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AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST-220 Topics in American Pop Culture Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in American Popular Culture (3) Topics vary by section. An interdisciplinary study through cinema, literature, music, TV, and folklore of American popular culture. Topics consider how race, ethnicity, class, gender, age, and nationalism, among other variables, can shape the content and popular reception of mass culture. Usually Offered: spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

AMST-220-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Latinx Studies
Latinx Studies (3) This course is an introduction to the academic field of Latinx studies. Students analyze Latinx identities in relation to history, immigration, culture, space, race, community, power, sexuality, gender, language, nation, and rights, to gain understanding of the field as a political enterprise. They also analyze the histories of predominant Latinx sub-groups (Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Dominicans, among others) and further incorporate global perspectives by exploring the role of Central America, South America, and the Caribbean in the shaping of Latinidad. Readings include academic texts, fiction, documentaries, and primary sources and the course features guest speakers and field trips.
AMST-220-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Fashion, Race and Gender
Fashion, Race and Gender (3) This course critically examines the ways in which fashion impacts and reflects power structures in Western society, particularly regarding race and gender. Students consider 18th through 20th century U.S. history by looking at the intersections of fashion, race, and gender to examine historical agency, social conformity, resistance, and cultural change. Topics include consumerism and the rise of the department store, identity formation, gendered and racial gaze, and the body as a site of struggle. Meets with HIST-296 004.
AMST-220-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Superheroes & American Society
Superheroes and American Society (3) Superhero comics emerged in the 1930s from pulp fiction to reflect on Americans' desire for security, order, and control. During the following decades, comic superheroes conquered movie and TV screens, but continued to project the desires of generations, as well as the ideologies prevalent in American society. This course discusses how the superhero genre has examined foreign policy, war, gender, race, and change in the past and present.