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GOVT-020 Campaign Management Institute Course Level: 500-LEVEL Course

Campaign Management Institute (0) Noncredit option for the Campaign Management Institute, a two-week intensive course on major aspects of political campaigning. Student teams present a simulated campaign plan to a professional panel. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: introductory course in government.

GOVT-023 The Art and Craft of Lobbying Course Level: 500-LEVEL Course

The Art and Craft of Lobbying (0) Noncredit option for two-week intensive institute in major aspects of professional lobbying and influencing the policymaking process. Student teams directed by mentors drawn from the lobbying profession present a simulated lobbying plan to a professional panel. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: introductory course in government.

GOVT-096 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: 500-LEVEL Course

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (0) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

GOVT-099 Maintain Matriculation Course Level: Graduate

GOVT-102 Natl Studnt Ldrshp Conf Topics Course Level: Undergraduate

National Student Leadership Conference Topics (1) Topics vary by section. Topics include political action and public policy. Usually Offered: summer. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Restriction: National Student Leadership Conference (NSLC).

GOVT-105 Indiv Freedom vs Auth Course Level: Undergraduate

Individual Freedom vs. Authority FA2 (3) The study of major philosophical discussions of the conflict between individual freedom and authority with analysis of the relation between this conflict and the problem of organizing a government. Usually Offered: fall and spring.

GOVT-110 Politics in the U.S. Course Level: Undergraduate

Politics in the United States FA4 (3-4) Study of major philosophical concepts that shaped government in the United States combined with an analysis of contemporary political institutions and behavior, focusing on the American governmental system. Four-credit sections include Washington laboratory experiences. Usually Offered: fall, spring, and summer.

GOVT-130 Comparative Politics Course Level: Undergraduate

Comparative Politics FA3 (3) How different societies, both Western and non-Western, have approached the political problems of order and responsiveness. The relationships, in a cross-cultural perspective, between the individual and the state; social and economic processes; culture and behavior. Usually Offered: fall, spring, and summer.

GOVT-194 Comm Service Learning Project Course Level: Undergraduate

Community Service-Learning Project (1) Grading: Pass/Fail only. Permission: instructor and Center for Community Engagement & Service.

GOVT-205 Political Theory: Issues/Texts Course Level: Undergraduate

Political Theory: Issues and Texts (1) In this course students explore contemporary debates in political theory by meeting with visiting scholars and public intellectuals from across the country. They participate in discussion groups and read supplemental texts related to lectures sponsored by the Political Theory Institute (PTI) and have private meetings with its speakers. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit. Grading: A-F only. Prerequisite: GOVT-105. Permission: instructor.

GOVT-210 Pol Power & Am Pub Policy Course Level: Undergraduate

Political Power and American Public Policy FA4 (3) This course offers an introduction to American public policy and written communication in political science. Students explore key questions about political power and public policy, learn the writing conventions of political science, and refine their written communication and information literacy skills. Through examination of the American public policymaking system and prominent issues in American public policy, as well as instruction on problem definition, issue analysis, and policy proposal, students come to understand how policy is made and how to participate effectively in the process. AU Core Integrative Requirement: Written Communication and Information Literacy II. Usually Offered: fall, spring, and summer.

GOVT-226 Const, Pres Power, War on Terror Course Level: Undergraduate

The Constitution, Presidential Power, and the War on Terror (3) This course uses lessons from the U.S. historical record to inform consideration of the tension between government power and individual rights in the twenty-first century and especially since September 11, 2001. The course begins with case studies of expanded U.S. government power during times of crisis, including the Civil War, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and the Nixon presidency. The course then focuses on the ways in which executive power expanded during the War on Terrorism and on the question of whether new presidential administrations will change course, or might be required to change course. Usually Offered: fall and spring.

GOVT-231 Politics in Developing World Course Level: Undergraduate

Politics in the Developing World (3) Political order and change in selected countries in Africa, Latin America, and Asia, emphasizing nation building, ideology, development, and the role of the military. Usually Offered: fall. Prerequisite: GOVT-130.

GOVT-233 Communism/Capitalism in E.Asia Course Level: Undergraduate

Communism and Capitalism in East Asia (3) This course focuses on the theories of communism and capitalism, as well as their respective practices in East Asia and implications for socioeconomic and political development in the region. More specifically, the course examines the political and economic systems, processes, and changes in East Asia including China and Taiwan, North and South Korea, Japan, and Singapore. Major contemporary issues and policies of the East Asian systems are also surveyed, with particular emphasis on how the East Asian societies' socioeconomic and political performance, as well as their cultural traditions, affects these regimes' claim to political legitimacy. Usually Offered: alternate falls. Prerequisite: GOVT-130.

GOVT-235 Political Conflict Course Level: Undergraduate

Political Conflict FA3 (3) Theoretical perspectives on political change together with case studies of societies in which the status quo has broken down. Emphasis on the political, cultural, social, and psychological aspects of domestic crisis and revolution, with the objective of increasing awareness and appreciation of other nations and their struggles. AU Core Habits of Mind: Socio-Historical Inquiry. Usually Offered: fall, spring, and summer.

