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HISTORY

HIST-396 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

HIST-396-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Black Power/Black Lives Matter
Black Power and Black Lives Matter (3) This course examines the global Black power movement in the late 1960s and early 1970s and its legacy in #BlackLivesMatter. Meet with SISU-396 001.
HIST-396-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Early Amer Women & Gender Hist
Early American Women's and Gender History (3) Organized along the premise that a "gender frontier" structured intercultural relations in early America, this course examines gender, including evolving perceptions and definitions of both femininity and masculinity, as a means of organizing society and culture in early North America. By examining women's diverse experiences from the sixteenth through the mid-nineteenth centuries, this course considers various topics in early American women's and gender history, including race, family, labor, politics, and religion.
HIST-396-003
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: American Victorian Culture
American Victorian Culture (3) This course explores a diverse range of cultural phenomena in the nineteenth-century United States, reflecting on how clothes, interior design, child rearing philosophies, nutritional advice, travel literature, and pets can shape society and politics.
HIST-396-001
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: American Drug Wars
American Drug Wars (3) This seminar introduces students to the concept of the war on drugs broadly interpreted, and surveys America's history with mind-altering substances and efforts to control or prohibit the same. America's battle with addiction has both greater longevity and importance than is generally appreciated. Beginning with the role of commodities such as coffee, sugar, tobacco, and alcohol in forging global trade routes and colonial empires, the course examines America's experience with drugs, alcohol, temperance movements, crime, and law enforcement from the early republic into the twentieth century with the birth of the modern drug war. Students are presented with American social, cultural, and political history "through the saloon door," and examine how taboos and attempts at prohibition have been historically contingent, as well as how drug and alcohol use has often been the site of profound political and social conflicts, many with lasting implications. Meets with AMST-396 001.