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LITERATURE

LIT-099 Maintain Matriculation Course Level: Graduate

LIT-107 Creative Writing Across Genres Course Level: Undergraduate

Creative Writing Across Genres FA1 (3) This course guides students into the world of creative communication through generative writing assignments, in-class critiques, writing workshops, and writerly appreciation of literary texts. Students explore multiple genres of writing including fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry, in preparation for upper-level creative writing workshops. AU Core Habits of Mind: Creative-Aesthetic Inquiry. Usually Offered: fall and spring.

LIT-121 Rethinking Literature Course Level: Undergraduate

Rethinking Literature FA1 (3) Topics vary by section. The course focuses on a compelling idea or area of inquiry rendered in literature. Students interrogate a range of literary and cultural texts in order to deepen their understanding of the literary endeavor. Rotating topics include poetry and the world, desire and identity, human nature after Darwin, the culture of detective fiction, etc. AU Core Habits of Mind: Creative-Aesthetic Inquiry. Usually Offered: fall, spring, and summer. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-125 Great Books: Western World Course Level: Undergraduate

Great Books that Shaped the Western World FA2 (3) This course enriches students' knowledge and appreciation of Western civilization by familiarizing them with some of the most important literary texts in Western literature from Homer through the nineteenth century. In addition to studying these works for their literary artistry, the course addresses the cultural context of these works, the ethical issues they address and the pivotal roles they have played in Western society, and what it means to call a work "a classic." Usually Offered: fall and spring.

LIT-146 Critical Appr to Cinema Course Level: Undergraduate

Critical Approach to the Cinema FA1 (3) This course offers an in-depth study of cinema as an art form, covering a range of film genres and styles, and exploring major cinematic developments in film structure and aesthetics. Students learn about formal cinematic elements through lectures, film screenings, discussions, close readings, visual and technical analyses, oral presentations, reviews, and short exercises, then interpret and analyze films more thoroughly by writing critical essays. AU Core Habits of Mind: Creative-Aesthetic Inquiry. Usually Offered: fall, spring, and summer. Note: The course includes mandatory weekly film screenings.

LIT-201 The Art of Changing Minds Course Level: Undergraduate

The Art of Changing Minds FA1 (3) Topics vary by section. Topics explore the long history of various forms of persuasive rhetoric, ranging from artful political speeches to political art, by examining how compelling sentences, speeches, essays, and other works of imaginative thinking in the rhetorical tradition are built on aesthetic categories such as sound, rhythm, image, and metaphor. Also explored is how the principles of rhetoric tradition are important in the interpretation, evaluation, and appreciation of visual and multi-modal rhetorical works that changed how people think. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-215 Writers in Print/Person Course Level: Undergraduate

Writers in Print/in Person FA1 (3) Offers students the opportunity to study works by contemporary authors and then to continue their exploration of these works in meetings with the writers. Features locally and nationally prominent writers, including American University writing faculty. AU Core Habits of Mind: Creative-Aesthetic Inquiry. Usually Offered: fall and spring.

LIT-215 Writers in Print/Person Course Level: Undergraduate

Writers in Print/in Person FA1 (3) Offers students the opportunity to study works by contemporary authors and then to continue their exploration of these works in meetings with the writers. Features locally and nationally prominent writers, including American University writing faculty. Usually Offered: fall and spring.

LIT-220 Survey of British Lit I Course Level: Undergraduate

Survey of British Literature I (3) A historical exploration of a range of writers in the British tradition, from Chaucer through the eighteenth century. Writers are examined as individual artists and as representatives of their age. Usually Offered: fall.

LIT-221 Survey of British Lit II Course Level: Undergraduate

Survey of British Literature II (3) A historical exploration of a range of writers in the British tradition, from the Romantic period through the twentieth century. Writers are examined as individual artists and as representatives of their age. Usually Offered: spring.

LIT-225 African Literature Course Level: Undergraduate

African Literature FA1 (3) We come to know the world through the stories that are told about it, but all too often African stories are told by people outside of the continent. This course immerses students in fiction and creative forms written by Africans. Students discuss some of the classics of African literature, read contemporary bestsellers, and talk about literature and translation in the digital age. They closely examine form, style, and language while also discussing the ways in which colonialism, race, gender, sexuality, migration, and everyday life are depicted and dramatized by African writers. AU Core Habits of Mind: Creative-Aesthetic Inquiry. Usually Offered: fall.