GOVT-240 Metropolitan Politics Course Level: Undergraduate

Metropolitan Politics (3) This course explores the political development of municipalities, counties, and metropolitan areas of the United States. The course examines the historic and contemporary interactions of ethnic and racial groups in metropolitan areas, and how these groups have shaped the political organizations and governing structures that prevail on the local level. Students are assigned readings and view documentaries that are relevant to the various time periods covered in the course. They also do individual readings whose concepts they present to the class and in writing. AU Core Habits of Mind: Cultural Inquiry. Usually Offered: fall and spring.

GOVT-282 Intro to Women and Politics Course Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to Women and Politics (1) This course is an intensive introduction to women and politics. Students in the course gain an understanding of the historical struggle of women for political, economic, and educational rights, as well as the major actors who were or continue to be involved in these efforts. Usually Offered: fall.

GOVT-296 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

GOVT-310 Intro to Political Research Course Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to Political Research (3) An introduction to political science research, including the logic of analysis, research design, and the basics of quantitative analysis. Application of gathering data and of analytic and statistical techniques to contemporary political problems. Usually Offered: fall, spring, and summer. Prerequisite: GOVT-110 and STAT-202 or STAT-203 or STAT-204. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-310 Intro to Political Research Course Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to Political Research (3) Every day we are confronted with puzzles about social behavior, and the theories people deploy to explain them. This course offers an introduction to political science research including how theories are generated, operationalized, and tested, how studies are designed, and how data is collected and analyzed using statistical techniques. By engaging with cutting-edge research and developing their own major project applying analytic and statistical methods to contemporary political problems, students develop essential research skills. AU Core Integrative Requirement: Quantitative Literacy II. Prerequisite: GOVT-110, and STAT-202, STAT-203, or STAT-204. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-315 Elections and Voting Behavior Course Level: Undergraduate

Elections and Voting Behavior (3) Focuses on public opinion, participation, and voting and campaign strategy in elections, with attention to issues of representation and democracy. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Prerequisite: GOVT-110. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-320 The Presidency Course Level: Undergraduate

The Presidency (3) The role of the presidency in the political system, including presidential power, personality, response to public opinion, interaction with the cabinet and bureaucracy, Congress, and political parties. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Prerequisite: GOVT-110. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-321 Congress& Legislative Behavior Course Level: Undergraduate

Congress and Legislative Behavior (3) Congressional behavior, Congress as an institution, and the role of Congress in policymaking. Includes field research on Capitol Hill. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Prerequisite: GOVT-110. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-322 American Political Parties Course Level: Undergraduate

American Political Parties (3) As they often are, American political parties are in an era of great changes and great challenges. This course introduces students to the big ideas of American political parties, such as the original conflicts between Hamilton and Jefferson and key nineteenth and twentieth century party debates. Students learn from original documents and traditional scholarship, along with fiction and non-fiction that includes William L. Riordan's Plunkitt of Tammany Hall, Ayn Rand's Anthem, Che Guevara's Motorcycle Diaries, and Hamilton: An American Musical. Students also study current questions and look ahead. AU Core Habits of Mind: Socio-Historical Inquiry. Usually Offered: spring. Prerequisite: GOVT-110.

GOVT-323 Interest Group Politics Course Level: Undergraduate

Interest Group Politics (3) Students are introduced to central concepts of interest group politics to prepare for effective citizenship whether as an interested voter, professional lobbyist, elected official, or political consultant. The course examines why individuals organize to influence governmental policies, the variety of interests represented, and the range and effectiveness of strategies employed. It focuses on the effects of individual preferences, governmental structure, and the political environment on group strategies and governmental response. Prerequisite: GOVT-110. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-325 Minority Politics in the U.S. Course Level: Undergraduate

Minority Politics in the United States (3) Topics vary by section. How various minority groups have shaped the American political system, and how American political structures have affected their involvement in the political process at the local, state, and national levels. Usually Offered: spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-333 Government and Politics of EU Course Level: Undergraduate

Government and Politics of the European Union (3) Offered as part of the AU Abroad program in Brussels, Belgium, this course is an in-depth study of the governance, politics, and evolution of the European Union (EU). It studies the EU's institutions, and the dynamics of its internal and external policy- making processes. In this course, students learn about the structure and powers of all of the EU institutions, how these institutions interact with each other and with the member states, and the dynamics of the EU's legislative and policy processes. Students also examine the process of accession for the countries of Central and Eastern Europe, discuss the EU's emerging Common Foreign and Security Policy, and consider what the evolution of the EU means for the rest of the world. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-335 Democratization: Theory/Pract Course Level: Undergraduate

Democratization: Theory and Practice (3) An exploration of the causes and outcomes of the most recent wave of global democratization since the late twentieth century. After an initial focus on different conceptualizations of democracy, the course addresses the latest wave of democratization and compares it to earlier waves of these changes. The course considers changes in governing institutions which accompany democratic change, and whether such changes carry implications for the quality of governance of nations. Prospects for further global democratic consolidation are examined, as is the trend of reversion to authoritarian regimes. AU Core Habits of Mind: Socio-Historical Inquiry. Usually Offered: fall. Prerequisite: GOVT-130. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-337 Authoritarianism in Modern Era Course Level: Undergraduate

Authoritarianism in the Modern Era (3) This course introduces students to modern authoritarian types, from fascism to bureaucratic authoritarianism, to hybrid regimes that incorporate elements of democracy and autocracy. The course begins by examining theories of authoritarianism and then considers the myriad examples of states which did or still do hold to these systems of rule. Usually Offered: spring. Grading: A-F only. Prerequisite: GOVT-130. Restriction: minimum 2.5. GPA.

