concern in our own community. I want to provide you with both reassurance and support.

Since three weeks have passed and the semester has ended, I know there are concerns that the investigation of the hate crime on our campus has stalled or that our sense of urgency may be lost. However, as I reminded the community during commencement ceremonies, we will not rest until those responsible have been identified and brought to justice.

The American University Police Department (AUPD) continues to work with law enforcement partners at the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the United States District Attorney’s office. We will need to exercise patience and resolve while we allow law enforcement officials the time they need to conduct a thorough investigation. To the extent possible, the university will provide periodic updates, but I hope all understand that comments on the status of the investigation will be limited. Meanwhile, AUPD has stepped up visibility and maintains its vigilance for public safety on the campus, and offers a host of resources and services for members of the community to enhance their personal safety. Students needing support are encouraged to contact the Counseling Center. Faculty and staff are urged to contact the Faculty Staff Assistance Program for short-term counseling support. Moreover, all of us should take a moment to check in and offer support to colleagues, especially during this, Staff Appreciation Week. Finally, university leaders are working over the summer with members of the community to review many ideas that have been raised for additional, effective new efforts to enhance inclusion and improve the campus climate. In that regard, President-designate Burwell joins me in the commitment to rededicate our community to that purpose.

EBSCO Databases

Links from AU Library Search to Ebsco databases are not working consistently.  We are working with Ebsco to find a resolution.  The best work-around is to go directly to an Ebsco database from the Databases A-Z list.

The following list of PDF documents contain important guidelines, deadlines, and proposal formatting information in order for faculty to apply for support awards.

HNRS-498: In this 3-6 credit course, you will create a capstone in your major or through Honors. You will be work with a faculty mentor of your choosing. Examples of capstone project include: traditional scholarly thesis, creative work, case study, business plan, media project, etc.

How to Register for Classes Webinar by Program

April 16 – April 23

You will receive an email invite after you have paid your seat deposit, see the first step.

Admitted Students Day

April 14 | 9:30am – 1:00pm

You will receive an email invite after you have been admitted.

How to Add and Encode a New Video

What to Do When Your Brain Gets Stuck book cover

What to Do When Your Brain Gets Stuck

A kid’s guide to overcoming OCD (what-to-do guides for kids)

Huebner, D., & Matthews, B. (2007)


All undergraduate programs at Kogod provide a balanced approach to business education by progressively building knowledge within and across academic fields.

The Kogod School of Business offers the following undergraduate majors:

Every organization needs smart people who can solve problems and make good decisions. By focusing on business in college, you will graduate with a set of skills that allow you to pursue a career in any field.

Kogod's curriculum is flexible and provides students with the opportunity to combine their passion for business with interests in other academic areas through interdisciplinary study.

Exemplary students have the opportunity to continue their education in one of Kogod's five-year bachelor of science to master of science programs.

Still have questions? Send us an email: teachered@american.edu

Education professor Dennis conferring with student after class.

In the Teacher Education Program you will:

  • Work with outstanding faculty known in the academic community for generating ground-breaking ideas for the improvement of education and instruction.
  • Take innovative, progressive classes in a small, individual-focused setting while be surrounded by students who share your interests in education and build a network of resources for your future.
  • Build a network of resources for your future in diverse field experiences in DC Public Schools and throughout the DC Metro Area.

Israeli Soldiers, Sudanese Refugees, and a Talmudic Debate

November 6, 2017
An Evening with Israeli Writer and Translator Haim Watzman

See More about November 6

Kogod's Graduate Admissions Team


President's Reports and Announcements

AU Memo Letterhead

Memorandum February 10, 2017

To:
AU Community
From:
Neil Kerwin, President
Subject:
Resources and Support for AU's Undocumented Students

Since its founding, AU has been a place that welcomes students and faculty from around the world and studies and advances international service. We value diverse global perspectives that enrich our community. I joined other university and college presidents to express support for public policies consistent with these values, including endorsing responsible global engagement and the DACA program for undocumented immigrant students. I offered five specific commitments to support undocumented students at AU, and last week, I added American University to the list of educational institutions and associations encouraging the president to reconsider the recent executive order banning travelers from seven majority-Muslim nations.

Given the fear, confusion and uncertainty amidst changing immigration policies, the university has received petitions from faculty and students to do all we can to support undocumented students, if DACA is suspended or repealed. We will offer protection to the full extent allowed by law, guided by policies that guard the privacy and safety of every member of the university community. We reviewed these policies and practices after September 11, 2001 and have updated them in light of current concerns.

Be assured that AU will not disclose private information about our students, faculty, or staff to law enforcement officers unless presented with a warrant, subpoena, court order or other legal requirement. While our public safety department will comply with the law, it is not their practice to be an agent for or assist the federal government in immigration enforcement actions.

In addition, we will ensure that affected members of our community know where they can turn for guidance and support. On matters related to immigration, the Office of International Student and Scholar Services will provide referrals to immigration attorneys and resources. For those experiencing stress and anxiety, our Counseling Center, Faculty Staff Assistance Program, Center for Diversity and Inclusion, and Kay Spiritual Life Center are available to offer support. In the event that the DACA program is suspended or ended and authorization to work is rescinded, the university will assist currently registered AU DACA students to find replacement resources.

With these actions, we are committing our university to the protection of our undocumented students. As I noted in a previous communication, there are calls from members of our community to declare American University is a "sanctuary." I have concluded that the findings of many other universities and respected immigration attorneys are correct, in that asserting such a status would have no basis in the law. The institution does not have the authority to exempt itself from federal immigration law. I share the concerns of others that claiming such status could indeed be counterproductive and lead to greater risk for the very students we seek to protect.

As we work to advocate for national policies and immigration laws that reflect the values of global engagement and international exchange, we will respect the rule of law and use every legal means at our disposal to offer our support and protection. I welcome ideas from the community that are consistent with these values.

Kira PyneKira Pyne is a junior majoring in Interdisciplinary Studies: Communication, Legal Institutions, Economics, and Government (CLEG) and minoring in Psychology. She is a member of the SPA Honors Program, part of the Standards Committee for the Rude Mechanicals, and a New Membership Assistant for Phi Alpha Delta. Kira is excited to help to make AU a more inclusive campus and she is looking forward to meeting the students she will be working with.

A woman weaving fabric made from lotus stems at Inle Lake in Myanmar

SIS Alumni

Alumni Winner

"The Lotus Weavr" by Ha Le
Inle Lake, Myanmar; 2012

For over a century, women in Inle Lake have weaved their faith and devotion into the world's most expensive and finest fabrics which is made of lotus stems. It often takes at least 20,000 lotus stems and 40 days of hard work to produce one square meter of the fabric.

Gray stone slabs of differing heights at the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin, Germany

SIS Faculty

Faculty Winner

"Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe" by Robert Tomasko
Berlin, Germany; 2007

Sitting a stone’s throw from what was Adolf Hitler’s bunker and Chancellery on land that was later home to the Berlin Wall, this is the most moving memorial I have ever seen. Its bland, gray concrete slabs of varying heights in a grid pattern represent a supposedly ordered system that has lost touch with human reason – the horribly efficient Nazi killing machine. I want the viewer of the photo to sense some of the disorientation, discomfort, and entrapment the Memorial conveys to a visitor lost walking among the concrete rectangles.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style Center gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Recent revelations about Uber's failure to disclose a 2016 data breach affecting 57 million drivers and users highlight a number of important governance considerations. This installment of KCGC | In Practice considers some of the key challenges that many organizations may face regarding one of these considerations: the role of in-house cybersecurity legal counsel.


In the fallout over Uber's recent disclosure regarding a data breach and pursuant cover-up of that breach in 2016, two individuals who reportedly oversaw the incident response were fired: Chief Security Officer (CSO) Joe Sullivan and Craig Clark, an attorney reporting directly to Sullivan as the Legal Director for Security and Law Enforcement. Reports indicate that the Company's General Counsel, Salle Yoo, claims she did not know about the incident or the cover-up.

Uber's debacle is the result of multiple governance and operational failures, not least of which being the company's notorious culture of disregard for the law. But the role of Sullivan and Clark in the incident touches on challenges that many companies may face related to managing cybersecurity legal risk as they seek to meet operational imperatives.

Embedded Attorneys

Recognizing the significant reputational and financial impact of cybersecurity legal risk as well as the highly technical and fast-moving nature of cybersecurity operations, organizations are increasingly adopting the practice of "embedding" (also sometimes referred to as "forward deploying") attorneys specializing in cybersecurity with the information security team instead of relying on a centrally-housed legal team or outside counsel. The basic idea is that these technically-proficient attorneys are dedicated full-time to supporting the cybersecurity or information security team in order to provide expert legal support at-speed. They are often co-located with technical personnel, sitting alongside them and attending operational and other meetings as a member of the team.

Reporting Structure for Cybersecurity Legal Counsel

Although considering these positions as part of a multi-disciplinary team can help to facilitate more comprehensive, informed and seamless legal support, these attorneys should still report to the General Counsel (GC) and should not be considered direct reports of the CSO or other information security leadership positions.

First, the assessment and management of cybersecurity legal risk is highly fact-dependent, including the detailed facts of specific incidents as well as higher level facts about the company's operations and other obligations. Legal guidance in this area cannot be sound if given in isolation. For example, in the event of the 2016 Uber breach, an adequate assessment of the company's legal risk related to the incident and response, including disclosure, likely would require an understanding not only of the company's security posture and the data that was accessed (including the types of data, data subjects, location and state of data) but a number of other factors as well. These might include, among other things, the implications of the company's contractual relationships (e.g., GitHub, AWS, security vendors, other relevant third parties), any relevant consent orders, ongoing litigation or investigations and how the nature and location of the company's operations might implicate a range of applicable laws and regulations across jurisdictions, some with potentially conflicting requirements.

In addition, because cybersecurity touches so many aspects of an organization, it can also have a profound impact on analysis and guidance regarding other areas of legal risk. As a sampling, cybersecurity issues may affect legal guidance regarding mergers and acquisitions (from both the buyer and seller side), purchase of products or services, sharing of proprietary business information in any number of contexts, recruitment and employment decisions, strategy and obligations regarding ongoing litigation and government investigations, and marketing, public policy and lobbying efforts.

The GC is ultimately responsible for overseeing, assessing and advising on all of these risks as they inform the company's overall legal risk. In order to fulfill this responsibility, the GC must have an understanding through her reports of the impact of particular cyber incidents, general cyber-related legal risk and legal risk related to the variety of other activities and issues that may be impacted by cyber. In addition, to fulfill her role as an advisor, the GC needs to be properly informed and prepared to report up to the CEO and the Board.

To ensure legal risk is properly evaluated at all levels, cybersecurity legal risk must be evaluated contextually and overseen by the highest levels of leadership. Accordingly, companies who want to benefit from embedded cybersecurity attorneys should require that those attorneys are still integrated with and accountable to the legal team and the General Counsel.

Internal Incident Reporting Policy

The flipside of this need for proper accountability is the critical need for operationally efficient legal support. Depending on its size, operations and maturity, a company may detect numerous potential incidents each day, making direct involvement by senior legal officers or even an embedded cybersecurity attorney extremely unwieldy and inefficient for both the operational team and the legal team.

To address this challenge, organizations should implement and enforce policies that establish thresholds for when and how the legal risks related to security incidents are reported up to senior leadership. The thresholds for incident reporting may differ across disciplines, divisions or business units (e.g., legal, technical, financial) because each may be impacted by the same incident or types of incidents in different ways. Therefore, policies about reporting may also differ but should be reviewed and reconciled by an enterprise-level team in order to ensure they facilitate responsible oversight and coordination across the organization.

With respect to legal counsel, establishing ex ante clear guidelines for when and how embedded attorneys need to involve their leadership (e.g., notification, approval) is a necessary part of reaping the full benefit of in-house cybersecurity counsel. As noted above, sound legal guidance requires not only expertise and judgment but often visibility across the enterprise in order to consider all relevant facts. To ensure the greatest efficiency, the legal department should determine what kinds of incidents and operations require elevation up the chain for a proper assessment of legal risk.

Failure to establish clear guidelines about cybersecurity counsel's reporting obligations can leave them hamstrung, waiting repeatedly for evaluation and permission from their leadership and unable to provide operationally efficient guidance. In order for the organization to actually reap the intended benefits of embedded attorneys - namely, specialized and streamlined legal review at or closer to the speed of operations - attorneys must know when they can act without higher level review and authorization.

Even if the provision of legal guidance regarding a particular issue or incident does not require higher-level authorization, the General Counsel may still need to be informed of certain activities and decisions after the fact in order to fulfill her responsibility to asses and opine on the organization's overall legal risk. Given the sheer number and speed of cybersecurity operations, clarity regarding the frequency and form of senior-level notification is also critical to ensuring senior leadership receives the information they need, as well as to maximizing overall operational efficiency and cybersecurity counsel's ability to focus on ongoing operations.