LIT-232 Shakespeare Course Level: Undergraduate

Shakespeare FA1 (3) Topics vary by section. How did Shakespeare become a giant of literature? This course offers a sampling of masterpieces from Shakespeare's career, examining his artistic development in the context of the issues of his day. Students read comedies, histories, and tragedies, attending to the ways Shakespeare experimented with dramatic and poetic forms and engage in analysis and interpretation by writing critical essays. Rotating topics include Shakespeare and politics, philosophy, religion, theatrical history and performance, as well as his cultural and artistic legacy. AU Core Habits of Mind: Creative-Aesthetic Inquiry. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-235 African American Lit Course Level: Undergraduate

African-American Literature FA2 (3) A survey of African-American literature beginning with the poet Phillis Wheatley and the slave narratives of the 1700s and concluding with Malcolm X and Toni Morrison. The emphasis is on the continuity of black writing within its historical and cultural contexts. AU Core Habits of Mind: Cultural Inquiry. Usually Offered: spring.

LIT-240 Asian American Literature Course Level: Undergraduate

Asian American Literature FA2 (3) The recent explosion of Asian American literature, defined as literature by writers of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian, Pakistani, and Filipino descent living in North America, warrants close and historically-informed analysis. This course considers works by Asian American writers in light of orientalism, issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and identity, and historical pressures such as immigration policies and independence movements. Students gain expertise on these issues through reading, presentations, and exams. AU Core Habits of Mind: Cultural Inquiry. Usually Offered: alternate springs.

LIT-245 The Experience of Poetry Course Level: Undergraduate

The Experience of Poetry FA1 (3) This course makes poetry more accessible and enjoyable through analysis, writing, and discussion. Students read poetry in a range of traditions, genres, and forms; write critical papers and responses; and also write and discuss their own poetry in a workshop format. Writing poetry gives students the opportunity to practice the craft of poetry and to explore their own creativity. AU Core Habits of Mind: Creative-Aesthetic Inquiry. Usually Offered: fall and spring.

LIT-246 Cinema & the Twentieth Century Course Level: Undergraduate

Cinema and the Twentieth Century FA1 (3) This course is a historical study of cinema as an art form through the twentieth century, covering major cinematic developments in aesthetic, technological, and cultural terms. Films are examined both as individual texts and within their historical and cultural contexts. AU Core Habits of Mind: Socio-Historical Inquiry. Usually Offered: spring.

LIT-250 Lit, Film & Globalization Course Level: Undergraduate

Literature, Film and Globalization FA3 (3) Globalization is a word we often hear, but what does it mean to live in a globalized world? This is a course about the different types of stories people tell in a world that is increasingly interconnected and yet still profoundly unequal. Through close, analytical examinations of films, novels, and narrative forms, students discuss how people, images, and ideas move across borders and how art can help us to understand the many contradictions of globalization. AU Core Habits of Mind: Creative-Aesthetic Inquiry. Usually Offered: fall and spring.

LIT-265 Lit & Soc in Vict Engl Course Level: Undergraduate

Literature and Society in Victorian England FA2 (3) A study of Victorian literature in its social, historical, and cultural contexts. The course explores literary works, such as novels, poems, and plays, as well as historical materials, and examines significant cultural issues of the era including industrialization, imperialism, art and aesthetics, science, gender, and sexuality, race, social class, and other important topics. Usually Offered: spring.

LIT-267 Literatures of Global South Course Level: Undergraduate

Literatures of the Global South FA3 (3) An introduction to literature written by writers from the Global South: Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The emphasis is on contemporary fiction and the ways that this writing depicts cultural and political change brought about by the impact of outside forces. AU Core Habits of Mind: Socio-Historical Inquiry. Usually Offered: fall and spring.

LIT-281 Power, Discourse & Pop Culture Course Level: Undergraduate

Power, Discourse, and Popular Culture FA2 (3) This course teaches students how to critically read popular texts and discourse. It examines cultural productions (e.g., novels, films, plays, television shows, social media, etc.) as well as a number of theoretical essays in order to investigate how different media forms impact systems of representation through which we understand power, identity, collectivity, and political agency. AU Core Habits of Mind: Cultural Inquiry. Usually Offered: spring.