GOVT-352 Law and the Political System Course Level: Undergraduate

Law and the Political System (3) Basic concepts of law and the American legal system. Analysis of the role of courts in the policy-making process. Problems of law enforcement and the correctional system. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-391 Internship Course Level: Undergraduate

Internship (1-6) Internships with interest groups, congressional offices, and government agencies. Weekly seminar. Prerequisite: junior standing. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA. Permission: department.

GOVT-396 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-403 Ancient Political Thought Course Level: Undergraduate

Ancient Political Thought (3) An in-depth approach to political philosophy beginning with the pre-Socratics and extending through the Platonic dialogues, Aristotle, and Roman civil law. Crosslist: GOVT-603. Usually Offered: fall. Prerequisite: GOVT-105. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-405 Modern Political Thought Course Level: Undergraduate

Modern Political Thought (3) Works of major political theorists from the sixteenth to the twentieth century and their application to current questions of theory and method. Included are Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Mill, Hegel, Marx, and others. Crosslist: GOVT-605. Usually Offered: spring. Prerequisite: GOVT-105. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-406 American Political Thought Course Level: Undergraduate

American Political Thought (3) Concepts and theories on the nature and operation of American politics and government. Crosslist: GOVT-606. Prerequisite: GOVT-105. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-408 America in European Pol Thght Course Level: Undergraduate

The Idea of America in European Political Thought: 1492-Present (3) From the "discovery" of America until today; this course examines what America has meant to thinkers from the Old World. It includes Columbus' discovery; views of the Indians; the Enlightenment's idealization of America as nature; reactions to the American Revolution; twentieth-century critiques of America as overly technological; and reactions to 9/11 Crosslist: GOVT-608. Prerequisite: GOVT-105. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-409 Contemporary Political Thought Course Level: Undergraduate

Contemporary Political Thought (3) This course examines important works in political theory from the late nineteenth/ early twentieth century to the present, with a view to the major upheavals that distinguish this era. Themes addressed include Marxism, fascism/totalitarianism, liberalism, conservatism, communitarianism, libertarianism, postmodernism, and others. Crosslist: GOVT-609. Usually Offered: spring. Prerequisite: GOVT-105. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-410 Wash Sem/Amer Gov & Pol Sem I Course Level: Undergraduate

Washington Semester in American Government and Politics Seminar I (4) Students study the U.S. government in action through seminars, conferences, lectures, and guided seminar evaluations of experience. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Restriction: Washington Semester Program.

GOVT-411 Wash Sem/Amer Gov& Pol Sem II Course Level: Undergraduate

Washington Semester in American Government and Politics Seminar II (4) Students study the U.S. government in action through seminars, conferences, lectures, and guided seminar evaluations of experience. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Restriction: Washington Semester Program.

GOVT-412 Wash Sem/Am Gov & Pol Res Proj Course Level: Undergraduate

Washington Semester in American Government and Politics Research Project (4) An individual report prepared under the guidance of the academic directors of the program. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Restriction: Washington Semester Program.

GOVT-422 Studies in Political Behavior Course Level: Undergraduate

Studies in Political Behavior (3) Topics vary by section. Examples are personality and politics, and political socialization. Crosslist: GOVT-622. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: 6 credit hours of GOVT/SPA coursework at the 300-level or above. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-423 Advanced Studies in Pub Policy Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Public Policy (3) Topics vary by section. Seminars on such topics as hunger, poverty, housing, education, job training, healthcare, unemployment, welfare, and conservation. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: GOVT-210. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-424 Campaign Finance Course Level: Undergraduate

Campaign Finance (3) Money in politics is one of the most consistently controversial and compelling topics in American elections. Fundamental issues of free speech, government regulation, and public participation in the democratic process are all related to campaign finance policy and law. Few other areas of American politics and law have evolved in recent years as substantially as campaign finance. This course explores campaign finance in federal elections and public policy and provides an opportunity to learn about an area that is politically, practically, and academically essential to the democratic process. The course examines how campaign finance policy has evolved, the intersection of policy and law, and how money and politics are important in campaigns and governing. Crosslist: GOVT-624. Grading: A-F only. Prerequisite: GOVT-110. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-425 Jazz & Civil Rights Movement Course Level: Undergraduate

Jazz and the Civil Rights Movement (3) This course examines the relationship between jazz and the twentieth-century African American Civil Rights Movement. Topics covered include how jazz confronted racial discrimination through direct action and how jazz worked with major civil rights organizations to provide financial support for the movement. Usually Offered: spring. Prerequisite: junior standing. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-426 U.S. Intelligence Community Course Level: Undergraduate

U.S. Intelligence Community (3) This course examines the agencies which make up the intelligence community and activities in which those agencies engage: collection of intelligence, counterintelligence, covert action, and analysis. The sources of conflict between members, direction and management of the community, secrecy and public control, and proposals for reform are also covered. Guest participants from research institutes and government; and independent authors. Crosslist: GOVT-626. Usually Offered: spring. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-427 Gov Regulation & Deregulation Course Level: Undergraduate