In sum, in order to achieve the greatest benefits of investing in "forward-deployed" or embedded cybersecurity attorneys, organizations must responsibly empower these positions and the cross-disciplinary teams they support by implementing clear policies and responsible reporting structures. Without this clarity, embedded lawyers will not be able to provide both sound and expedient guidance - potentially doing greater harm than good.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

WeLead Class 2015-2016

Spring 2019 Training 

The monthly intensive training will be held Saturday 10 AM - 3 PM each day. All sessions will be held in the Founders Room, School of International Service, American University.


Spring 2019 Training Dates:
February 23rd
March 23rd
April 13th 

Foundation for Your Future

From day one, you will build the foundation for the AU degree program that you will begin in spring semester, because your Mentorship Program in England classes focus on skills that will advance your academics at AU. You will be enrolled in a combination of AU and BSU courses – taking classes as a cohort on BSU’s campus, while living on BSU’s campus and having full access to BSU campus activities and services.

A shaman performing a ritual on a blue sky day with Lake Titicaca in the background in Bolivia

SIS Staff

Staff Winner

"Shaman on the Isla del Sol" by Marisa Rivero
Lake Titicaca, Bolivia; 2004

A shaman performs an ancient ritual on the Isla del Sol (Island of the Sun) with Lake Titicaca in the background.

For more information, please contact: 

Phillip L. Brown
Assistant Director
Environmental Health and Safety 
Phone: 202-885-2367
Email: phil@american.edu

AU alum teaching in class

Designed for individuals with a bachelor's degree and interest in a teaching license, the MAT program

  • provides online and on-campus options, each requiring 5 semesters
  • offers 2 tracks: elementary or secondary education; see MAT Admissions & Requirements
  • does not require previous training or experience in education
  • offers Scholarships & Partnerships including City Year / AISGW, TEACH Grants, Ganek Family Mini-Grants
  • prepares graduates for direct entry into positions as classroom teacher, curriculum specialist, arts coordinator, adult educator, program head, and related careers

How to Register for Classes Webinar by Program

April 16 – April 23

You will receive an email invite after you have paid your seat deposit.

Graduate Exchange

Eligibility

Applicants must be a current graduate student at a partner institution.

  • Good academic standing with a Grade Point Average equivalent of at least a 3.0 out of 4.0 at their host institution.

How the Program Works

  • Graduate exchange students may study for one semester only.
  • Students are permitted to register for up to 9 academic credits within SIS or other AU schools, except the Washington College of Law. Registering for more than 9 credits will be at the student's expense.
  • Students will pay their home institution tuition and any relevant fees. In addition, they will pay AU's technology fee and sports center fee.
  • Health insurance is mandatory for all full-time degree, resident and international students, unless the student has comparable coverage under another health insurance plan. Exchange students will automatically be billed for university health insurance unless a waiver is submitted.
  • Students are responsible for airfare to Washington, D.C., ground transportation, school supplies, and other personal living expenses while studying at AU.
  • AU does not provide housing for graduate students. All graduate students must secure their own accommodation. Resources to locate off-campus housing are available through the Office of Housing & Dining.


How to Apply

All applicants must first be nominated by their home institution before submitting their application. You may then complete the online SIS Graduate Exchange Application. 

You will need to provide the following:

  • 500 word personal essay (details included in the online application).
  • Copy of the front page of your passport and any U.S. visas you already have.
  • Bank statement indicating that you have sufficient funds to cover expenses for the duration of your study in the U.S.
  • Résumé/CV.
  • Immunization form if you will be under the age of 26 when you begin your study at AU.
  • Official English language exam results either requested to be sent directly to SIS (TOEFL: code 5007, IELTS: select School of International Service) or verified as official with a signature from your institution's international office.
  • Verified official transcript signed by your institution's international office.

Further details regarding the program can be found on the Exchange Guide. All SIS Exchange and Dual Degree Programs are managed by the Office for International Programs (OIP). You may reach us by sending a message to sisabroad@american.edu.

Dual Masters Degree Program (DMDP)

Eligibility

  • Good academic standing with a Grade Point Average equivalent of at least a 3.0 out of 4.0 at their host institution.


How the Program Works

  • Students may transfer in up to 15 credit hours of relevant course work toward their degree at SIS.
  • AU Tuition will be waived for up to 24 credit hours. Any DMDP student who requires more than 24 credits of study or who drops a course after the AU published Add/Drop deadline and does not qualify for any refund will be responsible to pay AU tuition.
  • DMDP students will pay their home institution tuition and relevant fees in addition to the AU technology fee and sports center fee.
  • Health insurance is mandatory for all full-time degree, resident and international students, unless the student has comparable coverage under another health insurance plan. DMDP students will automatically be billed for university health insurance unless a waiver is submitted.
  • Students are responsible for airfare to Washington, D.C., ground transportation, school supplies, and other personal living expenses while studying at AU.
  • AU does not provide housing for graduate students. All graduate students must secure their own accommodation. Resources to locate off-campus housing are available through the Office of Housing & Dining.


How to Apply

All applicants must first be nominated by Korea University or Ritusmeikan University before submitting their application. You may then follow the instructions for applying as a dual degree student to SIS. Please note, DMDP applicants do not pay the application fee. In order to bypass any prompts for payment, you must indicate in your application that you will pay via check.

Once your application is complete, please send your complete application packet and supporting documents to:


For DMDP Applications from KU & RU

Jessica Kling
American University
School of International Service, Office 112K
Office of International Programs
4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20016 U.S.A.

Further details regarding the program can be found on the DMDP Guide. All SIS Exchange and Dual Degree Programs are managed by the Office for International Programs (OIP). You may reach us by sending a message to sisabroad@american.edu.

Maddie McCarthyMaddie McCarthy is a sophomore studying Interdisciplinary Studies: Communication, Legal Institutions, Economics, and Government (CLEG) in the School of Public Affairs. She is a member of Alpha Xi Delta, College Republicans, and Model United Nations. Maddie is excited to bridge the gap between political ideologies on campus by facilitating conversations where students can see past the politics in others.

Priyanka Gulati is a junior studying Political Science in the School of Public Affairs with minors in Communication and Marketing. She works in social media for a South Asian Diaspora-based startup and is the co-president of Speak Fresh, AU’s only spoken word team. Priyanka looks forward to not only creating more environments on campus for civic engagement but enriching the spaces that already exist by providing avenues for meaningful dialogue.

The Madison Prize for Constitutional Excellence

James Madison drawingAt a time when gridlock on Capitol Hill has too often replaced negotiation and public approval of Congress has reached historic lows, it is good to take notice of those who, despite the times, have worked across the aisle to resolve difficult issues. SPA’s new Madison Prize for Constitutional Excellence will honor legislators who recognize the necessity for compromise in our politics and have shown that the public interest is more important than party doctrine. The Madison Prize, endowed by former Rep. David Skaggs (D-CO) and his wife Laura Skaggs in partnership with SPA, will be awarded after the end of each two-year congressional session to recognize one Member of Congress from each major political party who best exemplifies respect for the institutional values of Congress and the need for compromise in a democratic society, traits outlined by James Madison in Federalist 10.

HOW TO PLAY


1. Grab a Game Sheet

Pick up a game sheet at an AhealthyU event or download and print your game board. Follow the instructions on the game board and participate in our different programs to build a healthy and well-balanced lifestyle.

Want to kick-start your game sheet? Register your game sheet and receive 5 point stamps!

  • Move-in Volunteers will assist with First-Year Move-in the Friday and Saturday before Welcome Week. This year we are looking for 200+ volunteers to make up our general volunteer staff. This is an excellent opportunity for organizations looking for service hours and individuals who want to welcome the Class of 2022. 


If you have any questions about the move-in volunteer position, please contact housing@american.edu.


Partnerships

Academic Institutions

Building on the breadth and depth of faculty expertise on Latin American and Latino Studies at American University, CLALS has also reached beyond campus to engage scholars from the following academic institutions, including universities and research institutes in Latin America:

Casey Culhane

Class of 2019 
Major: Biochemistry
Hometown: Walpole, MA
Favorite AU Honors Experience:
I enjoy the interdisciplinary nature of Honors. It is great to step outside of just your chosen course of study and surround yourself with people who are passionate in their disciplines.

PACK Dog

PACK: People and Animal Cardio Klub

AURecFit, in partnership with the Humane Rescue Alliance, is taking to the trails with adoptable dogs and we want you to join! 

Registration is closed for this semester. But, if you want to register for the spring, see the information below.

You must become certified first. Please begin by filling out the interest form here. There is a one-time $25 fee to become certified. This includes a t-shirt!

Each participant will complete the volunteer application online, attend a general orientation, and PACK orientation (we will help with scheduling). Participants can then go out on a weekly basis to walk or run with the dogs! Questions: Contact Lauren at lkline@american.edu.

Hannah Brown

Class of 2021 

Majors: Political Science and Spanish

Hometown: Highland, MD

Fun Fact:
I shook former President Bush's hand at the turkey pardoning ceremony when I was in elementary school. 

Two students with the Pride flag

American University Students supporting National Coming Out Day

For more information, please contact:

Leanne Wright, MPH, CSP
Assistant Director
Environmental Health and Safety
Phone: 202-885-2007
Email: pina@american.edu

Phillip L. Brown
Assistant Director
Environmental Health and Safety
Phone: 202-885-2367
Email: phil@american.edu

Research Applications & Methods Support

Contact - rsg@american.edu, 202-885-3862
Hours - Sun-Thurs: 4pm-9pm
Location - Graduate Research Center, B58
Advanced graduate student consultants can provide one-on-one help with qualitative and quantitative research methods and research projects. They can help with data analysis and visualization, or software as MATLAB, Mathematica, Qualtrics, NVivo, EViews, R, SAS, Stata, SPSS, or Tableau. Help is also available for with digital data formatting, data clean-up, recoding, matching, and merging data. The consultants can help you install and configure the Virtual Computing Lab(VCL) client and NVivo software on your laptop or access to Qualtrics.

Our affiliated faculty inlude:


Saturday, September 8

  • MA in Journalism and Digital Storytelling
  • MA in Producing for Film, TV and Video

Name: Brett Dempsey
Undergraduate Institution:
American University, BS in Biology
Advisor:
Dr. Katie DeCicco-Skinner
Research Project:
Identification of Somatic Mutations in a Tpl2 Knockout Model of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma. I am performing a Sanger sequencing analysis of normal tissue, DMBA-treated tissue, and tumor tissue from wild type and Tumor Progression Locus 2 knockout mice. Tissues were then extracted from these mice after a two-stage chemical skin cancer induction procedure was performed. I am sequencing the coding regions of HRas, Tp53, Met, and TGF-Beta genes, all of which are frequently implicated in cancer development. We have hypothesized that somatic mutations in these genes will be observed in higher frequencies in Tpl2 knockout mice and in tumor tissue compared to wild type control tissues. Furthermore, we believe that these higher rates of mutation could be causing the previously observed increase in skin cancer incidence in the knockout mice.

 

Center for Data Science

3D Data point visualizationAcross public, private, and nonprofit sectors, big data is making a big diff erence. Distinguished Professor Jeff Gill is leading SPA’s new Center for Data Science, which is working to coordinate and support empirical research across the campus by developing links with federal agencies, providing research support to faculty and graduate students, and building infrastructure to handle large and complex datasets.

There are currently no positions open at this time. Please check back regularly for opportunities at the Center for Latin American & Latino Studies.

Whether you're looking to change careers, or move up in your current field, American University's Master of Science in Measurement & Evaluation will give you the skills to systematically collect, analyze, and use data to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of projects.  

The program features:

  • 10 courses, 30 credit hours
  • Online degree with immersion options
  • Highly trained and expert faculty

Additional Networks and Resources

Schedule


Search Visual Resource Center COllections

 

Invested in Cookstoves in Kenya

Recognizing that certain emissions sources, such as air travel emissions, cannot be eliminated given our current technological limitations, and because they are necessary for the university to fulfill its mission, the Office of Sustainability invested in the Paradigm Project, an endeavor that benefits communities in Africa by empowering women, providing jobs for women, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions through reduced deforestation.

What: 

The Kogod Cybersecurity Governance Center (KCGC) will host the forum Cybersecurity and Privacy: Bridging Research and Practice on September 26, 2018, 3-5:00 p.m. in American University’s Bulter Board Room. This event will feature a keynote by Joe Valacich, Chief Science Officer of Neuro-ID and Eller Professor of Management Information Systems at University of Arizona. Professor Valacich will talk about how he has linked his research on insider threat detection with his commercialization activities. After the keynote, the forum will continue with a panel discussion on bridging research and practice in cybersecurity and privacy. Panelists include Patrick Carrick, Department of Homeland Security; Casey Evans, Kogod School of Business; Jules Polonetsky, Future of Privacy Forum; and Anthony Vance, Fox School of Business at Temple University.