LIT-281 Power, Discourse & Pop Culture Course Level: Undergraduate

Power, Discourse, and Popular Culture FA2 (3) This course teaches students how to critically read popular texts and discourse. It examines forms of cultural productions (novels, films, plays, television shows, etc.) as well as a number of theoretical essays in order to understand how regimes of power in the Western world have come to shape who we are as modern global subjects. Usually Offered: spring.

LIT-310 Major Authors Course Level: Undergraduate

Major Authors (3) Topics vary by section. Intensive study of the works of one or more important authors. Attention is paid to the evolution of the author's canon, to the effects of (and on) the literary context, to the relationship between works and biography, and to the historical and cultural context of the writer. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-311 Literature Colloquium Course Level: Undergraduate

Literature Colloquium (1) Students research and develop a written paper or presentation for the annual Literature Colloquium, a one-day conference of discussions, workshops, and panel presentations focused on exploring ways of understanding and thinking about a selected work. Usually Offered: fall. Repeatable for credit. Grading: A-F only. Note: Participation in the Literature Colloquium is required for Honors in Literature students.

LIT-315 Topics in American Romanticism Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in American Romanticism (3) Topics vary by section. American Romantic authors of the antebellum period reflected the effects of slavery, constraints on women, and materialism on the nation, and looked for the realization of a new age. Writers studied include Whitman, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Dickinson, Stowe, Poe, Sedgewick, Fuller, Douglass, and Jacobs. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-337 Topics in Restoration & 18th C Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Restoration and Enlightenment Literature (3) Topics vary by section. In seventeenth and eighteenth century Britain new literary forms, such as the novel and the autobiography, responded to the far-reaching changes in philosophy, politics, and religion of the Restoration and Enlightenment. Rotating topics include Milton, Restoration drama, and the rise of the British novel. Usually Offered: every other year. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-343 British & European Modernism Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in British and European Modernism (3) Topics vary by section. European modernist vision and techniques, such as free verse and stream of consciousness, are some of the innovations owed to Modernism that have profoundly influenced the way we see, hear, and feel. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-346 Topics in Film Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Film (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics include film and literature, national cinema, film genres, major filmmakers, and independent filmmakers. Usually Offered: fall. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-347 Spain/Latin America Lit & Film Course Level: Undergraduate

Spain and Latin America through Literature and Film (3) Through a survey of several different forms, contemporary Spanish and Latin American reality is presented in this course offered as part of the AU Abroad program in Madrid. It includes critical approaches to narrative textual discourses dealing with social structure and identity, and explores the relation between literature and film, showing Latin American countries as complex cultural arrangements in continuous redefinition.

LIT-360 Topics in Medieval Literature Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Medieval Literature (3) Topics vary by section. The literature of the Middle Ages reflects a radically different world view in writings that capture human beings at their best and worst moments. Rotating topics include Chaucer, Dante, and a survey of medieval literature. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-365 Mediterranean Literature Course Level: Undergraduate

Mediterranean Literature (3) Offered as part of the AU Abroad Madrid and the Mediterranean program. This course offers a review of the major Mediterranean world literary accomplishments of antiquity, the Renaissance, and the baroque, as well as contemporary Arab literature. Students become familiar with intrinsically Mediterranean topics such as epic travel, exile, and cross-fertilization among cultures, the works of Homer, Dante, and Cervantes and their trail of influence in modern literature and culture, as well as reading the works of major authors of Lebanon, Egypt, Palestine, and Morocco. Usually Offered: fall.

LIT-367 Topics in World Literature Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in World Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics in a wide range of literature from around the world. Usually Offered: fall. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-379 Mediterranean Cinema Course Level: Undergraduate

Mediterranean Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) Offered as part of the AU Abroad Madrid and the Mediterranean program. Featuring a series of films, mostly produced in Mediterranean countries, which are a rich source for the study of inter cultural relations, this course studies the cinematic medium, not only as a data source, but as a language in itself. Different film traditions are analyzed in order to discover the type of stylistic conventions that vary from culture to culture, as well as cinema's potential for inter cultural communication. Usually Offered: fall.

LIT-381 Topics in Cultural Studies Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Cultural Studies (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics deal broadly with the intersection of aesthetics, politics, and culture, covering race, gender, sexuality, popular culture, or history. Usually Offered: fall. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-400 Creative Writing: Fiction Course Level: Undergraduate

Creative Writing: Fiction (3) A writing workshop with students reading their work aloud and commenting on one another's efforts. The instructor reserves the right to have the last word. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable once for credit. Prerequisite: LIT-107.

