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JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

JLC-485 Topics in Terrorism Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Terrorism (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics concerning terrorism and security policy, including theories of terrorism and extremist violence, prevention of terrorism, and homeland security policy. Crosslist: JLC-685. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

JLC-485-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Psychology of Terrorism
Psychology of Terrorism (3) This course teaches students to explore in a rigorous, analytical way why people participate in political violence or terrorism; what psychological theories say about decisions to participate and how individuals and groups respond to violence; how these psychology theories compare to rational explanations of terrorism and political violence; how do canonical psychological experiments and theories help explain violence and terrorism, and other related questions. Meets with JLC-685 001.
JLC-485-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Dept of Homeland Sec Practicum
Department of Homeland Security Practicum (3) The Office of Policy of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) serves as a central resource to the secretary and other department leaders for strategic planning and analysis, and facilitation of decision making on the full breadth of issues that may arise across the dynamic homeland security enterprise. In support of the Office of Policy, this course examines the Department of Homeland Security's evolving law enforcement model. Students produce a policy white paper to explore how the DHS understands and practices the law enforcement elements of its mission. While DHS has a traditional law enforcement mission, it also has broader authorities and functions beyond traditional law enforcement. The practicum involves numerous targeted interviews with a range of DHS law enforcement officials as well as extensive research. The final product provides a baseline that defines the DHS law enforcement model, captures how it has evolved since 9/11, and recommends ways in which this model can be used in other places. Students work closely with staff at DHS, including providing monthly progress reviews, offering a mid-term update, and presenting the final product to DHS leaders. Permission: instructor. Meets with JLC-685 002.
JLC-485-003
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Strat/Tactics of Terrorist Org
Strategies and Tactics of Terrorist Organizations (3) This course explores internal dynamics of terrorist organizations. By engaging advanced scholarly literature that emphasizes generalizable theories and uses empirical evidence, students obtain better understanding of terrorist operational decisions and command and control issues. The course introduces students to theories of illicit organization behavior through a systematic study of decision-making, governance, and the selective use of violence. Students evaluate the scholarly literature in a critical yet constructive way and apply this research to their own academic and professional work. Finally, students have a greater substantive knowledge about how terrorist and other violent political organizations operate. Meets with JLC-685 003.
JLC-485-004
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Terrorist Mobilization
Terrorist Mobilization (3) This course examines terrorist mobilization at an individual level of analysis from both a theoretical and an empirical perspective. It focuses on processes of violent radicalization leading to terrorist involvement related to Al Qaeda and Islamic State, but also considers other varieties of modern and contemporary terrorism. Evidence focuses on recent and current expressions of terrorist mobilization in North America and Western Europe along with other world regions. Meets with JLC-685 004.
JLC-485-005
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Researching Terror Attacks
Researching Terror Attacks (3) Students become familiar with the methodology and sources of researching terrorist attacks through examining major terrorist attacks and plots in the West and elsewhere, focusing primarily on jihadist terrorism. The analysis of different actors and strategies behind these incidents, as well as of innovations in modus operandi and target selection, allow students to better understand the evolution of global terrorism and the global terrorist threat, including current trends. Meets with JLC-685 005.
JLC-485-001
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Transnatl Dimension Pol Viol
Instructional Method: Online. Transnational Dimensions of Political Violence (3) With the rise of ISIS in the Middle East and elsewhere, the term "foreign fighter" has entered mainstream discussions of terrorism and political violence in the twenty-first century. This course investigates the role that foreign fighters played in the Syria Civil War, as well as in other conflicts such as Chechnya, Kashmir, Somalia, and Nigeria, from an empirical perspective. Students learn about the role of transnational advocacy networks, funding sources, and international laws and policies that contribute to foreign fighter participation in civil conflicts. Students use social movement concepts such as resource mobilization theory, network analysis, ideological framing, and rational choice theory to assess and analyze a transnational conflict or actor of their choosing. Meets with JLC-685 001.
JLC-485-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Foreign Fighters
Foreign Fighters (3) This course provides an in-depth look at foreign fighters and policy responses to them. It focuses on jihadi militants but examines transnational volunteers for other religious, ethnic, and ideological causes as well. The course examines competing perspectives on radicalization, the internet, and the likelihood of "boomerang" attacks by returnees. Meets with JLC 685-001.
JLC-485-002
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Psychology of Terrorism
Instructional Method: Online. Psychology of Terrorism (3) This course teaches students to explore in a rigorous, analytical way why people participate in political violence or terrorism; what psychological theories say about decisions to participate and how individuals and groups respond to violence; how these psychology theories compare to "rational" explanations of terrorism and political violence; and how canonical psychological experiments and theories help explain violence and terrorism, and other related questions. Meets with JLC-685 003.