Where:

American University’s Butler Board Room
Butler Pavilion, 6th Floor
4400 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC 20016
 

When:

Wednesday, September 26 from 3-5 p.m.

Parking:

We recommend that you use the Katzen Arts Center parking garage or the Sports Center parking garage. View map. 

Panelists 

Patrick Carrick Portrait

Patrick Carrick, Chief Scientist at the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate


Patrick Carrick is the Chief Scientist at the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate. As a member of the Senior Executive Service, Dr. Carrick has served as the Director for Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency (HSARPA). As the HSARPA Director, he guided the management of the national technology research and development investment for DHS. Prior to becoming part of HSARPA, Dr. Carrick was the Director of the Basic Science Program Office and the Acting Director of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, in Arlington, Virginia where he guided the management of the entire basic research investment for the Air Force. Dr. Carrick earned his PhD degree in chemistry from Rice University in 1983 and was a faculty at Mississippi State University, and Director of the Shared Laser Facility at the University of Oregon prior to joining the Department of Defense in 1989. Dr. Carrick has published more than 25 articles in peer-reviewed professional journals.

Casey Evans

Casey Evans, Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Programs, Department of Accounting and Taxation, Kogod School of Business at American University

Professor Evans is the Director of the MS in Accounting and the Graduate Certificate in Forensica Accounting programs. She is a Certified Public Accountant and a Certified Fraud Examiner and has extensive industry experience handling a range of forensic accounting issues, including fraud investigations, Securities and Exchange Commission and Department of Justice enforcement actions, financial reporting and disclosure issues, technical accounting issues, and internal control reviews.

Before joining the faculty, Evans was Senior Director of Forensic and Litigation Consulting at FTI Consulting, where she specialized in conducting complex forensic accounting and financial fraud investigations in conjunction with SEC, DOJ, and corporate audit committee inquiries. Beginning in early 2009, she was part of the team of FTI investigators responsible for investigating Bernard Madoff and Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities, one of the largest investor frauds in American history.

Evans regularly speaks to professional organizations and government entities on various forensic accounting topics. She also serves on the Board of the Greater Washington Society of CPAs.

She has been awarded Kogod’s Professor of the Year multiple times and she teaches Financial Accounting, Managerial Accounting, Forensic Accounting and Advanced Forensic Accounting. She is a Research Fellow for Kogod’s Cybersecurity Governance Center. Evans’ area of research is in fraud detection with a current focus on cyber security and cyber fraud tools.
 

Jules Polonetsky

Jules Polonetsky, CEO of the Future of Privacy Forum 


Jules Polonetsky serves as CEO of the Future of Privacy Forum[JM1] (FPF), a Washington, DC-based non-profit organization that serves as a catalyst for privacy leadership and scholarship, advancing principled data practices in support of emerging technologies. FPF is supported by the chief privacy officers of more than 130 leading companies, several foundations, as well as by an advisory board comprised of the country’s leading academics and advocates. FPF’s current projects focus on big data, mobile, location, apps, the internet of things, wearables, de-identification, connected cars and student privacy.

Jules’ previous roles have included serving as Chief Privacy Officer at AOL and at DoubleClick; as Consumer Affairs Commissioner for New York City; as an elected New York State Legislator and as a congressional staffer; and as an attorney.

He has also served on the boards of a number of privacy and consumer protection organizations, including TRUSTe, the International Association of Privacy Professionals, and the Network Advertising Initiative. Jules is a regular speaker at privacy and technology events and has testified or presented before Congressional committees and the Federal Trade Commission.

Jules is co-editor of The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Privacy, published by Cambridge University Press (2018).

More of his writing and research can be found on Google Scholar and SSRN.
 

Joseph Valacich

Joe Valacich, Eller College of Management at University of Arizona and Neuro-ID, Inc. 


Joseph (Joe) S. Valacich is the Eller Professor of MIS within the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona, a Fellow of the Association for Information Systems (2009), and is a co-founder, Chairman, and Chief Science Officer (CSO) of Neuro-ID, Inc. His primary research interests include deception detection, human-computer interaction, data visualization, cyber security, and e-business. Dr. Valacich is a prolific scholar, publishing more than 200 scholarly articles in numerous prestigious journals and conferences, including: Academy of Management Journal, Communications of the ACM, Decision Sciences, Information Systems Research, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of the AIS, Journal of MIS, MIS Quarterly, Management Science, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and many others. His scholarly work has had a tremendous impact not only on the IS field, but also on a number of other disciplines, including computer science, cognitive and social psychology, marketing, and management. In August 2018, Google Scholar lists his citation counts as more than 22,900, with an H- index of 69. He was the general conference co-chair for the 2003 International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS) and the 2012 Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS); both were held in Seattle. He is the Honorary Chair for the 2021 ICIS conference to be held in Austin, Texas.

Anthony Vance

Anthony Vance, Fox School of Business at Temple University


Anthony Vance is an associate professor and Elmer R. Deaver Research Fellow in the Department of Management Information Systems of the Fox School of Business at Temple University. He serves as the Director of the Center for Cybersecurity at the Fox School. He earned Ph.D. degrees in Information Systems from Georgia State University, USA; the University of Paris— Dauphine, France; and the University of Oulu, Finland. His previous experience includes working as a security consultant at Deloitte and as a research professor in the Information Systems Security Research Center at the University of Oulu. His research focuses on behavioral and neuroscience applications to information security. His work is published in outlets such as MIS Quarterly, Information Systems Research, Journal of Management Information Systems, Journal of the Association for Information Systems, European Journal of Information Systems, and Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI). He currently is an associate editor at MIS Quarterly and serves on the editorial board of Journal of the Association for Information Systems.

AU Memo Letterhead

Memorandum September 19, 2016

To:
American University Community
From:
Neil Kerwin, President
Subject:
Recent Events and Climate of Inclusion

In recent days, two incidents of unacceptable student behavior were reported that left our African-American students and others shaken, upset, and even feeling unsafe. The second act of misconduct involved an explicit racist incident in a residence hall. Such acts are reprehensible and are the antithesis of the values and standards we embrace as a university.

I share with many of you deep disappointment and frustration that these events have disrupted our community and challenged our efforts to build an inclusive campus culture. They simply have no place here. We will confront racist expressions with forceful condemnation and respond to discrimination with every tool at our disposal. It is incumbent on the university to respond clearly and to educate those who cause harm with their insensitivity and ignorance.

Staff have been working tirelessly and directly with students since last week, providing outreach and support, including a town hall meeting last Friday. The first incident was investigated and those involved in the misconduct have been held accountable through the student conduct process. The second is under investigation and a statement released to residents last week specifically calls for anyone with more information to contact Public Safety (dps@american.edu; 202-885-2527). The directors of Housing and Dining have written to all resident students, reminding them to live up to the community standards they participated in establishing.

There will be opportunities to discuss our expectations and our concerns during a series of events, entitled Courageous Conversations, in the weeks to come. The Center for Diversity and Inclusion, the Counseling Center, Faculty Staff Assistance Program and Kay Spiritual Life Center are places to seek support and solace. We will speak directly and listen carefully in an effort to help our community heal and overcome the hurt that has been expressed.

Do not be discouraged. We will not be dissuaded from our goal to create a more inclusive climate. Despite the efforts we have begun, there is still a great deal more to do. Given the events we have seen across our country in recent months, this work will continue for the foreseeable future.

Planted 650 Trees

Deadlines
Fall priority admission: March 1
Spring priority admission: November 1
Summer admission
Yes
Required materials
Application form and fee
Statement of purpose
Transcripts
2 letters of recommendation
GRE scores
Resume

Request Info  How to Apply

Our faculty's distinguished careers include roles within the Department of Education, consulting assignments on the Obama administration’s Reach Higher Initiative, and many other prestigious and influential positions within the field of education. They are not only exemplary instructors but also thinkers, innovators, and researchers who are helping to shape the future of education. Whether you enroll in our online or on-campus format, you can look forward to developing important and lasting mentor relationships with the professors you'll meet here. 

See more about the Teacher Education Faculty.

AU's Master of Arts in Teaching takes only five semesters to complete. The curriculum has been designed by education experts who understand that, while grounding in a theoretical framework is an important part of training teachers, it's hands-on experience in a real-life classroom setting that allows great future teachers to solidify their practical skills. For that reason, practical experience is an integral part of our program, whether you join us on campus or online.

Students choose one of two tracks: elementary (grades 1-6) or secondary (grades 7-12) education. All students start with foundational courses such as Theories of Educational Psychology and Human Development, and then go on to earn at least 39 credit hours in their chosen track.

See Admissions & Requirements.

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

History Resources

CAS Advising Staff

Make 30-minute appointments through our 24-hour scheduler for
 

  • Registration planning/clearance or references/recommendations
  • Choice of major(s), study abroad, internship, or independent studies
  • Academic program planning; planning for graduation
  • Probation or taking a leave of absence/ returning after an absence

Make an Appointment

Find us in Battelle-Tompkins, Room 100, 9:00 to 5:00, Monday through Friday, except on university holidays.

From the Tenleytown/AU Metro stop to Asbury is 1.4 miles. Heading south on Wisconsin Avenue, turn right on Nebraska Avenue (at the Tenley Campus) and continue to Ward Circle. Turn right at Massachusetts Avenue and walk along the Katzen Arts Center until you reach the stoplight at Glover Gate. Turn left to enter the main campus driveway and follow the directions (above) to the tunnel and Asbury building.

Please use the AU mobile map for directions to the Asbury Building.

Maddie Bergoon

Class of 2019

Major: International Studies major, Spanish & Statistics minors

Hometown: Houston, Texas

Fun Fact:
I want to be an astronaut!

Shadi

Class of 2020 

Major:
SIS and CLEG
Hometown: Denver, CO 

Fun Fact:
I have tri-citizenship! Reach out to me to find out where!

Chris Abbott

Class of 2019 
Major: Economics and International Service
Hometown: Albuquerque, NM
Fun Fact:
My parents let my then three year old sister name me, and since she really liked Winnie the Pooh at that age, she named me after Christopher Robin.

AU2023

In five years, AU will have developed and launched strategies for lifelong learning, involving both digital and face-to-face components, for both degree and nondegree programs. The programs resulting from these strategies will be of high quality and will have generated significant additional revenue on an annual basis. AU also will have identified a structure for successful oversight, management, and operation of these programs.

Class of 2018 

Major: International Studies & Communications Studies
Hometown: Upper Darby, PA

Fun Fact:
Pretty much everyone who knows me knows that Tina Fey went to my high school and groans every time I bring it up. To keep it brief, this means I get Christmas cards from her brother and the real Glenn Cocco.

Reunion of PGAE faculty, students, and alumni at the International Association for Feminist Economics, Seoul, South Korea 2017.

The Care Economy and Gender-Aware Macroeconomic Modeling for Policy Analysis

The Hewlett Foundation-funded Care Economy and Gender-Sensitive Macroeconomic Modeling for Policy Analysis Project works to better understand, capture, and model women and men's role and time in care provisioning (for children, the sick and disabled, and the elderly) in order to promote gender-sensitive economic and social policies that foster inclusive growth and gender equality. Country efforts to reduce inequality in economic outcomes, promote sustainable development, and plan for demographic shifts are undermined by ignoring the paid and unpaid care sectors in macroeconomic models and policy design. The GAM project addresses this knowledge gap by producing new research that incorporates the care economy and gender-disaggregated activities explicitly into macroeconomic modelling, which can deepen policy analyses and sharpen their impact. Care-focused macromodels, care economy accounting, and policy simulations will show the feasibility and importance of integrating paid and unpaid care sectors into macroeconomic policy design and analyses.

AU2023

In five years, students will demonstrate greater satisfaction with teaching, learning, and mentoring, including the AU Core Curriculum, as evidenced through NSSE findings and other surveys. Student retention rates will have improved, in part due to the focused efforts on faculty-student research opportunities.

AU Memo Letterhead

Memorandum November 11, 2016

To:
American University Community
From:
Neil Kerwin, President
Subject:
Setting the Standard for Discourse and Understanding

As protests formed in cities and campuses across the United States, students convened on Wednesday on the steps of the Mary Graydon Center in an impromptu gathering to express a range of reactions to the culmination of a very divisive presidential election. Public Safety officers and campus administrators were present to ensure that participants were safe and that all rights were preserved. That wasn't easy, but I commend their professionalism and dedication. Despite their best efforts the situation became highly contentious. Inflammatory language and actions were evident. I am disappointed that an opportunity to express deeply felt concerns about the results and implications of the election became an incident that has further divided members of our community and reflected poorly on our university.