Government Regulation and Deregulation (3) The controversial role of government in regulating lifestyles and business enterprises. Includes antitrust policy; health, safety, and environmental issues as well as social and moral questions; corporate, consumer, and special interest lobbying; effects of deregulation; and regulatory reform. Crosslist: GOVT-627. Usually Offered: spring. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-430 Homeland Security Course Level: Undergraduate

Principles of Homeland Security (3) This course analyses the nature and character of terrorism threats and the vulnerabilities facing the United States to gain insights on the relationships between war and national security, and between the domestic, regional, and international dimensions of terrorism and war. This course builds a conceptual framework to analyze terrorism systematically and to distinguish between strategy and policy. It also focuses on the relationship between homeland security and the international security environment, including the U.S. interagency coordination process and the dynamic of international cooperation in the War on Terrorism. Crosslist: GOVT-630. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-431 Watergate: Constitutnl Crisis Course Level: Undergraduate

Watergate: A Constitutional Crisis (3) Watergate threatened the very foundations of our constitutional government. Despite a corrupt presidency, other vital institutions of American democracy, including a free press, came to the rescue. Aimed at a generation not born until decades after President Richard Nixon's resignation, this course is designed to inspire students to learn more about a crucial chapter in U.S. history. Crosslist: GOVT-631. Usually Offered: fall. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-432 Pol Inst& Process in Sel Count Course Level: Undergraduate

Political Institutions and Processes in Selected Countries (3) Topics vary by section. The nature of political institutions and processes of specific countries, such as Great Britain, Germany, France, the former Soviet Union, Israel, Iran, Greece, India, Turkey, and Mexico. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: GOVT-130 or GOVT-231 or GOVT-232. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-433 Topics Sub-Saharan African Pol Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Sub-Saharan African Politics (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics course examine the political development of African states south of the Sahara Desert and the nature of politics in Sub-Saharan Africa generally and by country. Usually Offered: alternate falls (even years). Repeatable for credit with different topic. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-440 Minority Rep & Ethnic Conflict Course Level: Undergraduate

Minority Representation and Ethnic Conflict (3) Ethnic conflicts are the major barriers to peace and democracy around the world. This course grapples with how political institutions can be constructed to produce stable and successful democracies. It focuses on how minorities have gone from oppression to representation, starting with African Americans and Latinos in the United States, but also in European, African, Asian, and Latin American countries. Students have wide latitude to design the major course assignment around the country or problem that most interest them. Usually Offered: fall. Prerequisite: GOVT-130. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-441 Politics of Mass Communication Course Level: Undergraduate

The Politics of Mass Communication (3) Effects of mass communication on all levels of political life in modern societies including socialization, participation, information, and opinion. Analysis of the relationship between mass communication and politics within a comparative context, i.e., societies with differing media structures (predominantly commercial, public, or state systems). Crosslist: GOVT-641. Usually Offered: spring. Prerequisite: 6 credit hours of GOVT/SPA coursework at or above the 300-level. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-443 Applied Political Writing Course Level: Undergraduate

Applied Political Writing (3) This course provides students with the writing skills necessary for success in political fields, from campaign politics to political journalism to Congressional offices and issue advocacy organizations. Each student develops a portfolio of writing samples that can be used in applying for positions and/or demonstrating skills, and becomes familiar with the tools and techniques of expository and persuasive writing needed in the world of politics. The course emphasizes clarity and precision as well as the forms, substantive knowledge, and creativity important in political writing. Crosslist: GOVT-643. Usually Offered: fall, spring, and summer. Prerequisite: 6 credit hours of GOVT/SPA coursework at or above the 300-level. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-444 Political Speechwriting Course Level: Undergraduate

Political Speechwriting (3) This course concentrates on the basic skills of speechwriting and techniques of successful presentation and delivery. Includes guest lectures and multimedia presentations that illustrate rhetorical skills and devices used by notable and successful public speakers throughout history. Crosslist: GOVT-644. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Prerequisite: 6 credit hours of GOVT/SPA coursework at or above the 300-level. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-444 Political Speechwriting Course Level: Undergraduate

Political Speechwriting (3) This course concentrates on the basic skills of speechwriting and techniques of successful presentation and delivery. Includes guest lectures and multimedia presentations that illustrate rhetorical skills and devices used by notable and successful public speakers throughout history. Crosslist: GOVT-644. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Prerequisite: 6 credit hours of GOVT/SPA coursework at the 300-level or above. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-445 Pol Parties/Int Grp & Lobbying Course Level: Undergraduate

Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Lobbying (3) The roles, functions, and changing nature of political parties and interest groups in American politics, the impact of political party reforms on the parties, and the ways in which parties and interest groups shape public policy. Crosslist: GOVT-645. Usually Offered: spring. Prerequisite: GOVT-322 or GOVT-323. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-450 Politics in Cuba Course Level: Undergraduate

Politics in Cuba (3) An examination of the social, economic, and political roots of the Cuban revolution of 1959 and the changes brought about in Cuban politics and society as a result of the revolution. Usually Offered: fall. Prerequisite: GOVT-130. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-455 Equal Protection Course Level: Undergraduate

