Community Adapation of Climate Change Parismina, Costa Rica

Over the course of our program, we will seek to understand how the community is adapting to climate change. We will do so using Community-Based Research methods, namely a survey, to gather and analyze data that we will present back to the community and use to further our advocacy methods upon return. Additionally, we will focus on sea turtle conservation efforts as many species, including the green, leatherback, olive ridley, and hawksbill, are greatly affected by climate change. We will also be staying in homestays to further strengthen our intercultural and language learning. We’re excited to pursue these themes and grow in our understanding of the roles we play in the global climate community.

Dates of Engagement: May 9th- 21st 2021

Estimated Cost: $2,500*

*Program cost includes all expenses, meals, accomodation, and travel costs. The figure listed above represents a conservative, high estimate. Full program cost per student will not exceed this amount. Final cost to student is subject to change based on available travel grants, the finalized itinerary, and program fundraising efforts.

Candace Roy is a sophomore in Public Health with a minor in International Studies. She hails from Rumson, NJ, a small town on the coast. On campus, she is also involved with the Peer Health Educators program as well as the Community Based Research Scholars. Outside of AU, she loves to read and knit (she claims that she's "basically a grandma!"). Candace is super excited to be leading this program and can’t wait to learn more about climate change and sea turtles. The social justice themes are important to her because she has experienced the effects of climate change firsthand, and believes that by understanding how others experience them we can create comprehensive solutions.

Candace Roy alt-break leader

John Boyle is excited to be your program leader to Costa Rica! He is both a proud Bostonian and sophomore in the School of International Service focusing thematically on environmental sustainability and global health as well as global inequality and development, with a regional focus in Latin America. He plans to minor in Environmental Science and Spanish, earning certificates in Spanish Translation and Community-Based Research along the way. As a member of the Peace Corps Prep Program, he hopes to one day serve his fellow Latino communities abroad, and as a lifelong learner, he cannot wait to discover what opportunities this program has in store.

John Boyle alt-break leader

Day One: Arrive in San Jose, have a traditional Costa Rican dinner with our host organization (Amigos) and stay the night in a hostel.

Day Two: Spend the morning with Amigos staff exploring leadership styles and Costa Rican history and culture. After lunch, travel to our primary location of Parismina where we will be working for the week. Become acquainted with your host families over dinner before engaging in a workshop about cross-cultural communication.

Day Three: In the morning, get introduced to our local partner organization (ASTOP) and engage in team-building activities with their staff. Break for lunch and a siesta at the hottest part of the day, and then spend the afternoon working on a community service project. After dinner, learn more about the local culture and then participate in a night turtle patrol.

Day Four: Spend the morning with ASTOP staff furthering community service and conservation work, break again at lunch, and then spend the afternoon working on surveying the community for our community-based research project. In the evening, have dinner with host families, take time for group reflection, and participate in another night turtle patrol.

Day Five: Spend the morning with ASTOP staff furthering community service and conservation work, break again at lunch, and spend the afternoon working on surveying the community for our community-based research project. In the evening, have dinner with host families, take time for group reflection, and participate in another night turtle patrol.

Day Six: Spend the morning with ASTOP staff furthering community service and conservation work, break again at lunch, and go on a local mini excursion in the afternoon. Spend the evening with ASTOP staff in a closing ceremony.

Day Seven: Travel back to San Jose, stopping for lunch along the way. Have dinner with Amigos staff and learn about ways we can stay engaged with the local community. Spend the evening participating in a closing ceremony hosted by Amigos and stay the night in a hostel.

Day Eight: Travel back to DC. Reflect on the experiences we had throughout our time in Costa Rica and what we learned from the community’s adaptation to climate change.