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INTERDISCIPLINARY

IDIS-151 AU Scholars Resrch Experience Course Level: Undergraduate

AU Scholars Research Experience (1) Topics vary by section. This course provides students with the opportunity to work in small groups to conduct a guided research or creative project on an interdisciplinary subject. Students learn discipline-specific research skills and present their completed projects at the AU Scholars research symposium. Usually Offered: spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Grading: A-F only. Restriction: AU Scholars.

IDIS-151-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Making a Hip-Hop Album
Making a Hip-Hop Album (1) Students in this course write, record, and produce a hip-hop album. From writing lyrics, beat production, graphic design, and studio recording, students learn the skills needed to produce an album with the same level of precision and creativity as their favorite artists.
IDIS-151-002
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Whose Downtown?
Whose Downtown? (1) Two blocks from the Capitol building sits one of the nation's largest homeless shelters. The shelter and the building that houses it have long and storied histories that are intertwined with national urban renewal and homeless assistance policies. However, proposals are calling for the demolition of the building for private redevelopment in 2021. Students in this course work with the Humanities Truck to document the experiences of the residents, share these experiences with other residents, and reflect on the past and future of the shelter so that the residents can engage more effectively with the planning processes that will dramatically impact their lives.
IDIS-151-003
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Contemporary World Cinema
Contemporary World Cinema: The Festival (1) The foreign movies available in the United States are only a fraction of the movies that are produced worldwide. Excellent movies are made in a variety of countries and never seen in the United States because producers fear that no one will "get" their movies and, therefore, these movies are never afforded the one thing that would make them accessible to U.S. audiences: subtitles. This course exposes audiences to new movies that might otherwise never have been seen before and, of course, get people to watch them. Students learn about subtitles and subtitling, from a theoretical and a practical standpoint.
IDIS-151-004
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Religious (Minorities) in DC
Religious (Minorities) in DC (1) The questions of what it means to be a religious minority and what role religious communities play in Washington, DC both as the capital of the United States and as a diverse and eclectic city are more closely related than it might seem. This seminar examines the religious landscape of DC, with a focus on how different religious communities have established themselves and how they understand their relationship to the federal government and the citizens of DC. Students explore physical geography, economics, race, ethnicity, class and power, among other factors, as they relate to the religious history of DC. A multi-modal final project brings these elements together in an effort to understand DC's religious diversity.
IDIS-151-005
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Sustainable Farming
Section Fee: $2,900.00. Travel Dates: March 8 - 15, 2019. Travel Location: Costa Rica. Students are responsible for obtaining excused absences for any missed classes during the off-campus travel period in accordance with the university academic regulations. Sustainable Farming (1) This course investigates where and how food is grown in Costa Rica and the effects of food production on the health of the natural environment including coastal and forest ecosystems and compares agroecological practices to industrial- and small-scale conventional farming practices. Students work in small research teams to develop and carry out projects that lead to web-based outcomes that tell stories about sustainable farming in Costa Rica. The course examines the recent history of Costa Rica and Costa Rica's natural resources, current environmental concerns, and sustainability goals. Students also acquire relevant tools of research and hear from experts to aid in project development. A key feature of the course is a week-long field research trip to Costa Rica during spring break.
IDIS-151-006
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Refugee or Terrorist?
Section Fee: $2,100.00. Travel Dates: March 8 - 15, 2019. Travel Location: Brussels and Amsterdam. Students are responsible for obtaining excused absences for any missed classes during the off-campus travel period in accordance with the university academic regulations. Refugee or Terrorist? Students in this course explore one of the most important intersections of policy and human experience: the migrant, the immigrant, and the emigre, and the policies and politics that try to govern the movement of people all over the world. At a time when this issue has burst onto the screens and pages of world news in new and old ways, there is a pressing need for in-depth, thoughtful research and analysis of who these people are and what is driving their movements, and the ways they are being used by politicians as political images of the oppressed or of threats.