Equal Protection (3) Examination of the evolution of federal civil rights law and modern interpretations of the major statutory and constitutional provisions that guarantee equal protection. Emphasis is on constitutional development under the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments and major congressional legislation that bans discrimination in employment, education, housing, etc., based on race, ethnic origin, gender, religion, and color. Also examines emerging legal developments intended to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and physical or mental disability. Usually Offered: fall. Prerequisite: GOVT-226, SPA-220, SPA-350, or SPA-351. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-461 Politics in the TV Age Course Level: Undergraduate

Politics in the Television Age (3) The relationship between television and American politics. Includes the concept of news; the changing role of television; the politics of newsmaking; the election campaign and the emergence of the political consultant; "tele-diplomacy"; and research tools for analyzing television news. Prerequisite: GOVT-110. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-464 Politics/Policy in Digital Age Course Level: Undergraduate

Politics and Policy in the Digital Age (3) This course examines the impact technology, especially the Internet, has on the American political system. Specifically, students evaluate how technology impacts subsystems including interest groups, Congress, and executive agencies. The class focuses on real-world applications of technology in politics through guest speakers and site visits. Crosslist: GOVT-664. Usually Offered: fall. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-465 Politics and the Internet Course Level: Undergraduate

Politics and the Internet (3) This course examines the history and evolution of the Internet; its impact on our daily lives; and the various ways in which the Internet has embedded itself into the political landscape. The course also looks at the impact of the Internet on the media and reaching constituents as a two-way medium Crosslist: GOVT-665. Usually Offered: summer. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-482 Women and Politics Course Level: Undergraduate

Women and Politics (3) This course examines the evolutionary role of women in politics-as voters, citizens, candidates, and leaders-from the Seneca Falls Convention to the present. The role of women's organizations and movements in the expansion of political and legal rights are also explored. Crosslist: GOVT-682. Prerequisite: GOVT-110. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-483 Women, Politics & Public Pol Course Level: Undergraduate

Women, Politics, and Public Policy (3) A wide variety of issues of concern to women, including healthcare, welfare, educational equity, employment discrimination, and reproductive rights are examined through the lens of the formal policy-making process. Crosslist: GOVT-683. Prerequisite: GOVT-110. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-484 Women & Political Leadership Course Level: Undergraduate

Women and Political Leadership (3) This course explores the historical evolution of women as leaders, the factors that have limited the number of women in leadership positions, and the differences in men's and women's leadership styles. Crosslist: GOVT-684. Prerequisite: GOVT-110. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-485 Topics in Women and Politics Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Women and Politics (1-4) Topics vary by section. Topics include reproductive rights, women's health policy, women and campaigns, women in the media, and Title IX. Crosslist: GOVT-685. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: GOVT-110. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-486 Feminist Political Theory Course Level: Undergraduate

Feminist Political Theory (3) This course traces the major debates in feminist political theory and their roots in liberalism, communitarianism, Marxism, post-modernism, and other schools of thought and examines the ways in which feminist political theory can inform current policy debates concerning women. Crosslist: GOVT-686. Usually Offered: fall. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA. Note: One course in political theory, philosophy, or women's and gender studies required.

GOVT-489 CLEG Seminar Course Level: Undergraduate

CLEG Seminar (3) Selected topical issues cutting across the disciplines of communication, law, economics, and political science. Primarily for CLEG (Communication, Legal Institutions, Economics, and Government) majors. Examples of issues are communication law and regulation, First Amendment rights and the media, and United States trade policy. Usually Offered: spring. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-490 Ind Study Project in Govern Course Level: Undergraduate

Independent Study Project in Government (1-6) Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA. Permission: instructor and department chair.

GOVT-492 Seminar for Teaching Assistant Course Level: Undergraduate

Seminar for Teaching Assistants (3-4) Exclusively for those who serve as teaching assistants in the Washington Laboratory, this course focuses on curriculum planning, group dynamics in classroom and field trip settings, role differentiation, and evaluation of student performance. Enhances leadership and communication skills. Usually Offered: fall. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA. Permission: instructor.

GOVT-496 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-520 Adv Studies in Campaign Mgmt Course Level: 500-LEVEL Course

Advanced Studies in Campaign Management (4) The Campaign Management Institute (CMI) is a nationally-recognized program designed to train individuals for participation in local, state, and federal political campaigns. Developed and taught by strategists from the Republican and Democratic parties, national campaign consultants, and political scientists, the intensive two-week program serves as a valuable foundation for political activists and campaign managers. The institute comprehensively covers campaign techniques, strategy, and tactics with emphasis on technological developments. Student teams develop a campaign plan and present it to a professional panel. Prerequisite: GOVT-110 or GOVT-620. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-521 Topics in Campaign Management Course Level: 500-LEVEL Course

Topics in Campaign Management (1) Topics vary by section. One-credit hour advanced workshops conducted by campaign professionals are offered in areas such as campaign media production and strategy; campaign fundraising; get-out-the-vote; and election analysis. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: GOVT-110 or GOVT-620. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-523 The Art and Craft of Lobbying Course Level: 500-LEVEL Course

The Art and Craft of Lobbying (3-4) The Public Affairs and Advocacy Institute (PAAI) is an intensive two-week program in major aspects of professional lobbying and influencing the policymaking process featuring speakers from the American University faculty and prominent professional lobbyists representing corporations, trade, and professional associations, public interest and other citizen groups, labor unions, as well as law and lobbying firms. The institute examines the full range of strategies and tactics pursued by organized interests and their lobbyists in attempting to gain access, obtain and exchange information, and influence policy makers in Congress and the executive branch. Student teams create a strategic lobbying plan on an important current public policy issue for a prospective client and present it to a professional panel. Prerequisite: GOVT-110 or GOVT-620. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-524 Topics in Pub Affairs/Advocacy Course Level: 500-LEVEL Course

Topics in Public Affairs and Advocacy (1) Topics vary by section. One-credit hour advanced workshops conducted by public affairs professionals are offered in specific public affairs areas such as grass roots lobbying; coalition building; and lobbying on the Internet. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: GOVT-110 or GOVT-620. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-603 Ancient Political Thought Course Level: Graduate

Ancient Political Thought (3) A consideration of the principles that differentiate pre-modern political thought from modern political thought. Readings include Aristophanes, Plato, and Aristotle. In alternate years, such authors as Thucydides, Xenophon, Cicero, Plutarch, and others are considered selectively. Crosslist: GOVT-403. Usually Offered: fall.

GOVT-605 Modern Political Thought Course Level: Graduate

Modern Political Thought (3) Works of major political theorists from the sixteenth to the twentieth century and their application to current questions of theory and method. Included are Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Mill, Hegel, Marx, and others. Crosslist: GOVT-405. Usually Offered: spring.

GOVT-606 American Political Thought Course Level: Graduate

American Political Thought (3) Concepts and theories on the nature and operation of American politics and government. Crosslist: GOVT-406.

GOVT-608 America in European Pol Thght Course Level: Graduate

The Idea of America in European Political Thought: 1492-Present (3) From the "discovery" of America until today; this course examines what America has meant to thinkers from the Old World. It includes Columbus' discovery; views of the Indians; the Enlightenment's idealization of America as nature; reactions to the American Revolution; twentieth-century critiques of America as overly technological; and reactions to 9/11. Crosslist: GOVT-408.

GOVT-609 Contemporary Political Thought Course Level: Graduate

Contemporary Political Thought (3) This course examines important works in political theory from the late nineteenth/ early twentieth century to the present, with a view to the major upheavals that distinguish this era. Themes addressed include Marxism, fascism/totalitarianism, liberalism, conservatism, communitarianism, libertarianism, postmodernism, and others. Crosslist: GOVT-409. Usually Offered: spring.

GOVT-615 Research Design Course Level: Graduate

Research Design (3) A survey of political science research methodologies focusing on qualitative, theoretical, and empirical alternatives to positivistic approaches, based on new philosophies of science such as scientific realism. Includes alternative means of data development, cultural, structural, and functional theories applicable to political research, and theory testing. Usually Offered: spring. Restriction: PhD program.

GOVT-620 Appl Politics & Am Pub Policy Course Level: Graduate

Applied Politics and American Public Policy (3) Examination of the content and dynamics of American public policymaking, with emphasis on how the domestic policy process functions, how to evaluate policy, and how to assess the different components of various policy domains. Explores the relationship between applied political action and the formation and implementation of public policy. Usually Offered: fall. Restriction: Political Science (MA) or Political Communication (MA).

GOVT-622 Studies in Political Behavior Course Level: Graduate

Studies in Political Behavior (3) Topics vary by section. Examples are personality and politics, and political socialization. Crosslist: GOVT-422. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

GOVT-624 Campaign Finance Course Level: Graduate

Campaign Finance (3) Money in politics is one of the most consistently controversial and compelling topics in American elections. Fundamental issues of free speech, government regulation, and public participation in the democratic process are all related to campaign finance policy and law. Few other areas of American politics and law have evolved in recent years as substantially as campaign finance. This course explores campaign finance in federal elections and public policy and provides an opportunity to learn about an area that is politically, practically, and academically essential to the democratic process. The course examines how campaign finance policy has evolved, the intersection of policy and law, and how money and politics are important in campaigns and governing. Crosslist: GOVT-424. Grading: A-F only.

GOVT-626 U.S. Intelligence Community Course Level: Graduate

U.S. Intelligence Community (3) This course examines the agencies which make up the intelligence community and activities in which those agencies engage: collection of intelligence, counterintelligence, covert action, and analysis. The sources of conflict between members, direction and management of the community, secrecy and public control, and proposals for reform are also covered. Guest participants from research institutes and government; independent authors. Crosslist: GOVT-426. Usually Offered: spring.

GOVT-627 Gov Regulation & Deregulation Course Level: Graduate

Government Regulation and Deregulation (3) The controversial role of government in regulating lifestyles and business enterprises. Includes antitrust policy; health, safety, and environmental issues as well as social and moral questions; corporate, consumer, and special interest lobbying; effects of deregulation; and regulatory reform. Crosslist: GOVT-427. Usually Offered: spring.

GOVT-628 Proseminar in Political Comm Course Level: Graduate

Proseminar in Political Communication (1) This introduction to political communication examines the role of communication in politics and the interplay of news, politics, advocacy, and public policy. The course provides students with the opportunity to process, analyze, and discuss current events through a political communication prism. Usually Offered: fall. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Restriction: Political Communication (MA).