Universities have always been places that respect a range of ideas, unfettered discussion, and respectful debate. American University upholds institutional values of free expression and mutual respect for people representing diverse points of view. If we want others to understand and listen to our perspective, we must allow others to safely express theirs. We can expect expressions of frustration and fear, pride and patriotism, among others. We should strive to explore their roots and examine them in depth. Let me state-again-that our commitment to diversity and inclusion is unshakable. Those who believe they are not afforded the respect and understanding they deserve must be able to express their views and we must respond if we are to be the institution we aspire to be. Only a climate for open discussion and healthy debate for all viewpoints will advance that goal.

To that end, I am compelled to comment on one particularly troubling aspect of Wednesday's event. The university in no way condones, promotes, or supports the burning of the American flag. Yes, the Supreme Court made it quite clear that this specific act is protected expression under the First Amendment. But, it is also an act of profound disrespect that left many members of our community outraged, deeply offended, and disappointed. It generated a great amount of negative reaction from a number of quarters, including our alumni and parents. The nature of the act and reactions to it can put members of the community at risk of injury. In our maintenance of an environment of free and open expression, we-as a private institution-must be clear that the safety of our community is of paramount importance.

I also know that as a result of the election, many in our community are fearful because of their religious beliefs, skin color, national origin, or sexual identity and expression. The university has public safety, health care professionals, and ministerial support to assist anyone who feels threatened.

The question for our community now is, what role will American University play in setting a higher standard? Our name carries special responsibility not only to respect the rights enshrined in our Constitution, but to use our freedoms wisely and judiciously to create an environment where all can be heard, understood, and free to safely contribute to healthy debate and discussion.

The weeks and months ahead will no doubt be challenging. The lasting effects of the divisive national election, and upcoming transition present multiple opportunities for interaction and exchange, and I hope, to learn from past experiences and conduct ourselves on the highest possible level. A good start was the excellent discussion yesterday, in which six members of our faculty offered their perspective and expertise on the election to an engaged, standing room only crowd of faculty, staff, and students. Clearly that discussion was needed and welcome.

Now I ask every member of our community to help maintain that standard of civil discourse more broadly at our university.

Faith Lewis

Class of 2020

Major: International Studies and Political Science
Hometown: Agoura Hills, CA

Fun Fact:
I lived in Australia!

Dana Stevenson

Class of 2020

Majors: History and Secondary Education

Hometown: Lumberton, NJ

Fun Fact:
I have a twin sister!

Week 4: September 24-30

Week 3: September 17-23

Fall 2017: AUx1 Instructors and Peer Leaders

Study Abroad Scholarships

AU Abroad and the School of Public Affairs offer scholarship opportunities to AU students to help subsidize travel- and research-related costs for AU study abroad programs.

Religious Organizations

Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism

2027 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-387-2800
E-mail: rac@rac.org
www.rac.org

Sixth & I Historic Synagogue in Downtown DC

600 I St, NW, Washington, DC 20001
Phone: 202-408-3100
E-mail: akemler@sixthandI.org
www.sixthandi.org

Social Service Agencies

District of Columbia Jewish Community Center

1529 16th St, NW, Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-518-9400 Fax: 202-518-9420
www.edcjcc.org

Jewish Community Center of Greater Washington

6125 Montrose Road, Rockville, MD 20852
Phone: 301-881-0100
Email: See website for staff directory
www.benderjccgw.org

The Association of Jewish Aging Services

2519 Connecticut Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20008
Phone: 202-543-7500
ajas.org

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

Visiting AU? Let us know!

We would like to meet you while on campus and share more information about the Mentorship Program. Contact us at 202-895-4936 or mentorship@american.edu. You can also sign-up for an American University tour and information session.

Name: Nicole Bonan
Undergraduate Institution:
American University, BS Biochemistry
Advisor: Dr. Katie DeCicco-Skinner
Research Project: Tpl2 is a kinase in the MAPK signal transduction pathway. Mice that are devoid of Tpl2 (Tpl2 knockout mice) are more prone to develop a form of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. My research investigates how Tpl2 associates with other genes such as those in the MET signaling pathway and how this contributes to skin cancer formation and metastasis. Ultimately, we hope to better understand how Tpl2 works so that treatments targeting the kinase can be used more effectively.

Pay Period Hiring Paperwork Due Employee Information Changes Due All Leave Report Approvals Due Pay Day
Apr 01 - Apr 30 Apr 09 Apr 11 May 01 Apr 30
May 01 - May 31 Apr 30* May 02* Jun 01 May 31
Jun 01 - Jun 30 Jun 04 Jun 06 Jul 02 Jun 29
Jul 01 - Jul 31 Jul 02 Jul 04 Aug 01 Jul 31
Aug 01 - Aug 31 Aug 13 Aug 15 Sep 03 Aug 31
Sep 01 - Sep 30 Sep 10 Sep 12 Oct 01 Sep 28
Oct 01 - Oct 31 Oct 08 Oct 10 Nov 01 Oct 31
Nov 01 - Nov 30 Nov 05 Nov 07 Dec 03 Nov 30
Dec 01 - Dec 31 Dec 03 Dec 05 Jan 02 Dec 31
Jan 01 - Jan 31 Jan 02 Jan 02 Feb 01 Jan 31
Feb 01 - Feb 28 Jan 28 Jan 30 Mar 01 Feb 28
Mar 01 - Mar 31 Mar 11 Mar 13 Apr 01 Mar 29
Apr 01 - Apr 30 Apr 08 Apr 10 May 01 Apr 30
May 01 - May 31 May 06 May 08 Jun 01 May 31
The Caption is the Table Heading. To hide for sighted users use class="sr-only" on it.
Undergraduate Students Full-Time (12-17 credit hours) Part-Time

This is the table footer

9:30-10:00 am

Registration

10:00-10:15 am

Welcome from Assoc. Dean Wendy Boland

MOCK CLASSES | Choose one from the following:

10:30 am-12:00 pm

Negotiations
Prof. Alexandra Mislin

Organizational Behavior
Prof. Mark Clark

12:00-1:00 pm

Lunch with Current Students

BREAKOUT SESSION I | Choose three from the following:

1:00-1:30 pm

MBA Program Overview

MS Programs Overviews

 

1:45-2:15 pm

Financial Aid

Biz@AU Overview/Class Demo

Application Workshops (Campus)

MS Programs Follow Up Convos

Demystifying the GMAT

KSB & Campus Tour

 

2:15-2:45 pm

KSB & Campus Tour

Biz@AU Overview/Class Demo

Application Workshops (Campus)

Demystifying the GMAT

Financial Aid

The Caption is the Table Heading. To hide for sighted users use class="sr-only" on it.
Undergraduate Students Full-Time (12-17 credit hours) Part-Time

This is the table footer

9:30-10:00 am

Registration

10:00-10:15 am

Welcome from Assoc. Dean Wendy Boland

MOCK CLASSES | Choose one from the following:

10:30 am-12:00 pm

Negotiations
Prof. Alexandra Mislin

Organizational Behavior
Prof. Mark Clark

12:00-1:00 pm

Lunch with Current Students

BREAKOUT SESSION I | Choose three from the following:

1:00-1:30 pm

MBA Program Overview

MS Programs Overviews

 

1:45-2:15 pm

Financial Aid

Biz@AU Overview/Class Demo

Application Workshops (Campus)

MS Programs Follow Up Convos

Demystifying the GMAT

KSB & Campus Tour

 

2:15-2:45 pm

KSB & Campus Tour

Biz@AU Overview/Class Demo

Application Workshops (Campus)

Demystifying the GMAT

Financial Aid

News and Updates

Required Harassment & Discrimination Prevention Training for All Full-Time and Part-Time Staff 

As part of the new Inclusive Excellence plan, the Harassment & Discrimination Prevention course is required for all staff and leaders, even if you were recently hired or have completed previous versions. This required training is due by Friday, December 21, 2018.



Directions to Campus

Hourly parking is available in the garage under the Katzen Art Center. Campus can be reached by DC Metro rail and bus, or by using the AU Shuttle Bus.




Philanthropy and service are important to the fraternity and sorority community. Each chapter holds events throughout the year to raise money and awareness for a variety of philanthropic causes. Chapters also participate in hands-on service in the community. Each fall, chapters hold their annual philanthropic and service events
Leadership development is an advantage of fraternity and sorority life. Many programs and events are held throughout the year to support students' leadership development. Additionally, fraternity and sorority members have the opportunity to hold leadership positions, participate in committees, and plan events within their chapters and councils


SPA Hosts Five Research Journals

SPA now hosts five journals that span public affairs, government, and law subject matter. Our faculty expertise is a draw for these journals, and we are honored to play a leadership role for these excellent publications.

American Journal of Political Science
Editor, SPA Professor Jan Leighley

Congress & the Presidency
Editor, SPA Assistant Professor Jeffrey Crouch

Journal of Behavioral Public Administration
Editor-in-Chief, SPA Distinguished Scholar in Residence Kenneth Meier

Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
Editor-in-Chief, SPA Professor Erdal Tekin

Political Analysis
Editor-in-Chief, SPA Distinguished Professor Jeff Gill

Interim Dean Christine BN Chin poses in the Atrium at the School of International Service.

Welcome! I'm glad you are interested in learning more about the School of International Service (SIS). Our goal is to prepare active citizens who are committed to be of service in addressing the most pressing issues of our time. Our major programs of study equip emerging global leaders with intercultural competence, strong analytical and critical thinking skills, and professional expertise in a specialized subject area. Our location, a short Metro ride from the White House, nearby embassies, and agencies, puts us in close proximity to local, national, and international decision makers.

The inclusive SIS community is comprised of four important groups of people: a multi-disciplinary faculty–dedicated teachers and innovative scholars working at the forefront of their research fields; a committed staff ensuring that students can take full advantage of all SIS has to offer, including events with global leaders and robust career and academic advising; a highly-connected global alumni network of 20,000 people; and our diverse students, who come to us from across the country and around the world. This is who we are: a community working toward a common purpose of leadership through service.

I invite you to explore SIS through our website and to visit me and the rest of the SIS community, including staff, faculty, and students, on our beautiful campus in Northwest Washington, D.C. We look forward to meeting you.

Christine BN Chin, Dean
School of International Service

In memory of Ion Sterpan, 2017 AUCI Fellow.

AU2023

In five years, AU will have launched major efforts in every area of strategic focus that will have increased the university’s reputation as a leader in each one. These efforts will have enhanced AU’s overall reputation as an institution that cultivates top-flight, cross-disciplinary research to address some of the nation’s and the world’s most important policy issues. The centers, both in the areas of strategic focus and other areas, will have attracted increased external support, including from government, nonprofit, and private sector sources, and AU will have demonstrated increased ability to compete for grants that support research at the $1 million level and above. We will see greater student interest in these fields, as demonstrated by increased enrollment in graduate programs in these areas. Recruitment and retention of outstanding senior faculty in the areas of strategic focus will have improved. We will also see improved rates and placements of scholarly publications in the areas of strategic focus, as measured by impact factors, press prestige, awards recognizing achievements in the arts and humanities, and other outcomes.


Words of Sacred Tradition

Texts Used in the Interfaith Chapel Service

Psalm 133 • A Song of Ascents. How very good and pleasant it is when kindred live together in unity! It is like the precious oil on the head, running down upon the beard, on the beard of Aaron, running down over the collar of his robes. It is like the dew of Hermon, which falls on the mountains of Zion. For there the LORD ordained his blessing, life forevermore.

Qur'an 49:13 • O mankind! We created you from a single (pair) of a male and female, and made you into nations and tribes, that you may know each other (not that you may despise each other). Verily, the most honored of you in the sight of God is the one who is the most righteous of you. And God has full knowledge and is well acquainted (with all things).

James 3:13-17 • If you are wise and understand God's ways, prove it by living an honorable life, doing good works with the humility that comes from wisdom. But if you are bitterly jealous and there is selfish ambition in your heart, don't cover up the truth with boasting and lying. For jealousy and selfishness are not God's kind of wisdom. Such things are earthly, unspiritual, and demonic. For wherever there is jealousy and selfish ambition, there you will find disorder and evil of every kind. But the wisdom from above is first of all pure. It is also peace loving, gentle at all times, and willing to yield to others. It is full of mercy and the fruit of good deeds. It shows no favoritism and is always sincere.

Story Movements logo and poster

Story MovementsMarch 1-2 
Katzen Arts Center

Registration required.

The Center for Media & Social Impact is thrilled to announce the registration for Story Movements, our convening focused on media, storytelling and social justice. This is the re-launch of our successful Media That Matters conference that brought together filmmakers, activists, scholars, communicators, and others engaged in media and social change for more than a decade.

