You are here: Course Descriptions

GOVERNMENT

GOVT-496 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Restriction: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-496-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Politics of Peace in N Ireland
Politics of Peace in Northern Ireland (3) The Troubles in Northern Ireland claimed more than 3,000 lives between 1969 and 1995 and ruined many thousands more. This course considers the reasons for the conflict, the dynamics and processes that led to peace in the 1990s, and the likelihood of continued conflict. The course also assesses the problems of terrorism, the role of women in politics, the challenges of reforming the state in Northern Ireland, and the prospects for reconciliation. Meets with GOVT-696 001.
GOVT-496-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Programming App Pol Data Sci
Introduction to Programming in Applied Political Data Science (3) This course introduces concepts and techniques required to engage in modern applied political data analysis. Data science is often described as the intersection of statistics, programming, and substantive knowledge. This course develops skills in the first two, with application to questions in applied politics. Modern political data come from large-scale experiments, text, networks, and other survey and administrative sources. Students develop skills in data wrangling, visualization, collaborative version control, statistical modeling, and scientific presentation. Prerequisite: GOVT-310. Meets with GOVT-096 002 GOVT-696 002.
GOVT-496-001
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Intersect Business/Gov in Econ
Instructional Method: Online. The Intersection of Business and Government in the Nation's Economy (3) This course explores the complex relationship between business and government sectors that converge in the U.S. domestic and globalized economy. The course reviews the political, governmental, and judicial policies that create the current environment for business, and examines the respective roles played by the Congress, the executive branch, and the courts. There are also general comparisons between U.S. behaviors and institutions and those in Germany, the European Union, and China. Meets with GOVT-696 001.
GOVT-496-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Nietzsche/Theological-Pol Prob
Nietzsche and the Theological-Political Problem (3) This course examines Beyond Good and Evil with a view to recovering the psychological and political implications of post-modernism. For Nietzsche, epistemological questions cannot be considered apart from psychological questions, which in turn cannot be understood except as questions of power. Prerequisite: GOVT-105. Meets with GOVT-696 001.
GOVT-496-002
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Political Economy of Devel
The Political Economy of Development (3) This course reviews key themes in the political economy of development across the Global South. Core concepts in the field are reviewed drawing on empirical material from Latin America, East Asia, India, and China. Course readings and discussions analyze economic, institutional, and socio-political factors that shape the prospects for sustained growth and influence patterns of distribution and social incorporation. The course explores the challenges that accompany participation in world markets and considers how both economic and political factors motivate policy makers to advocate different degrees of economic openness. Focusing on the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, the course links global trends to shifts in the institutions and policies that impact development policies at the level of states and regions. Particular attention is devoted to the political economy underpinnings of fiscal and social policies and the balance between markets and states in channeling resources across sectors of economy and society alike. Meets with GOVT-696 002.
GOVT-496-003
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Supreme Court & Women's Rights
The Supreme Court and Women's Rights (3) This course examines the development of American law affecting women from the seventeenth century to the present. It focuses on Supreme Court cases addressing women's citizenship, voting rights, jury service, age of majority, military service, education, employment, sexual harassment, marriage, pregnancy and childbirth, and reproductive rights. Meets with GOVT-696 003.
GOVT-496-004
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Political Economy of Devel
The Political Economy of Development (3) This course reviews key themes in the political economy of development across the Global South. Core concepts in the field are reviewed drawing on empirical material from Latin America, East Asia, India, and China. Course readings and discussions analyze economic, institutional, and socio-political factors that shape the prospects for sustained growth and influence patterns of distribution and social incorporation. The course explores the challenges that accompany participation in world markets and considers how both economic and political factors motivate policy makers to advocate different degrees of economic openness. Focusing on the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, the course links global trends to shifts in the institutions and policies that impact development policies at the level of states and regions. Particular attention is devoted to the political economy underpinnings of fiscal and social policies and the balance between markets and states in channeling resources across sectors of economy and society alike. Prerequisite: GOVT-130. Permission: instructor. Meets with ASIA-496 002 ASIA-696 002 GOVT-696 002.
GOVT-496-005
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Programming App Pol Data Sci
Introduction to Programming in Applied Political Data Science (3) This course introduces concepts and techniques required to engage in modern applied political data analysis. Data science is often described as the intersection of statistics, programming, and substantive knowledge. This course develops skills in the first two, with application to questions in applied politics. Modern political data come from large-scale experiments, text, networks, and other survey and administrative sources. Students develop skills in data wrangling, visualization, collaborative version control, statistical modeling, and scientific presentation. Prerequisite: GOVT-310. Meets with GOVT-696 005.