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GOVERNMENT

GOVT-396 Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-396 001
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Jazz and Civil Rights Movement
This course acquaints students with an important and often neglected component of the twentieth-century Civil Rights Movement: how the jazz community in the United States became an important force for social, cultural, and political change on behalf of African-Americans and the civil rights movement more generally. In order to understand how musicians, promoters, journalists and music executives, and, by extension, ordinary Americans came together to confront Jim Crow and the discriminatory treatment of African-American musicians, it is necessary to understand the religious, musical and cultural traditions that Africans brought with them to the United States when they were imported as slaves.
GOVT-396 003
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Urban Politics in Comparative Perspective
This course examines case studies of urban activism and urban political development in global cities, participatory approaches to urban challenges, municipal government, the 'right to the city,' the politics of service provision, planning paradigms and their political assumptions and priorities, urban heritage conservation, and the growth of informal housing areas.
GOVT-396 004
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Comparative Authoritarianism
Francis Fukuyama (in)famously declared that the fall of the Soviet Union would be the end of history-in other words, there could be no more autocracy in the new era, only forms of liberal democracy would be left. Authoritarianism, however, has remained a powerful model for states across the world. This course introduces students to the different authoritarian types-from fascism to bureaucratic authoritarianism to the new hybrid regimes that incorporate elements of democracy and autocracy into their framework. The course begins by examining theories of authoritarianism and then considers the myriad examples of states which have or still do hold to undemocratic systems of rule. By the end of the course students should have a working knowledge of how to evaluate and compare authoritarian states across the world in the modern era (from 1900-today), giving them the tools to understand authoritarianism's enduring power.
GOVT-396 002
Term: FALL 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title:
GOVT-396 003
Term: FALL 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title:
GOVT-396 005
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Political Theory: Issues and Texts
In this reading/discussion course held in conjunction with the lecture and debate programming of the Political Theory Institute (PTI), students read works by the PTI speakers as well as relevant original texts and information that the speakers analyze. Students attend PTI events and have meetings with several of the speakers. The course prepares students for the events and they learn in depth about an array of political theory issues and texts. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
GOVT-396 001
Term: FALL 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title:
GOVT-396 004
Term: FALL 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title:
GOVT-396 F01
Term: SUMMER 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: