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HISTORY

HIST-296 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

HIST-296-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: U.S. Military History to 1865
U.S. Military History to 1865 (3) A survey of American military history from the Colonial period through the American Civil War. The class looks at the causes, course, and consequences of the major and minor wars that the United States fought during this period, with a focus on strategy, the evolution of the U.S. military, and the relevance of these issues for today.
HIST-296-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Modern Presidency: FDR-Trump
Modern Presidency: FDR to Trump (3) This course examines one of the most powerful offices in the history of the world, the modern American presidency. It focuses on presidents from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Donald Trump, but also explores the origins and development of the institution itself.
HIST-296-003
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: A History of the White House
A History of the White House (3) Explores the history of the White House and its many uses as a home, office, convening forum, and museum. The course touches on the architectural history of the building and its wings, the occupants and their relationship to the residence, the presidency and staff, and the history of the building's preservation.
HIST-296-004
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Fashion, Race and Gender
Fashion, Race and Gender (3) This course critically examines the ways in which fashion impacts and reflects power structures in Western society, particularly regarding race and gender. Students consider 18th through 20th century U.S. history by looking at the intersections of fashion, race, and gender to examine historical agency, social conformity, resistance, and cultural change. Topics include consumerism and the rise of the department store, identity formation, gendered and racial gaze, and the body as a site of struggle. Meets with AMST-220 002.
HIST-296-001
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: U.S. Military History
U.S. Military History (3) This course gives an overview of major issues in the history of U.S. military actions, strategy, and doctrine since 1865.
HIST-296-002
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Women in Classical Antiquity
Women in Classical Antiquity (3) Women in ancient Greece and Rome had few rights and freedom. They were legally and culturally considered as inferior to men. But it would be unfair to ignore the extraordinary complexities and ambiguities of women's lives in the ancient Mediterranean. This course sheds light on diverse historical and literary evidence, as well as material and visual culture. Students not only examine what women actually did and did not do, at home, in town and country, in secular and religious spaces, in slave quarters and royal courts, but also how they were perceived by their male contemporaries and what value to society they were believed to have. In so doing, the extent ancient Greece and Rome can be considered as the origins of Western attitudes towards women is evaluated.
HIST-296-003
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Introduction to Antiracism
Introduction to Antiracism (3) This course introduces students to the global history and current manifestations of antiracism. Students examine key thinkers, movements, and policies that have sought across time and space to eliminate racial inequities and discrimination. Meets with SISU-296 002.
HIST-296-001
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: History of U.S. Intelligence
History of U.S. Intelligence (3) Explores the history of U.S. intelligence organizations and operations since the early twentieth century, with special emphasis on the intelligence-policy nexus and the role of intelligence agencies in a democracy.