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GOVT-696 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

GOVT-696-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Politics of Peace in N Ireland
Politics of Peace in Northern Ireland (3) The Troubles in Northern Ireland claimed more than 3,000 lives between 1969 and 1995 and ruined many thousands more. This course considers the reasons for the conflict, the dynamics and processes that led to peace in the 1990s, and the likelihood of continued conflict. The course also assesses the problems of terrorism, the role of women in politics, the challenges of reforming the state in Northern Ireland, and the prospects for reconciliation. Meets with GOVT-496 001.
GOVT-696-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Programming App Pol Data Sci
Introduction to Programming in Applied Political Data Science (3) This course introduces concepts and techniques required to engage in modern applied political data analysis. Data science is often described as the intersection of statistics, programming, and substantive knowledge. This course develops skills in the first two, with application to questions in applied politics. Modern political data come from large-scale experiments, text, networks, and other survey and administrative sources. Students develop skills in data wrangling, visualization, collaborative version control, statistical modeling, and scientific presentation. Meets with GOVT-496 002.
GOVT-696-003
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Contemporary African Politics
Contemporary African Politics (3) This course is an introduction to the politics of Sub-Saharan Africa in the post-independence period. This is a comparative politics course, and most of the articles read are written by political scientists and economists. Rather than focusing on the internal politics of particular countries, the focus is on the academic study of contemporary African politics. Students are expected to have some background in political science, but they need not have any prior knowledge of Africa. Meets with GOVT-432 001.
GOVT-696-001
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Ind, Nation-Sts & Climate Chng
Individuals, Nation-States, and International Climate Change (3) This course considers climate change as a problem for ethics, philosophy, environmental studies, economics, comparative politics, and international relations. It frames specific policy debates in philosophical terms by considering assumptions about relations between humanity and nature implied in climate change discussions and in evolving policy objectives of mitigation versus adaptation. Students gain a fundamental understanding of climate change policy (and its obstacles) across a range of nations. Meets with GOVT-496 001.
GOVT-696-002
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Programming App Pol Data Sci
Introduction to Programming in Applied Political Data Science (3) This course introduces concepts and techniques required to engage in modern applied political data analysis. Data science is often described as the intersection of statistics, programming, and substantive knowledge. This course develops skills in the first two, with application to questions in applied politics. Modern political data come from large-scale experiments, text, networks, and other survey and administrative sources. Students develop skills in data wrangling, visualization, collaborative version control, statistical modeling, and scientific presentation.
GOVT-696-001
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Intersect Business/Gov in Econ
Instructional Method: Online. The Intersection of Business and Government in the Nation's Economy (3) This course explores the complex relationship between business and government sectors that converge in the U.S. domestic and globalized economy. The course reviews the political, governmental, and judicial policies that create the current environment for business, and examines the respective roles played by the Congress, the executive branch, and the courts. There are also general comparisons between U.S. behaviors and institutions and those in Germany, the European Union, and China. Meets with GOVT-496 001.