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ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-640 Current Issues in Anthropology Course Level: Graduate

Current Issues in Anthropology (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics include issues such as social inequality, urban nature, militarism and state violence, reading/resisting neoliberalism, and Southwest archaeology. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Restriction: graduate anthropology program.

ANTH-640-001
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Capitalism & Urban Transformtn
Capitalism and Urban Transformation (3) This course looks historically and currently at the connections between capitalism and urban transformations, starting with classic political economic understandings of urban transformation and capital in the city (e.g., Fredric Engels, Henri Lefebvre, David Harvey) and moving onto more contemporary analyses of urban space and place, gentrification, and current urban crises (e.g., Ruth Gilmore, Setha Low, Neil Smith) in order to understand urban space and its transformation as intimately shaped and produced by processes of capital accumulation, crises, dispossession, and resistance. Throughout the course students read ethnographies of urban transformation, both nationally and internationally, to examine how global processes of speculation, displacement, and gentrification transform cities and shape the terrain of struggle for urban residents. There is particular emphasis on reading ethnographies of contestation, protest, and resistance against and amidst urban change.
ANTH-640-901
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Capitalism & Urban Transformtn
Capitalism and Urban Transformation (3) This course looks historically and currently at the connections between capitalism and urban transformations, starting with classic political economic understandings of urban transformation and capital in the city (e.g., Fredric Engels, Henri Lefebvre, David Harvey) and moving onto more contemporary analyses of urban space and place, gentrification, and current urban crises (e.g., Ruth Gilmore, Setha Low, Neil Smith) in order to understand urban space and its transformation as intimately shaped and produced by processes of capital accumulation, crises, dispossession, and resistance. Throughout the course students read ethnographies of urban transformation, both nationally and internationally, to examine how global processes of speculation, displacement, and gentrification transform cities and shape the terrain of struggle for urban residents. There is particular emphasis on reading ethnographies of contestation, protest, and resistance against and amidst urban change. Open only to Anthropology Master's International Program students. Meets with ANTH-640 001.