GOVT-629 Capstone in Political Comm Course Level: Graduate

Capstone in Political Communication (3) This seminar is the culmination of the MA in Political Communication and provides support for the required capstone project. This project involves development of an original question, critical thinking, and extensive research and analysis leading to a logical and defensible conclusion and/or recommendations for further study. Usually Offered: spring. Prerequisite: completion of 27 credit hours. Restriction: Political Communication (MA).

GOVT-630 Homeland Security Course Level: Graduate

Principles of Homeland Security (3) This course analyses the nature and character of terrorism threats and the vulnerabilities facing the United States to gain insights on the relationships between war and national security, and between the domestic, regional, and international dimensions of terrorism and war. This course builds a conceptual framework to analyze terrorism systematically and to distinguish between strategy and policy. It also focuses on the relationship between homeland security and the international security environment, including the U.S. interagency coordination process and the dynamic of international cooperation in the War on Terrorism. Crosslist: GOVT-430.

GOVT-631 Watergate: Constitutnl Crisis Course Level: Graduate

Watergate: A Constitutional Crisis (3) Watergate threatened the very foundations of our constitutional government. Despite a corrupt presidency, other vital institutions of American democracy, including a free press, came to the rescue. Aimed at a generation not born until decades after President Richard Nixon's resignation, this course is designed to inspire students to learn more about a crucial chapter in U.S. history. Crosslist: GOVT-431. Usually Offered: fall.

GOVT-641 Politics of Mass Communication Course Level: Graduate

The Politics of Mass Communication (3) Effects of mass communication on all levels of political life in modern societies; including socialization, participation, information, and opinion. Analysis of the relationship between mass communication and politics within a comparative context, i.e., societies with differing media structures (predominantly commercial, public, or state systems). Crosslist: GOVT-441. Usually Offered: spring.

GOVT-643 Applied Political Writing Course Level: Graduate

Applied Political Writing (3) This course provides students with the writing skills necessary for success in political fields, from campaign politics to political journalism to Congressional offices and issue advocacy organizations. Each student develops a portfolio of writing samples that can be used in applying for positions and/or demonstrating skills, and becomes familiar with the tools and techniques of expository and persuasive writing needed in the world of politics. The course emphasizes clarity and precision as well as the forms, substantive knowledge, and creativity important in political writing. Crosslist: GOVT-443. Usually Offered: fall, spring, and summer.

GOVT-644 Political Speechwriting Course Level: Graduate

Political Speechwriting (3) This course concentrates on the basic skills of speechwriting and techniques of successful presentation and delivery. Includes guest lectures and multimedia presentations that illustrate rhetorical skills and devices used by notable and successful public speakers throughout history. Crosslist: GOVT-444. Usually Offered: fall and spring.

GOVT-645 Pol Parties/Int Grp & Lobbying Course Level: Graduate

Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Lobbying (3) The roles, functions, and changing nature of political parties and interest groups in American politics, the impact of political party reforms on the parties, and the ways in which parties and interest groups shape public policy. Crosslist: GOVT-445. Usually Offered: spring.

GOVT-650 Political Analysis Course Level: Graduate

Political Analysis (3) Methods of scientific analysis, including research formulation, hypothesis generation and testing, quantitative analysis, and computer techniques. Usually Offered: fall.

GOVT-651 The Legislative Process Course Level: Graduate

The Legislative Process (3) The function of the legislative branch in the American governmental system. Emphasis on Congress and comparison with state legislatures. Usually Offered: spring.

GOVT-652 Presidency & Executive Branch Course Level: Graduate

The Presidency and the Executive Branch (3) Analysis of presidential roles and of the function of the federal executive branch. Presidential personality, executive-legislative relations, and policy formation. Usually Offered: fall.

GOVT-653 Intro to Quant Meth in Pol Sci Course Level: Graduate

Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Political Science (3) Application of techniques of bivariate analysis to measurement of political behavior; emphasis on techniques relevant for political scientists and students of public administration. Usually Offered: spring. Prerequisite: GOVT-650.

GOVT-656 Voting Behav,Electns& Campgns Course Level: Graduate

Voting Behavior, Elections, and Campaigns (3) Political participation and behavior in U.S. primaries and elections, management of campaigns, mass media, and political organizations.

GOVT-664 Politics/Policy in Digital Age Course Level: Graduate

Politics and Policy in the Digital Age (3) This course examines the impact technology, especially the Internet, has on the American political system. Specifically, students evaluate how technology impacts subsystems including interest groups, Congress, and executive agencies. The class focuses on real-world applications of technology in politics through guest speakers and site visits. Crosslist: GOVT-464. Usually Offered: fall.

GOVT-665 Politics and the Internet Course Level: Graduate

Politics and the Internet (3) This course examines the history and evolution of the Internet; its impact on our daily lives; and the various ways in which the Internet has embedded itself into the political landscape. The course also looks at the impact of the Internet on the media and reaching constituents as a two-way medium. Crosslist: GOVT-465. Usually Offered: summer.