Click here to know more about the exciting lineup of speakers and the agenda for the convening here.

What is Story Movements?

Story Movements is a catalytic two-day convening that examines platforms and genres of civic media storytelling through the lens of social justice and social inequality. From documentary film to investigative journalism to virtual reality to community-shaped storytelling activism, the convening examines and captures the current and future-looking moment in story-led demands for social change. Through panels and discussions, the convening looks through the lens of contemporary themes of social inequality and injustice to ask and answer:

What works? How can genres of civic, justice-oriented storytelling work with one another?

The convening responds to the vitality of the moment in civic media platforms and stories, as well as the urgency of social justice and inequality, from racial injustice to gender-based violence to poverty and more. Story Movements is supported by our presenting funder, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Adult Education and Learning

ITEP is currently recruiting students for Spring 2017 and Fall 2018 admission. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

Students interested in learning about ITEP are invited to attend the College of Arts and Sciences Graduate Studies Open Houses offered once each fall and spring semester. To learn more, email casgrad@american.edu.

We are also happy to schedule personal visits for any individuals interested in learning more but unable to attend an open house. To plan your visit, email itep@american.edu.

Campaigns, Elections, Polling, & Political Branding

Degree Requirements

  • 57 credit hours of approved graduate coursework with a
    cumulative grade point average of 3.00
  • Students must complete 9 credit hours in the education core courses, 12 credit hours in secondary education, 6 credit hours of student teaching, 3 credit hours of electives, 9 credit hours in peace and conflict resolution core courses to receive the MAT.
  • Students must complete 9 credit hours in peace and conflict resolution core courses, 3 credit hours in economics, 6 credit hours in methodology, 6 credit hours of electives, 3 credit hours in a capstone experience, and 12 credit hours in the education core/secondary education track to receive the MA in International Peace and Conflict Resolution.
  • In addition to intensive coursework and student teaching placements, students are also required to participate in an educational internship program. These field placements are carefully supervised and coordinated to meet state certification requirements.
  • SIS Capstone experience: demonstration of critical thinking, research and writing skills through completion of a master's thesis, substantial research paper requirement, or practicum. All courses taken to fulfill this requirement must be passed with a grade of B or better.
    Thesis: 6 credit hours of thesis credit and submission of the thesis
    Substantial research paper requirement: 3 credit hours
    Practicum: 3 credit hours
  • Evidence of professional experience in the field: Relevant internship or work experience must be certified.
  • Proficiency in a modern foreign language
  • Research competence in English and another language relevant to the student's career objectives must be certified.
  • Comprehensive examination for MAT
  • Completion of the Praxis II Exam prior to graduation

Course Requirements

Education Core (9 credit hours)

  • EDU-521 Foundations of Education (3)
  • EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for Exceptional Children (3) or EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionalities: The Arts in Special Education (3)
  • EDU-620 Theories of Educational Psychology and Human Development (3)

Secondary Education Track (12 credit hours)

  • EDU-520 Reading, Writing, and Literature across the Curriculum (3)
  • EDU-522 Principles of Effective Methods and Instruction (3)
  • EDU-540 Methods and Materials in Secondary Education (3) (or other approved methods courses)
  • EDU-662 Classroom Management (3)

Education Elective (3 credit hours)

  • 3 credit hours of approved elective coursework in education

Student Teaching (6 credit hours)

  • EDU-699 Student Teaching Seminar in Professional Practice (6)

Peace and Conflict Resolution (9 credit hours)

  • SIS-606 Culture and Peace and Conflict Resolution: Alternatives to Violence (3)
  • SIS-607 Peace Paradigms (3)
  • SIS-609 Conflict Analysis and Resolution: Theory and Practice (3)

Economics (3 credit hours)

  • ECON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) or SIS-673 Comparative Political Economy (3) or an approved course in economics (3)

Social Science Research Methodology (6 credit hours)

  • SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in International Affairs (3) or SIS-619 Special Studies in International politics: Advances Statistics, Research Design, and Research Methods for International Affairs (3)
  • SIS-612 Research Seminar in Peace and Conflict Resolution (3) or SIS-639 Selected Topics in International Conflict Resolution Skills (1-3) (total of 3 credit hours) or other approved course work (3)

SIS Electives (6 credit hours)

  • 6 credit hours selected from skills workshops, internship for credit, master's thesis requirement, or other elective courses from School of International Service

Capstone Experience (3 credit hours)

  • SIS-797 Master's Thesis Supervision (3-6) (may include 3 elective credit hours) or Substantial research paper or practicum requirement

Career Development

Visiting AU? Let us know!

We would like to meet you while on campus and share more information about the Mentorship Program. Contact us at 202-895-4936 or mentorship@american.edu. You can also sign-up for an American University tour and information session.

literature

Rachel Louise Snyder won the prestigious J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award, for her new manuscript, "No Visible Bruises."

Ian Jehle: Dynamical Systems, American University Museum Opening Reception

Saturday, November 10, 6:00-9:00
Join us for the opening of Dynamical Systems, an exhibition by Adjunct Professorial Lecturer Ian Jehle. Jehle is currently teaching Artist's Perspective: Drawing and is the faculty mentor for the Undergraduate Student Art Guild.

Graduate MFA Open Studios

Katzen Art Center Saturday, November 10, 6:00-9:00
Katzen Art Center, 2nd Floor
Come see our MFA students in their studios after or before taking a trip to the American University Museum opening.

Faculty Director

Amanda "Lily" Kaufmann

Lily Kaufmann earned her BA in Psychology from Bard College in 2012. She then spent several years at the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Nicotine Addiction (CIRNA) at the University of Pennsylvania, where she coordinated three randomized, placebo-controlled trials examining the effectiveness of medication and counseling for smoking cessation among individuals with cancer, HIV/AIDS, and major depressive disorder. Lily joined the AU Clinical Psychology PhD program in 2015; her research interests broadly include motivation and processes of behavior change. She recently completed a master’s thesis examining motivation to quit, smoking behavior, and beliefs about smoking vs. abstinence among adult daily smokers. Lily is currently an extern with Neuropsychology Associates of Fairfax; she has previously completed externships with the Greenbelt CARES family therapy program and the Washington DC VA Medical Center substance abuse rehabilitation program.

Emmanuelle Palikuca

Class of 2019 
Major: Business Administration with a specialization in Global Social Entrepreneurship

Fun Fact:
I've been a vegetarian since I was born and have never tried meat

Chris Abbott

Class of 2019 
Major: Economics and International Service
Hometown: Albuquerque, NM

Fun Fact:
My parents let my then three year old sister name me, and since she really liked Winnie the Pooh at that age, she named me after Christopher Robin.

 

Still have questions? Send us an email: econ@american.edu

Entrance Semesters
Fall, spring, summer.
Application Deadlines
Fall priority admissions, March 1; applications on a rolling basis until August 1.
Spring priority admissions, November 1; applications on a rolling basis until December 1.
Summer admission: May 1
Additional Requirements
Statement of Purpose
Transcripts
2 Letters of Recommendation
Resume
Praxis Core scores (Passing scores by DC standards on Praxis Core exam: Reading 156, Writing 162, Math 150).
Application
Online Application

Our MA in Economics is an applied, policy-oriented 30-36 credit program designed to ensure that our graduates make an impact by developing these three critical skills:

  • Use economic theory to explain outcomes and make informed predictions
  • Analyze data to rigorously answer questions, such as how specific policies will affect markets
  • Convey economic concepts and findings to a wide audience.

Coursework will prepare you to interpret economic models, test hypotheses, and analyze human and organizational behavior to make a positive impact on society.

Students can choose from five distinct tracks withing the program: general economics, development economics, gender analysis in economics, financial economic policy, and applied economics (online only).

Complete Degree and Course Requirements

History

Justin Jacobs published the book Indiana Jones in History: From Pompeii to the Moon (Pulp Hero Press, 2017). He talked with Archaeology Podcast Network about his book and shared his thoughts on how director Steven Spielberg should cast the fifth film in the franchise slated for release in 2020.

25Live: Space Requests

25Live is the web based software used to request space reservations around campus. A valid AU username and password is required to request space; new users will need to complete training before they can request space.

Outside groups will need to have an AU host or contact the office of University Event Scheduling for an external hosted contract


Visit 25Live

Closed Captioning Requests

The ASAC currently supports closed captioning requests for accommodation purposes only. If there is a student in your class with an approved accommodation that pertains to accessible media, all media shown in class, or required to be viewed outside of class, must be accessible to the student. Requests for closed captioning must be made at least two weeks in advance.

The ASAC wants to make sure that all students have equal access to the curriculum being taught and is here to assist in the process. We recommend that you begin by checking with the Library's Media Services department to see if they have the title(s) you plan to use. If they do, place the captioned/subtitled copies on reserve. The collection can be searched at: AU Media Catalog

If you do not see the title you need, you can request that Media Services order it for you at: Media Purchase Request

This service should be used first and before downloading videos from the internet.

If you are not able to find what you need through Media Services, please complete a Closed Caption Request Form for each item you plan on using during the semester. Do not hesitate to reach out to the Assistive Technology Specialist in the ASAC, if you have any questions.

Closed Captioning Request Form

If you have a request that is not for a specific accommodation please contact the Assistive Technology Specialist at atspecialist@american.edu or 202-885-3360. 

Additional Note

If you are utilizing Kaltura in Blackboard please be sure to tag your video with CCR (Closed Caption Request) so your video can be located by AT staff once your request has been submitted. Faculty that have not used Blackboard Media please be sure to go into Blackboard and click on "My Media" so that the video's can be provided to you. If you do not use Blackboard please contact the AT Specialist.

 
 

Accessible Text Requests

online request form

Students with alternative text accommodations can request for their textbooks to be converted into accessible formats. Please submit such requests as soon as possible.

  • When purchasing course materials, prioritize electronic versions whenever possible, as these should already be readable by screen reader software
  • Provide proof of purchases for every textbook you wish to have converted
  • Textbooks that do not have electronic versions available must be cut and scanned to create an accessible digital copy
  • Identify textbooks by checking the University Bookstore:

Search By Course

Please note that textbooks must be purchased or rented before an accessible text request can be placed. To request course materials in an accessible format, please fill out the form below:

Alternative Text Request Form

Culturally Responsive Evaluation

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Center members at computer with neurons on the screen

AU's Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, established in 2012, provides a unique interdisciplinary research and training environment that promotes excellence in the study of brain function and its manifestation in behavior.

The Center strives to support neuroscience research efforts and promote collaborative interactions among neuroscientists as well as scientists from other disciplines. The Center also provides core research facilities for neuroscience research faculty and scientists from other disciplines.

Related Degrees and Programs

Top-notch, face-to-face writing help is available right here on campus at the AU Writing Center. However, Purdue's Online Writing Lab offers a grammar hotline and handouts to help with grammar and style. They will also answer one-time e-mail questions from non-Purdue students.

MLA Style for the Internet gives you the official word on MLA citation from the Modern Language Association itself. While the Department of Literature and most of the College of Arts and Sciences use MLA, many departments use the American Psychological Association style manual.

For some traditional sources that have stood the test of time, check out William Strunk, Jr.'s Elements of Style and the Merriam-Webster dictionary and thesaurus on-line. College Writing students and others wrestling with writing and research questions will also find the official website for the program’s handbook, Keys for Writers, useful.

installation, Attie

Shimon Attie
Installation view brick by brick
1995
Ectacolor Photograph
Gift of Donald Rothfeld

Radar, Ophir

Gilad Ophir
Radar

1998
Photograph
Gift of Donald Rothfeld

TwoHues, Neustein

Joshua Neustein
Two Hues of H

2001
India ink on paper
Gift of Donald Rothfeld

SoleSurvivor, Kun

Shay Kun
Sole Survivor

2008
Oil on canvas
Gift of Donald Rothfeld

Untitled, Kuper

Roi Kuper
Untitled

2003
Color Photograph II/V
Gift of Donald Rothfeld

Brazil and Global Liberal Order Main Image

Brazil has overcome a plethora of domestic challenges over the past generation and risen to become the seventh largest economy and fourth largest democracy in the world - yet its rise challenges the conventional wisdom that capitalist democracies will necessarily converge to become faithful adherents of a U.S.-led global liberal order. Indeed, Brazil demonstrates that middle powers, even those of a deeply democratic bent, may offer important challenges to prevailing conceptions of the world order, differing in their views of what democracy means on the global stage and how international relations should be conducted among sovereign nations. For Brazil, successful diplomacy involves an increased voice for the developing world, greater accountability in multilateral institutions, and a desire to reduce emphasis on coercive instruments.

