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ARAB WORLD STUDIES

AWST-396 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

AWST-396-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Ethnic Divers/State Mkng MENA
Ethnic Diversity and State Making in MENA (3) This course is a sociological introduction to state making and nation-building efforts in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) since the collapse of the Ottoman Empire. The course is also designed as a survey of ethnic minorities in the MENA region with a special emphasis on Kurds and Berbers. Major themes include theories of state formation, nationalism and nation-state engineering, the rise and fall of Arab nationalism, ethnic minorities and human rights, ethno-political social movements, theories of ethnic mobilization, civil wars, and political violence and terrorism.
AWST-396-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Orientalism Revisited
Orientalism Revisited (3) Orientalism is both the institutional legacy of Western study and representation of the Orient and the title of Edward Said's ground-breaking critique, Orientalism. This course examines the legacy of Western study of the Arab and Islamic Middle East, the critical evaluation of this history, and the ensuing controversies that erupted. Students engage deeply with the complexities of Orientalism as both a discourse of knowledge and a system of repression.
AWST-396-003
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Orientalism Revisited
Orientalism Revisited (3) Orientalism is both the institutional legacy of Western study and representation of the Orient and the title of Edward Said's ground-breaking critique, Orientalism. This course examines the legacy of Western study of the Arab and Islamic Middle East, the critical evaluation of this history, and the ensuing controversies that erupted. Students engage deeply with the complexities of Orientalism as both a discourse of knowledge and a system of repression.
AWST-396-004
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: People's Hist of Middle East
People's History of the Middle East (3) This course provides students with a comparative and critical understanding of the modern history of the Middle East by focusing on minority and subaltern groups in the region: nomads, peasants, workers, women, refugees, and stateless people. Shifting scholarly focus beyond "grand" or "master" narratives to the study of "history from below", this course is an exercise in writing "a people's history" of the modern Middle East. In additions to primary readings, students discuss the major sources, methods, theories and academic debates in the field of Middle East Studies.
AWST-396-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Women & Islam in Middle East
Women and Islam in the Middle East (3) Middle Eastern women are routinely portrayed in the media as oppressed, and Islam is frequently cited as the source of such oppression. How accurate is this depiction of women in the region? What constitutes oppression if women in Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Lebanon, and Egypt had the right to vote before female citizens of Switzerland? This course explores key issues pertaining to women and Islam in the Middle East. Students are exposed to the ways in which religion, culture, history and social contexts have all contributed to current views and practices in the Middle East. Meets with WGSS-350 002.
AWST-396-002
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Arabs in Israel
Arabs in Israel (3) This course introduces students to the Israeli-Arab community in Israel through analysis of its economic, educational, historical, and political structure and experience. The course begins with an overview of their cultural heritage, ethnic, religious, national identity, and traditional customs then examines some of these subjects more deeply, such as Israeli-Arab cultural and religious practices, family conflict resolution practices and mediation, marital structure (including polygamy), child-rearing practices, women's education and power, family honor, social-economic status, and the traditional justice system. Finally, it addresses how today's Israeli-Arab community interacts with Israeli law, with the Israel-Jewish community including local and national elections, urbanization processes and, of course, the important issue of land claims and the impact of the larger Israeli-Arab political conflict on this community. Case examples are an integral part of the course. Meets with ANTH-350 002 ISR-396-001
AWST-396-003
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Islamophobia
Islamophobia in Discourse and the Media (1) This course examines representations of Arabs and Muslims in the West and explores how Islamophobia is constructed in language and discourse. Students critically engage with the depictions of Islam and the Arab world (and where and how the two are conflated or intertwined) that circulate in contemporary American media and popular culture.