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ASIAN STUDIES

ASIA-296 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

ASIA-296-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Korean Culture through Film
Korean Culture through Film (3) The turbulent modern history of South Korea has formed a society that has involved a variety of social forces, both domestic and international, in complicated and contradictory ways. The rapid and sweeping social changes in the society has forced it to engage with a struggle to re-examine, re-define and revolve itself and its relation to such basic ideas as nation, tradition, class, and gender. Contemporary Korean films, which have also evolved along with the society, provide an especially interesting introduction to these issues and how Koreans have thought of and adapted to them. This course focuses on the issues that intersect national identity, modernization, class, and gender in contemporary Korean society and culture through the lens of current Korean films. The course is organized around the screening of a feature film, preceded by an introduction to place it in its cultural context and followed by a discussion. Students are exposed to a selection of films (with English subtitles) that deal with various issues pertaining to national identity, class, and gender. The readings for the course are drawn from diverse fields including anthropology, history, literature, women's studies, and film studies.
ASIA-296-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Asian American Experiences
Asian American Experiences (3) This course introduces the interdisciplinary studies and conceptual ideas in Asian American studies. Students survey the various dimensions of Asian American experiences including social images, status and positionality, languages, immigration law, history, literature, and arts. Students gain an understanding of the current multicultural society experiencing unique features of Asian Americans' life and cultures. Meets with AMST-296 001.
ASIA-296-003
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Communism/Capitalism in E.Asia
Communism and Capitalism in East Asia (3) This course focuses on the theories of communism and capitalism, as well as their respective practices in East Asia and implications for socioeconomic and political development in the region. More specifically, the course examines the political and economic systems, processes, and changes in East Asia including China and Taiwan, North and South Korea, Japan, and Singapore. Major contemporary issues and policies of the East Asian systems are also surveyed, with particular emphasis on how the East Asian societies' socioeconomic and political performance, as well as their cultural traditions, affects these regimes' claim to political legitimacy. Meets with GOVT-233 001.
ASIA-296-001
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: North Korean Defectors
Instructional Method: Online. North Korean Defectors: Their Lives, Realities, and Politics (3) This course provides a broad overview of the multifaceted lives of North Korean defectors through their own narratives and insights from experts drawn from interviews, documentaries, and news articles. The course explores the numerous challenges and opportunities that the North Korean defectors face on the Korean peninsula and abroad, touching on a variety of topics such as the North Korean caste system (songbun), political imprisonment and human rights violations, refugee resettlements, and adjusting to life in a new society.
ASIA-296-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Modern East Asia
Modern East Asia (3) The course examines modern East Asia during the critical period from mid-nineteenth century to the present, as Western powers arrived on a wholesale scale and the conflicts between tradition and modernity created major changes in East Asian societies. Students learn about major historical events, the ideas behind the changes, and the problems that East Asian political leaders, intellectuals, and people faced in the process of their society's shift from traditional to modern.
ASIA-296-002
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Intro to Asian Philosophy
Introduction to Asian Philosophy (3) A thematic introduction to the Eastern philosophical tradition. Students read major classic and contemporary texts in Eastern philosophy on being, world, society, and ethics, and examine Eastern philosophers' views on the nature of self, personhood, politics, family, and gender; logics, religion, and cosmology. Meets with PHIL-211 001.
ASIA-296-003
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: History of Modern China
History of Modern China (3) A survey of the major events, themes, and issues in modern Chinese history, from the Qing empire to the twentieth century. Meets with HIST-251 001.