Recognizing the significance of Brazil's emergence and its changing international role, CLALS has teamed with American University's School of International Service and the Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV) to study the implications of Brazil's changing role in global affairs. A jointly-sponsored workshop in Washington, DC in September 2013 brought together experts from the two universities to debate their ongoing research on the topic. Their productive collaboration resulted in a series of wide-ranging essays that comprise a book entitled Brazil on the Global Stage: Power, Ideas, and the Liberal International Order (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015).

The book is co-edited by Professors Matthew Taylor and Oliver Stuenkel, of AU and FGV respectively, with contributions from eight faculty from the two institutions, as well as experts from the Washington community. The study offers a general evaluation of Brazil's stance on the global order, while also addressing its postures on specific aspects of foreign relations, including trade, foreign and environmental policy, humanitarian intervention, nuclear proliferation and South-South relations, among other topics. The authors argue from a variety of perspectives that, even as Brazil seeks greater integration and recognition within the prevailing global liberal order, it also brings challenges to the status quo that are emblematic of the tensions accompanying the rise to prominence of a number of middle powers in an increasingly multipolar world system.

AU's Master of Arts in Teaching takes only five semesters to complete. The curriculum has been designed by education experts who understand that, while grounding in a theoretical framework is an important part of training teachers, it's hands-on experience in a real-life classroom setting that allows great future teachers to solidify their practical skills. For that reason, practical experience is an integral part of our program, whether you join us on campus or online.

Students choose one of two tracks: elementary (grades 1-6) or secondary (grades 7-12) education. All students start with foundational courses such as Theories of Educational Psychology and Human Development, and then go on to earn at least 39 credit hours in their chosen track.

See Admissions & Requirements.

Our faculty's distinguished careers include roles within the Department of Education, consulting assignments on the Obama administration’s Reach Higher Initiative, and many other prestigious and influential positions within the field of education. They are not only exemplary instructors but also thinkers, innovators, and researchers who are helping to shape the future of education. Whether you enroll in our online or on-campus format, you can look forward to developing important and lasting mentor relationships with the professors you'll meet here. 

See more about the Teacher Education Faculty.

The DC Area Survey

Introduction

Change occurs constantly in metropolitan areas. Yet there is surprisingly little research infrastructure to measure how people make sense of and react to those changes. This gap in scholarship deprives policymakers and communities of knowledge that could inform development strategies and civic initiatives designed to make metropolitan areas more dynamic and inclusive. Under the auspices of the Metropolitan Policy Center in its School of Public Affairs, American University is launching the annual DC Area Survey (DCAS) to study neighborhood and resident well-being in the Washington, DC (DC) metropolitan area.

The DCAS will focus each year on priority themes in strategically selected types of neighborhoods. The 2016 pilot survey concentrates on attachment to place, health, safety, trust in local organizations, and governance, and will focus on the experiences of DC area residents in two relatively new types of neighborhoods: Latino neighborhoods and "global neighborhoods."

Latino neighborhoods exist all over the DC metropolitan area. Many are in DC but many more are in the Maryland and Northern Virginia suburbs. Immigration from Central America and the increasing cost of housing in gentrifying DC neighborhoods are reshaping where Latinos reside and how they experience life in the DC area.

"Global neighborhoods" appeared in the past 20 years. These racially integrated neighborhoods reflect the growing diversity of the DC metropolitan area. This pilot study will be the first of its kind nationally to survey residents of these global neighborhoods.

Results from this pilot will inform numerous research initiatives led by American University faculty and provide insights that will be shared with stakeholders throughout the metropolitan area. The inaugural DCAS will also serve as a baseline to explore more and different types of neighborhoods in the DC area in the coming years.

Background & Significance

One feature of social change in post-Civil Rights American society is the rise of new and more complicated forms of racial integration. Research is needed to better understand the implications of this neighborhood compositional change on individual and social well-being. Latinos have become the largest minority group in the United States and Latino neighborhoods have dispersed throughout metropolitan areas. Most are now in the suburbs, a result, in part, of rising housing costs in the central city. Most research on immigrant incorporation and assimilation is based on urban ethnic enclaves, but the dispersion of Latino neighborhoods leads to questions about the applicability of that research in suburban settings. While we would expect some experiences to be similar, the spatial and organizational context of suburbs might lead neighborhood social process to evolve in unique ways.

Truly integrated "global neighborhoods" have never before existed in American history. These are neighborhoods that have a substantial proportion of Whites, Blacks, Latinos, and Asians. They are the fastest-growing type of neighborhood in American metropolitan areas and, by one measure [ http://www.s4.brown.edu/us2010/Data/Report/globalfinal2.pdf], the most common type of neighborhood racial composition. As these neighborhoods have emerged, however, we know very little about how their residents perceive the processes of change occurring in their neighborhoods. The novelty of these neighborhoods could reflect a potential future of sustained integration or, more pessimistically, give rise to racial tensions that could emerge in the 21st century. In light of these changes to the DC metropolitan landscape, we will investigate the following four research questions in this pilot study. Each will contribute to innovative academic research as well as provide useful data to residents, local governments, businesses, and non-profits in the Washington, DC area.

  1. How attached are residents to their neighborhoods?
  2. How is health related to neighborhood environments in Latino and global communities?
  3. How are neighborhoods associated with crime and victimization?
  4. To what extent do residents trust local organizations and local government?

Approach & Methodology

This DC Area Pilot Survey will sample from Washington, DC and the surrounding counties of Montgomery and Prince George's in Maryland and Arlington in Virginia.

  • We define Latino neighborhoods as areas that were not already defined as global neighborhoods where at least one quarter of residents are Latino.
  • For the purposes of this study, we define global neighborhoods as those in which Whites, Blacks, Latinos, and Asians all represent at least 10 percent of neighborhood residents and no group is a majority.

The sample will be drawn using address-based sampling and administered through the mail to approximately 9,600 addresses. It will ask questions across five domains: neighborhood perceptions, health, safety, institutional trust, and governance. These domains are central to understanding the influence of neighborhoods on the lives of residents.

The Project Team

This cross-disciplinary research effort involves participants from four Schools and Colleges at American University. The list below includes the American University faculty involved in this investigation.

Michael Bader (Principal Investigator) is a sociologist who studies how neighborhoods have changed since Civil Rights Legislation passed in the 1960s.

School of Public Affairs

  • Khaldoun AbouAssi, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Administration and Policy
  • Lynn Addington, Associate Professor, Department of Justice Law & Criminology
  • Lewis Faulk, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Administration and Policy
  • Eric Hershberg, Director, Center for Latin American and Latino Studies, Department of Government
  • Derek Hyra, Associate Professor, Department of Public Administration and Policy
  • Vicky Wilkins, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, Department of Public Administration and Policy
  • Matthew Wright, Assistant Professor, Department of Government

College of Arts & Sciences

School of International Service

Kogod School of Business

Publication & Dissemination

Academic Publications. The data from this survey will provide the first ever representative estimates of neighborhood perceptions, health, safety, and trust in global neighborhoods across a major metropolitan area. It will also be among the few to have done so in Latino neighborhoods in both suburban and urban environments. Given the cross-disciplinary backgrounds of the investigators, we anticipate that academic papers will be written for academic journals in sociology, criminology, psychology, public health, demography, economics, and marketing.

Public Dissemination. In addition to scholarly publications, the investigators are committed to disseminating the results to community groups and policy makers throughout the D.C. area. The research will be generalizable to residents living in global neighborhoods and Latino enclaves, so dissemination efforts will target stakeholders in those neighborhoods. These include non- governmental organizations, county and city councils, and community groups.

Next Steps

The results of the survey will inform numerous ongoing research initiatives, including:

  1. " Neighborhood Processes in an Era of Immigration and Integration." AU faculty will conduct an in-depth analysis of the influence of neighborhood conditions on resident health and well-being in the DC area. To our knowledge, no statistically generalizable studies have focused specifically on the influence of neighborhoods in newly integrated "global neighborhoods" and very few have studied the processes of integration and assimilation in American suburbs. This line of work will establish a precedent for analogous research elsewhere while supplying much needed information about the DC area.
  2. Annual DC Area Survey. AU's Metropolitan Policy Center will raise resources to conduct a more comprehensive DC Area Survey annually. Future iterations of the DCAS will endeavor to sample additional neighborhood types throughout the Washington, D.C. area to better understand how distinct neighborhood compositions relate to resident perceptions of health and well-being. The DCAS will become a signature metropolitan wide survey that provides novel information on the changing patterns of urban and suburban neighborhood contexts and their influence on people's lives.

DC Area Neighborhood Map

Washington, D.C. Area Neighborhood Racial Composition Types

Criminal Justice


One-on-One Investment Counseling Sessions Schedule

One-on-one financial planning consultations for Fidelity and TIAA are available at the following dates. All meetings will take place at the 3201 New Mexico Ave office between 9 am - 4 pm in Room 280T.

Fidelity:

  • Thursday January 18
  • Thursday, February 8
  • Tuesday, February 27

To schedule a consultation, please visit https://nb.fidelity.com/public/nb/default/fort.

TIAA:

  • Wednesday, January 24
  • Wednesday February 7
  • Wednesday, February 28

To schedule a consultation, please visit https://www.tiaa.org/schedulenow.

IC offers an MA program located in one of the world's leading centers of international interaction.

Consistently ranked as one of the best cities for job seekers, Washington, DC, offers students unique internships, mentoring, and networking opportunities with a wide-range of individuals and organizations. This unparalleled access allows students to put their skillsets to use long after their time at SIS concludes.

Education- Global and Environmental

Fiscal Year 2018-2019 Biweekly Pay Schedule Covers April 2018 - May 2019

 

Fiscal Year 2018-2019 Biweekly Pay Schedule
Pay Period Hiring Paperwork
Deadline
Employee Information
Changes Deadline
Time Entry
Due Date
Pay Day
Mar 24 - Apr 06 Apr 02 Apr 04 Apr 09 Apr 20
Apr 07 - Apr 20 Apr 16 Apr 18 Apr 23 May 04
Apr 21 - May 04 Apr 30 May 02 May 02* May 18
May 05 - May 18 May 14 May 16 May 18* Jun 01
May 19 - Jun 01 May 25* May 30 Jun 04 Jun 15
Jun 02 - Jun 15 Jun 11 Jun 13 Jun 18 Jun 29
Jun 16 - Jun 29 Jun 25 Jun 27 Jul 02 Jul 13
Jun 30 - Jul 13 Jul 09 Jul 11 Jul 16 Jul 27
Jul 14 - Jul 27 Jul 23 Jul 25 Jul 30 Aug 10
Jul 28 - Aug 10 Aug 06 Aug 08 Aug 13 Aug 24
Aug 11 - Aug 24 Aug 20 Aug 22 Aug 27 Sep 07
Aug 25 - Sep 07 Aug 31* Sep 05 Sep 10 Sep 21
Sep 08 - Sep 21 Sep 17 Sep 19 Sep 24 Oct 05
Sep 22 - Oct 05 Oct 01 Oct 03 Oct 08 Oct 19
Oct 06 - Oct 19 Oct 15 Oct 17 Oct 22 Nov 02
Oct 20 - Nov 02 Oct 29 Oct 31 Nov 05 Nov 16
Nov 03 - Nov 16 Nov 12 Nov 14 Nov 19 Nov 30
Nov 17 - Nov 30 Nov 26 Nov 28 Dec 03 Dec 14
Dec 01 - Dec 14 Dec 10 Dec 12 Dec 17 Dec 28
Dec 15 - Dec 28 Dec 20* Dec 20* Jan 02† Jan 11
Dec 29 - Jan 11 Jan 07 Jan 09 Jan 14 Jan 25
Jan 12 - Jan 25 Jan 18* Jan 23 Jan 28 Feb 08
Jan 26 - Feb 08 Feb 04 Feb 06 Feb 11 Feb 22
Feb 09 - Feb 22 Feb 18 Feb 20 Feb 25 Mar 08
Feb 23 - Mar 08 Mar 04 Mar 06 Mar 11 Mar 22
Mar 09 - Mar 22 Mar 18 Mar 20 Mar 25 Apr 05
Mar 23 - Apr 05 Apr 01 Apr 03 Apr 08 Apr 19
Apr 06 - Apr 19 Apr 15 Apr 17 Apr 22 May 03
Apr 20 - May 03 Apr 29 May 01 May 06 May 17
May 04 - May 17 May 13 May 15 May 20 May 31
May 18 - May 31 May 24* May 29 Jun 03 Jun 14
*Denotes earlier date than usual
†Denotes later date than usual
Printable PDF available here.

 

All schedules are subject to change.