GOVT-674 Constitutional Law & Politics Course Level: Graduate

Constitutional Law and Politics (3) Involvement of American courts in such issues as legitimacy, conflict resolution, and representation; courts as political actors with respect to federalism; powers and limitations of government; advancement of individual and group interests and rights.

GOVT-682 Women and Politics Course Level: Graduate

Women and Politics (3) This course examines the evolutionary role of women in politics-as voters, citizens, candidates, and leaders-from the Seneca Falls Convention to the present. The role of women's organizations and movements in the expansion of political and legal rights are also explored. Crosslist: GOVT-482.

GOVT-683 Women, Politics & Public Pol Course Level: Graduate

Women, Politics, and Public Policy (3) A wide variety of issues of concern to women, including healthcare, welfare, educational equity, employment discrimination, and reproductive rights are examined through the lens of the formal policy-making process. Crosslist: GOVT-483.

GOVT-684 Women & Political Leadership Course Level: Graduate

Women and Political Leadership (3) This course explores the historical evolution of women as leaders, the factors that have limited the number of women in leadership positions, and the differences in men's and women's leadership styles. Crosslist: GOVT-484.

GOVT-685 Topics in Women and Politics Course Level: Graduate

Topics in Women and Politics (1-4) Topics vary by section. Topics include reproductive rights, women's health policy, women and campaigns, women in the media, and Title IX. Crosslist: GOVT-485. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

GOVT-686 Feminist Political Theory Course Level: Graduate

Feminist Political Theory (3) This course traces the major debates in feminist political theory and their roots in liberalism, communitarianism, Marxism, post-modernism, and other schools of thought and examines the ways in which feminist political theory can inform current policy debates concerning women. Crosslist: GOVT-486. Usually Offered: fall. Note: One course in political theory, philosophy, or women's and gender studies required.

GOVT-689 Seminar in U.S. Politics & Pol Course Level: Graduate

Seminar in U.S. Politics and Policy (3) This course provides a conceptual and practical understanding of how Washington works. Through exposure to political practitioners and policy makers, both elected and unelected, who influence legislation, execute decisions, resolve disputes, and help others win electoral office, the seminar provides a direct understanding of U.S. politics and policy. Students not only improve their skills in evaluating current policy proposals but also increase their factual knowledge of the structures, rules and processes of American politics. Restriction: Graduate Professional Studies. Permission: department.

GOVT-690 Ind Study in Gov & Polit Sci Course Level: Graduate

Independent Study Project in Government and Political Science (1-6) Permission: instructor and department chair.

GOVT-691 Internship Course Level: Graduate

Internship (1-6) Permission: instructor and department chair.

GOVT-696 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

GOVT-710 Seminar in American Politics Course Level: Graduate

Seminar in American Politics (3) Topics vary by section. Analysis of the operation of the presidency and the legislative branch and the impact of interest groups and parties on public policy. Topics vary, but the course concentrates on the design of research and critical examination of works in the field. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Restriction: PhD program.

GOVT-730 Sem in Comparative Politics Course Level: Graduate

Seminar in Comparative Politics (3) Analysis and critique of major theoretical approaches to the study of comparative politics in developed and developing worlds. Historical and theoretical foundations of the nation-state; political issues that arise from social change; and approaches to determining the relative autonomy of state institutions. Usually Offered: fall.

GOVT-733 Pol Institutions in Comp Persp Course Level: Graduate

Political Institutions in Comparative Perspective (3) The study of political institutions including political parties, interest groups, electoral behavior, legislatures and executives. Also examines political economy, neoinstitutionalism, theories of state and society, and formal modeling. Usually Offered: alternate springs.

GOVT-734 Democratization/Democrtc Inst Course Level: Graduate

Democratization: Past, Present, Future (3) This course helps students construct a cognitive road map of the extensive literature on democracy and democratization. The course mostly addresses recent processes (those of the last 25 years) of democratization, which have been concentrated in the developing world. In particular, the focus is on empirical examples from Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. After defining and measuring democracy, the class discusses democracy's causes and out puts, considers hybrid (with authoritarian and democratic characteristics) regimes, and democratic political institutions including government branches, political parties, electoral systems, and civil society groups. Prerequisite: GOVT-730 or GOVT-732.

GOVT-790 Doctoral Ind Study in Govt Course Level: Graduate

Doctoral Independent Study in Government (1-6) Permission: instructor and department chair.

GOVT-898 Doctoral Continuing Enrollment Course Level: Graduate

Doctoral Continuing Enrollment (1-9) May be taken by doctoral students completing coursework, exams or proposals in preparation for advancement to candidacy. May be taken with or without regular coursework. Tuition is assessed at the 1 credit rate. Academic load will be determined by total enrolled credits for the semester. Repeatable once for credit. Grading: SP/UP only. Restriction: Political Science (PhD). Permission: program director.

GOVT-899 Doctoral Dissertation Course Level: Graduate

Doctoral Dissertation (9) May be taken by doctoral students who are advanced to candidacy with the approval of the faculty supervising the dissertation (or designee). It is a 9 credit course, but tuition is assessed at the 1 credit rate. The course is graded SP/UP and students will be deemed full-time. The Office of the Registrar must be notified when a student has advanced to candidacy. Grading: SP/UP only. Restriction: doctoral students who have advanced to candidacy. Permission: program director.