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JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

JLC-413 Topics in Law & Social Science Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Law and Social Science (3) Topics vary by section. Topics include various disciplinary perspectives of law such as politics of law, law and anthropology; and the social scientific approach to specific areas of law, such as punishment and society, and law, technology, and society. Usually Offered: spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: JLC-302.

JLC-413-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Law and Popular Culture
Law and Popular Culture (3) This course explores the ways in which pop culture products in the form of film, television, theatre, art, and literature inform (whether accurately or not), reflect, affect, and change social views about the law and lawyers. The course looks at the role law plays in popular culture (for example, how law and lawyers are portrayed and perceived; how law shapes and defines pop culture) and the role popular culture plays in law and in the lives of lawyers (for example, the impact of cameras in the courtroom).
JLC-413-001
Term: Spring 2019 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Foundations of Knowledge
Foundations of Knowledge (3) This methodology course helps students identify what actually counts as knowing something in their study of social phenomena. Social scientists, lawyers, and philosophers must grapple with the question of what counts as a fact that actually describes what they believe they are observing. Making this decision inevitably affects one's understanding of what is being observed. This course examines the foundations of empirical, analytical, critical, and other modes of thought in order to enable them to evaluate the various methods used to study social institutions. Meets with JLC-604 001.
JLC-413-002
Term: Spring 2019 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Theories of Punishment
Theories of Punishment (3) Examination of the philosophical issues associated with criminal punishment, particularly theories of the moral justification for punishment. The course considers retributive, deterrent, incapacitation, and moral reform theories, the role of victim and community anger in the imposition of punishment, as well as alternatives such as restorative justice. Meets with JLC-676 001.