For More Information

2018 FSA Administrator

PayFlex

Customer Service: (800) 284-4885, 24 hours/day, 7 days/week
payflex.com
Fax claims toll-free: (888) 238-3539

New payflex.com Registrations:
Member ID = Your Social Security Number

2019 FSA Administrator

ConnectYourCare

Customer Service: (877) 292-4040
www.connectyourcare.com

Exhibition Overview

The stone carving artworks in China’s Shandong province play an important role in preserving the country’s ancient culture. For two weeks, the AU Museum will display a collection of rubbings that exhibit the fine calligraphy, folk inscriptions, and imagery of these carvings.   

This special exhibition contains more than 60 kinds of stone inscriptions of the Qin and Han Dynasties in the Shandong province of eastern China.  During the 7th century, the Chinese began to use a method of stone rubbing with paper and ink in order to make multiple copies of these inscriptions. The rubbings (also known as inked squeezes) preserved the inscriptions better than the stone itself. 

Organized in coordination with the Shandong Provincial Cultural Heritage Bureau and the Shandong Stone Carving Arts Museum. Supported by the Ren Foundation.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

For detailed instructions on entering personalized questions or changing the default dates the survey is available, please read the SET Instructions.

Timing and Response Rates

  • Evaluation settings are managed in Blue through Subject View Management (SVM) tasks. SVM allows instructors to change the date the survey is available to students, as well as view response rates.
  • The duration of the section (in calendar days) determines the default start and end dates for the survey. Standard evaluations are available for approximately one week.
  • By default, most surveys will close on the last section meeting date prior to final exam week.
  • Surveys must close prior to final grades being submitted.

Adding Questions

  • Instructors can add personalized questions BEFORE the survey goes live to students using Question Personalization (QP) tasks.
  • You cannot add additional questions after the survey goes live.
  • See the Bank of Items for a list of statements that can be added during Question Personalization.

Administering Surveys

  • We strongly recommend instructors allow students to respond to the SET during class time. Instructors who used class time had the highest response rates in the pilot.
  • Instructors should inform students in advance that time will be allotted during class, and students should be encouraged to bring laptops, tablets, or other Internet-enabled devices.
  • Instructors must leave the room while students are responding to the surveys.

Exhibition Overview

In the early to mid 1980s masterful Washington realist John Winslow engineered a series of stunning changes in his work: Precisely defined spaces became ambiguous, right angles became swooping curves, and once-static figures left gravity behind to dance gracefully and crazily through the air. By radically recasting his art, Winslow set the stage for the surprising, vibrant and equally masterful body of work that is the focus of this exhibition.

A catalog accompanying this exhibition is for sale in the Museum Shop.

Related Programming

June 18, 5:30-6:30 pm: Gallery Talk with the Artist in the Museum

In the Media Archive

There will be a two-week blackout period to access your 2018 FSA balances during January 1 - January 15, 2019 while we change FSA administrators. If you made 2019 FSA elections, you can use your new ConnectYourCare payment card during this period, but it will be accessing 2019 funds. You will have access to 2018 funds through ConnectYourCare after January 15, 2019.

Exhibition Overview

Michael Graham and Marc Pekala both trained in graphic design programs and went on to careers in teaching and commercial design. Their design educations provided a foundation and language for their visual exploration. Pekala grew up in Baltimore seeing the poster art of the pop music culture and developed a love for using typographic forms to solve visual problems while studying at AU. Graham studied in Rome and became enamored with Classical art and inscriptional letter forms.

Exhibition Overview

The MFA Curatorial Practice students from American University and Vilnius Academy of Arts (VAA) in Lithuania present a unique project as a part of educational and artistic exchange between the two universities: Lost and Found: Young Art from Lithuania. The Curatorial Practice students from both universities are developing their skills in the management of art as well as promotion of the artistic ambitions of their fellow students through this international exchange of exhibitions. Under the supervision of their professors, these students practice all practical stages of the curatorial process starting with the inception of artistic ideas to their presentation in the form of an exhibition to the international public.

Lost and Found is the result of a search for promising young artists from the Vilnius Academy of the Arts and the notion of a so-called “Lost-And-Found” office, the first of which was founded in Paris in 1805 to collect items lost in the city streets. In this exhibition, the curators searched for VAA artists discovering their identity. The show presents a wide range of media varying from traditional craftsmanship to unique technological solutions.

When you enroll in American University’s Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program, you are taking a step toward helping to build a better society. We offer students access to cutting-edge research, innovative partnerships with educational organizations in Washington, DC, and an engaging, progressive curriculum—all to leave you equipped and eager to inspire the next generation of students to solve society’s biggest problems.

Our university’s strong political and social legacy means we’re well positioned to attract world-changing passion, encourage it, and help you channel it back into the world where it can make a difference. Our top-notch faculty consists of respected specialists and researchers who offer their graduate students innovative, evidence-based teaching techniques.

American University’s MAT program is CAEP-recognized and designed for individuals who have a bachelor’s degree and are interested in obtaining a teaching license in either elementary or secondary education (English and social studies).

Assistant Director of ELTA Mindy Corriher

Mindy CorriherAssistant Director, Elta

Mindy Corriher serves as the Assistant Director of the English Language and Training Academy. In this role, she manages the admissions and onboarding processes and advises students in all ELTA programs. Mindy holds an MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from American University’s College of Arts and Sciences.

corriher@american.edu
(202) 895-4970

Located in Washington, DC, the epicenter of global affairs, GGPS brings the nation’s capital into the classroom. The combination of a large, active faculty and alumni committed to supporting current students gives you access to a wide-ranging network of individuals and organizations that will benefit you during your time at SIS and long after. Students will find extensive opportunities with international organizations, embassies, US government offices, think tanks, and other educational institutions around the city.

Shadi

Class of 2020 
Major:
SIS and CLEG
Hometown: Denver, CO 

Fun Fact:
I have tri-citizenship! Reach out to me to find out where!

Study Language and Culture on Your Terms

The Master of Arts in Spanish and Latin American Studies is a 33-credit, interdisciplinary program providing students with a strong foundation in the cultural, historical, linguistic, and political complexity of Latin America. In consultation with your advisor, you will design a personalized plan of study to pursue one of the three following tracks: interdisciplinary studies on Latin America, translation and linguistics, or Spanish language teaching. As a capstone project, you can choose to either write a qualifying paper or complete a comprehensive written exam.

Full-time students generally take two years to complete the program, but part-time options are also available. See complete Admissions & Course Requirements.

Faculty

Undergraduate Education


New release: Campaigns and Elections American Style

by James A. Thurber and Candice J. Nelson, 2009

With new and revised essays throughout, Campaigns and Elections American Style provides a real education in practical campaign politics. Academics and campaign professionals describe the innovation and reality of election campaigns as they have evolved over time to culminate in the phenomena of the new town meetings, bus tours, talk radio, infomercials, focus groups, and the Internet. The third edition explains how campaign themes and strategies are set and communicated; how advanced campaign tactics are used; why mobilizing volunteers is essential; why early campaign money is worth more; how to get the media to cover a campaign without paying for it; and how to use focus groups, survey research, and media to win elections. Offering a unique and careful mix of Democrat and Republican, academic and practitioner, and male and female campaign perspectives, this volume scrutinizes national- and local-level campaigns through the 2000 and 2008 election cycles. Students, citizens, candidates, and campaign managers will learn not only how to win elections but also why it has become imperative to do so in an ethical way. Perfect for a variety of courses in American government, this book is essential reading for political junkies of any stripe and serious students of campaigns and elections.

Westview Books
$35.00

Vital Signs: Perspectives on the Health of American Campaigning

David A. Dulio and Candice J. Nelson, 2005

The 2004 presidential contest mobilized a record number of voters, with 121 million Americans showing up at the polls. In many eyes, however, 2004 also plumbed new political depths. It was the most expensive presidential campaign in history, marked by polarizing partisanship and unprecedented negativity. In Vital Signs, David Dulio and Candice Nelson analyze the Bush and Kerry campaigns and use them as the springboard for a broader exploration of the current U.S. campaign system and all its strengths and weaknesses.

The authors address four key issues:

Who's in charge of modern campaigns?
How effective are the key players?
What role does money play?
Are campaigns being conducted in an ethical manner?

This provocative analysis is the culmination of a long-term multifaceted project on Improving Campaign Conduct, housed at American University. Vital Signs combines focus group research, personal interviews with campaign professionals, and an extensive set of data culled from original survey research to provide an important new tool in the discussion and assessment of American campaigns and elections.

Brookings Institution Press
$18.95
Order now



Congress and the Internet

James A. Thurber and Colton C. Campbell, eds., 2003

Top scholars in the field address the procedural and cultural effect of the Internet on the legislative process; how the use of the Internet impacts the conduct of communication and business on Capital Hill; the advantages and disadvantages of computer-based communication and interaction between lawmakers and their constituents; how the internet is used to shape Congress's political agenda; the result of Internet lobbying on Congress; how the Internet is used as a campaign tool; and how the Internet influences civic engagement with Congress.

Prentice Hall Publishers
$33.40

Out of print

Shades of Gray: Perspectives on Campaign Ethics

Candice J. Nelson, David A. Dulio, and Stephen K. Medvic, eds., 2002

To many, the term "campaign ethics" is an oxymoron. Questionable campaign conduct occurs at many levels, from national presidential elections to local delegate contests. Campaign ethics goes beyond mere "ethical dilemmas," or trying to decide whether or not a particular act is above board.

The chapters in this volume examine the broad questions of ethics in campaigns from the perspective of those actors that play critical roles in them, as well as the scholars who study them. The contributors-who include leading academics, as well as practitioners from the world of campaigning and campaign reform-outline, assess, and critique the role and responsibilities of candidates, citizens, organized interest groups, political parties, professional campaign consultants, and the media, in insuring ethical campaigns.

Brookings Institution
$18.95
Order now



Crowded Airwaves: Campaign Advertising in Elections

James A. Thurber, Candice J. Nelson, and David A. Dulio, Editors, 2001

This volume gathers some of the most important new work in American political advertising and communication. The contributors include several of the foremost experts in this increasingly visible field. They provide an objective and balanced analysis of political advertising: its causes, its growth, and its consequences on U.S. elections. The merits of negative advertising are debated by Richard R. Lau and Lee Sigelman, Kathleen Hall Jamieson and her colleagues, and Kim Fridkin Kahn and Patrick J. Kenney. Paul Herrnson and Kelly D. Patterson, and Shanto Iyengar and John Petrocik grapple with the role of campaign advertising in deciding electoral outcomes. Darrell West describes the ascendance of issue advertising in modern elections and offers ideas about how to deal with its continuing proliferation.

Crowded Airwaves will appeal to readers who are interested in political campaigns and communication. It will be of special importance to those concerned with the tone and content of electoral campaigns and political discourse: negative advertisements, interest-group issue advocacy, and their impact on voting decisions.

Brookings Institution
$19.95
Order now



Campaign Warriors: Political Consultants in Elections

James A. Thurber and Candice J. Nelson, eds., 2000

Campaign politics has become increasingly professionalized in recent years. The growing prevalence and influence of paid consultants in the United States and other democracies is one of the most important factors changing the nature of electoral politics. Campaign Warriors thoroughly examines this critical-and controversial-development and its impact on the political system in the U.S. and other countries.

The contributors approach the topic from several different perspectives, including the increasing use of "spin doctors" and the resulting loss of influence of state and national political parties. The book investigates the role of these paid advisers: who they are, what they do and why, and how they feel about their work. The contributors discuss the consultant's relationship with candidates and parties, and analyze the effect of their efforts on election outcomes.

James A. Thurber is professor of government and the founding director of the Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies at American University. He is also principal investigator on The Pew Charitable Trusts' "Improving Campaign Conduct" project, from which this volume emerges. Candice J. Nelson is associate professor of government and the academic director of the Campaign Management Institute at American University.

Brookings Institution
$19.95
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The Battle for Congress: Consultants, Candidates, and Voters

James A. Thurber, Editor, 2000

This volume provides an in-depth examination of six political campaigns waged during competitive 1998 races for the U.S. House of Representatives. The case studies evaluate the professional political consultants who managed each campaign, their interaction with the candidates, and the impact of the campaigns on voters. Relying on unparalleled access to both the consultants involved and the candidates themselves, the contributors explore the electoral setting and context of the congressional districts, the strategy, theme, and message of each campaign, the consultants' decisionmaking, fund-raising, and spending, and any outside forces that entered into the races. The book features new data on tracking, polls, and television advertising budgets.

Contributors include Carolyn Long (Washington State University), Burdett Loomis (Robert J. Dole Center, University of Kansas), Charles S. Bullock (University of Georgia), Diana Evans (Trinity College), David Canon (University of Wisconsin, Madison), and Jeff Gill (California Polytechnic University, San Louis Obispo).

James A. Thurber is professor of government and the founding director of the Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies at American University. He is the coeditor of Campaign Warriors: Political Consultants in Elections (Brookings, 2000) and Crowded Airwaves: Campaign Advertising in Elections (Brookings, 2000).

The Bookings Institution
$19.95
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Congressional Procedures and the Policy Process, 7th edition

Walter J. Oleszek, 2007

The definitive work on how congressional rules, procedures, and traditions affect the course and content of legislation, this seventh edition reflects both thorough updating and further refinement. In the House and the Senate, and from committee room to the floor, the fundamentals of lawmaking are made clear in Walter Oleszek's straight talking, informative book on Congress. With dozens of lively illustrations, charts, and extracts from real documents, Oleszek spotlights both "regular order" and unconventional procedures while explaining the role of congressional leadership, the use of strategic tactics, and complicated parliamentary processes. Readers will appreciate Oleszek's insight on the ever-sophisticated use of procedures-such as "filling the tree"-to achieve party and policy objectives in a time of sharper partisanship.

CQ Press
$49.95

Congress and Its Members, 12th Edition

Roger H. Davidson, Walter J. Oleszek, and Frances E. Lee 2009

Davidson, Oleszek, and Lee's focus on Congress as both a legislative institution and as a group of reelection-minded politicians has proven to be an extraordinarily effective and accessible way for thousands of students to understand the institution and the law-making process. A proven classic, the twelfth edition of Congress and Its Members features careful revising, new scholarship, and crucial updating.

CQ Press
$59.95

New release: Rivals for Power Fourth Edition

Edited by James A. Thurber, 2009

Rivals for Power is a lively and up to date description of the power struggle between the president and Congress. In it, leading congressional and presidential scholars and knowledgeable former public officials consider the historical, political, and constitutional foundations of conflict between the two branches. The authors give practical advice about how to build cooperative policymaking between the president and Congress as they struggle over major crises in solving economic problems and addressing domestic issues and the challenges in defense and foreign policy making. The book features original academic research and practitioner knowledge from the White House and the Hill.

This fourth edition includes all new essays with unique and critical viewpoints on the role of the president and Congress in the policy making process. Many of the essays focus on lessons learned about cooperation and conflict between the two branches from the Clinton and Bush presidencies. The essays include preliminary analyses of President Barack Obama's relationship with Congress. Because the authors have made major contributions as congressional and presidential scholars, and have played key roles in Congress, in the White House, in the media, and as lobbyists, each chapter presents a different perspective. This new edition of Rivals for Power is intended for students, scholars, public officials, the media, and the general public.

Rowman & Littlefield
$34.95

Marcia Howard: Dance Faculty

Teaching African Dance at American University brings me joy! It is amazing to observe students, who have had no prior connection with African culture, begin to open their lives to the powerful dance and music of the Malinke, Soussou, and Wolof people of West Africa.

Department Faculty


Exhibition Overview

This exhibition is a collaboration with the Hamiltonian Gallery along with Hamiltonian Artists, a non-profit career incubator for the next generation of contemporary visual artists. It features new work by the 2012 Hamiltonian Fellows: Amy Boone-McCreesh, Milana Braslavsky, Billy Friebele, Nora Howell, Annette Isham, Matthew Mann, Joshua Wade Smith, Timothy Thompson, and Jerry Truong. The theme of the exhibition is based on the Jorgen Leth / Lars Von Trier documentary, The Five Obstructions. The Fellows made obstructions for each other's work based on a summer 2012 studio visit and discussion. The obstructions operate as useful critiques of existing work as well as a challenge to future work. This playful yet meaningful exercise offered each artist the opportunity to step outside of self-imposed rules, habits, or routines. AU studio art professor and co-director of AU's MFA program Tim Doud served as the mentor for the group.

University College Courses

In UC, students enroll in a Complex Problems seminar chosen specifically for this Living-Learning Community. The seminar satisfies one of your first AU Core requirements, introducing you to university-level inquiry. Students in UC ask and answer tough questions in a friendly and encouraging academic environment.

 

In the Field

Fall events included talks with Bob Rosen and Karambu Ringera:

The Flexible Spending Account (FSA) benefits give employees the opportunity to pay for eligible health care and dependent care expenses with pre-tax dollars, lowering taxable income and increasing take-home pay.

Health Care Flexible Spending Account

  • Reimburses medical, dental and vision expenses that are not covered or fully reimbursed by the benefit plans. Examples of eligible expenses include: deductibles and copayments for medical, dental, vision or prescriptions.
  • 2019 Maximum contribution amount per calendar year is $2,650*.

Dependent Flexible Spending Account

  • Reimburses eligible dependent care including care provided inside or outside your home, day care provided by a licensed facility or day camp.
  • 2019 Maximum contribution amount per calendar year $5,000.
  • May only be utilized for children up to age 13.

Both FSA benefits are use it or lose it plans. You may not recover money left in either of the accounts after the end of the plan year and grace period.

As of October 30, 2018 the IRS had not yet released 2019 benefit limits.

We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, by Jeff Chang, author of Who We Be and Can't Stop Won't Stop

Featuring:
We Gon’ be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation
By Jeff Chang

Where/When:
Bender Arena
Wed., Sept. 6, 8:00 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Literature and the Writing Studies Program, we welcome you to American University. To set the stage for your first year here at AU, we have chosen a book that we call our “community text” for you to read before you arrive in August. You and your classmates will discuss the book and write about it in your College Writing class. The Writing Studies Program and the Campus Store will also sponsor an essay contest to honor the best writing inspired by the community text.

The dialogue we develop around the challenging themes that define our community texts unifies our students and faculty in an intellectual experience. When we ask tough questions, explore controversy, listen to one another respectfully, and sharpen our claims, we illustrate how writing is a social act at the heart of an academic community. Welcoming our text’s author to campus to discuss their work is an essential part of that shared intellectual experience.

We’re delighted to announce this year’s choice: Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Jeff Chang has written extensively on culture, politics, the arts, and music and has been awarded numerous honors, including the American Book Award and the Asian American Literary Award. He is currently the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in Arts at Stanford University. We will bring Mr. Chang to campus this fall for the twentieth annual Writer as Witness Colloquium on Wednesday, September 6, at 8:00 p.m. in Bender Arena. He will address the American University community and meet with students and faculty to discuss the book, as well as the craft, artistry, and research that went into its creation.

Writing about We Gon’ Be Alright, Georgetown professor of sociology Michael Eric Dyson (author of the recent Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America) says, “In the midst of our tense racial debates, this book is required reading.” In these provocative and powerful essays, Chang examines the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. He looks at the barriers in the way of progress towards cultural equality and racial justice, exploring issues of resegregation and the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity” in the US through topics like #BlackLivesMatter, Ferguson, student protest, and Beyoncé’s Lemonade. Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post says that We Gon’ Be Alright provides “an unforgettable discussion of the Asian American experience,” and Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.”

Center members at computer with neurons on the screen

AU's Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, established in 2012, provides a unique interdisciplinary research and training environment that promotes excellence in the study of brain function and its manifestation in behavior.

The Center strives to support neuroscience research efforts and promote collaborative interactions among neuroscientists as well as scientists from other disciplines. The Center also provides core research facilities for neuroscience research faculty and scientists from other disciplines.

Related Degrees and Programs

KT Aylesworth: Class of 2020

I chose to become a Dance major because dance has always been such a huge part of my life. I can't imagine not dancing for a semester, and I enjoy delving deeper into familiar styles and also learning brand new ones. There is something for everyone, no matter what your level, and the staff, faculty, and students are always so welcoming to anyone who joins the program. As a Musical Theatre major, dance is already a big part of what I do, so adding on the Dance minor allows me to increase the amount of dance I get to learn about!

Pricing

All of our paper is HP Glossy Photo Paper, and the prices are charged by the length of the final poster. The price per linear foot varies by the width of the paper roll (length/12 x cost of roll). Current roll costs are:

  • 24 inch wide roll - $4.50 per foot
  • 36 inch wide roll - $4.75 per foot
  • 42 inch wide roll - $5.00 per foot

Payment is taken in EagleBucks only. Money can be added to your AUID on the EagleBucks Portal.

2012

The Rippling Effects of Deportations on Children in Mexican Immigrant Families

December 5, 2012

As part of the Center on Health, Risk, and Society's Seminar Series and in conjunction with the CLALS initiative on Deportation and the Health of U.S. Latino Communities, Joanna Dreby, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University at Albany-SUNY, offered a talk entitled, "The Rippling Effects of Deportations on Children in Mexican Immigrant Families."

Hemisphere in Flux Workshop-Sao Paulo, Brazil

November 12-14, 2012

After a successful workshop in Washington, D.C. last October, participants in the Hemisphere in Flux project convened again in Sao Paulo to present their work on various aspects of hemispheric relations. Presentations addressed trends in inter-American affairs and in foreign policies of major states in the hemisphere. A public Round Table was held on November 12.

Workshop on Religion and Violence-Phoenix, AZ

November 10, 2012

As part of the 2012 annual conference of the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion (SSSR) hosted in Phoenix, AZ, CLALS sponsored a workshop on Religion and Violence in Latin America. The panel highlighted select pieces of cutting-edge research carried out by participants in the CLALS project on Religious Responses to Violence in Latin America.

Reconfiguration of Elites and Power in Central America

November 1-3, 2012

The Reconfiguration of Elites and Power in Central America project held its second substantive workshop in Costa Rica. Participants discussed papers which have been commissioned on how specific phenomena of change (e.g. war, state restructuring, the encounter with globalization) provoked discontinuities in both the composition of elites and their relations to the broader social, political and economic orders. A series of studies of the configuration of today's economic elites in Central America were also presented, and subsequent phases of the project were mapped.

Ambulante: Mexico and Documentary Film

November 1, 2012

With support from the Mexican Cultural Institute, CLALS and the AU Center for Social Media co-sponsored an event highlighting Ambulante on November 1st from 6-10pm at the Abramson Family Recital Hall in the Katzen Arts Center. Founded in 2005 by Gael García Bernal, Diego Luna, and Pablo Cruz, Ambulante brings cutting-edge documentary film to audiences around the globle. The public event traced the evolution of Ambulante and the Mexican film festival through screenings of two short films, Nicolás Pereda's "Entrevista con la Tierra" and Ambulante Beyond's "Campo 9." Film screenings were followed by a panel discussion led by Ambulante Co-Founder Pablo Cruz, Executive Director Elena Fortes, Director Carolina Coppel, and SOC Professor Patricia Aufderheide.

Latino Entrepreneurs in the DC Metro Area

October 11-13, 2012

Preliminary findings of the CLALS project Latino Entrepreneurs in the DC Metro Area, which is undertaken in collaboration with the Latino Economic Development Center (LEDC), was presented and discussed in a panel entitled "Latino Immigrant Entrepreneurs: Future Time Perspectives" at the Third Annual International Council for Small Business (ICSB-GWU) Conference.

Toward a Poetics of Wonder: A Lecture by Acclaimed Mexican Author Alberto Ruy Sánchez

September 20, 2012

As part of an agreement between AU and the Mexican National Council for Culture and the Arts (CONACULTA), CLALS welcomed prominent Mexican author Alberto Ruy Sánchez who delivered a lecture on the literary journey that led to El Quinteto de Mogador, a five-novel series born out of the author's travels between Mexico and Morocco.

Documentary Film and Social Change in Cuba

September 19, 2012

CLALS hosted two Cuban documentary filmmakers from the Instituto Superior de Arte, María Elisa Pérez and Duniesky Cantón Fernández, to share their compelling documentary on housing conditions in Havana. Their week-long stay included class visits and film screenings at American University, Norfolk State University, the University of Maryland, College Park and the College of William and Mary. For more information, click here. To watch the two-part documentary, click here.

Community Disruption and HIV/AIDS in DC

September 13-14, 2012

The AU Center on Health, Risk, and Society (CHRS) hosted a conference focusing on three specific processes of community disruption particularly relevant to health in D.C.: incarceration and re-entry; neighborhood change and gentrification; and immigration and deportation. The conference was co-sponsored by CLALS and the District of Columbia Developmental Center for AIDS Research (DC D-CFAR). A panel organized in conjunction with the CLALS research initiative on Deportation and Health was held on Thursday, September 13.

Violence in Mexico: A Nonviolent Response

September 12, 2012

In coordination with the Kay Spiritual Center and the School of International Service, CLALS brought John Feeley, Principle Deputy Assistant Secretary, Western Hemisphere Affairs, Department of State and Eric Olson, Associate Director, Mexico Institute, Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars to address the current state of violence in Mexico and mechanisms to combat it. The two speakers engaged an audience of 70 students, staff and faculty; the talk was followed by a question and answer session.

The Reconfiguration of Elites and Power in Ce