You are here: American University Provost Office of Graduate & Professional Studies Graduate Studies Dissertation and Thesis Presentations

Dissertation and Thesis Presentations

Candidates who are in the process of defending their doctoral dissertation or master's thesis may submit their information to the Office of Graduate Studies for posting to this page. Submissions intended for this page should be sent at least two weeks before the date of the defense.

Dissertation Presentations
 

Student Name: Emine Elcin Koten
Graduate Level: Ph.D.
Field of Study: Economics
Committee Chair: Professor Kara Reynolds
Committee Members: Professor Robert Feinberg, Dr. Michael J. Ferrantino (World Bank), Dr. Kati Suominen (External Reader, CSIS)
Date of Presentation: 7/28/2021
Time of Presentation: 8:30 am

Title of Dissertation: Three Essays on Internet Platform Usage and Trade

Abstract: In the last decade the key driver of e-commerce growth has been the expansion of internet access. Studies indicate that the internet is transforming both the production and the consumption of goods and services in the domestic and international markets. Internet platform usage has significantly decreased the barriers for firms to communicate with foreign clients and suppliers on their international market participation. Using the internet platform for marketing intelligence enables firms to access information about the external environment at a faster rate and lower cost. The internet has the potential to reduce market-specific fixed entry costs because suppliers can more easily find information about new markets and can also advertise to numerous buyers at once. However, only few studies have studied the linkage between firm’s internet platform usage and its foreign market participation. Thus, this dissertation adds to the limited literature by examining how using the internet platform can affect firm’s participation in global markets. 
 

_________________________________________________________
 

Student Name: Naomi Stahl
Graduate Level: Ph.D.
Field of Study: Clinical Psychology
Committee Chair: Laura Juliano, Ph.D.
Committee Members: David Haaga, Ph.D., Erica Hart, Ph.D., Melanie 
Bennett, Ph.D., Jessica Lohnberg, Ph.D. (external reader)
Date of Presentation: 7/19/21
Time of Presentation: 1-4pm

Title: Evaluation of Treatment Components of a Smoking Cessation 
Program for Veterans with Serious Mental Illness

Abstract:
High cigarette smoking rates pose a serious health threat for individuals with serious mental illness (SMI). Despite being as motivated to quit smoking as the general population, quit rates are lower and less research is focused on identifying effective smoking cessation interventions for individuals with SMI. This secondary data analysis examined effectiveness of treatment components within a multifaceted smoking cessation intervention developed for Veterans with SMI (Bennett et al., 2015). The intervention offered five treatment components: (1) group sessions, (2) smoking cessation pharmacotherapy, (3) outreach contacts, (4) medication education sessions, (5) MI sessions. Participants could self-select use and dose of each treatment component. Attending a greater number of group sessions was significantly associated with lower nicotine dependence, greater abstinence self-efficacy, fewer cigarettes smoked per day, and greater likelihood of reporting a reduction in smoking post-intervention. Using a greater number of NRT/medications was significantly associated with lower nicotine dependence, fewer cigarettes smoked per day, greater confidence in quitting smoking, greater likelihood of reporting no smoking in the past week or month, and greater likelihood of reporting plans to quit smoking in the next month. Engaging in a greater number of medication education sessions was significantly associated with fewer cigarettes smoked per day and greater likelihood to report a reduction in smoking post-intervention. Using a greater number of outreach contacts and MI sessions were not associated with any outcomes on smoking measures. Using a greater number of treatment components was associated with significantly lower nicotine dependence, fewer cigarettes smoked per day, and greater intentions to quit smoking in the next month, as compared to using fewer treatment components. Lastly, using a greater number of treatment encounters was associated with significantly lower nicotine dependence, fewer cigarettes smoked per day, and greater smoking reduction, as compared to using fewer treatment encounters. Smokers with SMI can engage in a multicomponent smoking cessation intervention and reduce their smoking. Future studies should explore creative ways to incorporate shared decision-making into smoking cessation intervention development for individuals with SMI.