LIT-401 Creative Writing: Poetry Course Level: Undergraduate

Creative Writing: Poetry (3) An intensive approach to the techniques of writing verse, followed by several weeks of workshop sessions in which students' poems receive responses from the entire class. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable once for credit Prerequisite: LIT-107.

LIT-403 Creative Writing: Nonfiction Course Level: Undergraduate

Creative Writing: Nonfiction (3) An intensive workshop in which students share their memoirs and personal essays, developing techniques in point of view, dialogue, and creating scenes. Usually Offered: spring. Repeatable once for credit. Prerequisite: LIT-107.

LIT-422 Adv Studies in Contemp Lit Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Contemporary Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Advanced topics in fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction of all national traditions of the past forty years, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-622. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-434 Adv St Medieval/Early Mod Lit Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Some of the greatest art, poetry, and drama in the Western tradition flourished amidst the religious and political tumult of the Medieval and Early Modern eras. Rotating topics include medieval romance, Arthurian literature, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Renaissance drama, and Renaissance poetry, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-634. Usually Offered: fall. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-435 Adv Studies in African Am Lit Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in African American Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics on the movements, forms, and theories of African American literary and cultural expression from the Middle Passage to the present in historical context, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-635. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-440 Adv Std in 19th Century Lit Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics in British and European literature ranging from nineteenth century melodrama in different national traditions to the Victorian or Romantic novel, Victorian or Romantic poetry, French realism, French Symbolist poetry, the Romantic imagination, the politics of poetry, and the Shelley circle, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-640. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-443 Adv Std in 20th Century Lit Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Twentieth Century Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics include modernist fiction and poetry, the Harlem Renaissance, postmodernism, counterculture, experimental poetry, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-643. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-446 Advanced Studies in Film Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Film (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics include film and literature, national cinema, film genres, major filmmakers, and independent filmmakers, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-646. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-467 Adv Std in World Literature Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in World Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics in a wide range of literature from around the world, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-667. Usually Offered: fall, spring, and summer. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-479 Sr Sem in Lit: Value of Lit Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Seminar in Literature: The Value of Literature (3) This course is the first in the capstone sequence for literature majors. It addresses the following questions: Is literature separable from other forms of linguistic expression? Are there modes of interpretation and study unique to literature? Why has the assertion of literary value found expression in specifying a canon of particular works? Since art and literature are traditionally defined in terms of secondariness, either as reflection, mimesis, or as refinement, the course also addresses the issue of secondariness and marginalization in both literature and literary criticism. Usually Offered: fall.

LIT-480 Senior Project in Literature Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Project in Literature (3) This course is the second in the capstone sequence for literature majors. Students tap into their own intellectual curiosity and develop their research, analytical, and writing skills, culminating in a 25 page paper. Class meetings provide support and structure for work on the project and include faculty guest speakers and student presentations. Usually Offered: spring. Prerequisite: LIT-479.

LIT-490 Ind Study Project in Lit Course Level: Undergraduate

Independent Study Project in Literature (1-6) Permission: instructor and department chair.

LIT-491 Practical Internship in Lit Course Level: Undergraduate

Practical Internship in Literature (1-6) Practical work in writing and research for various agencies and publications, and apprentice teaching experience with private schools and diverse groups, including the Writing Center. Permission: instructor and department chair.

LIT-496 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-622 Adv Studies in Contemp Lit Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Studies in Contemporary Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Advanced topics in fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction of all national traditions of the past forty years, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-422. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-634 Adv St Medieval/Early Mod Lit Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Some of the greatest art, poetry, and drama in the Western tradition flourished amidst the religious and political tumult of the Medieval and Early Modern eras. Rotating topics include medieval romance, Arthurian literature, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Renaissance drama, and Renaissance poetry, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-434. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-635 Adv Studies in African Am Lit Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Studies in African American Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics on the movements, forms, and theories of African American literary and cultural expression from the Middle Passage to the present in historical context, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-435. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-640 Adv Std in 19th Century Lit Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics in British and European literature ranging from nineteenth century melodrama in different national traditions to the Victorian or Romantic novel, Victorian or Romantic poetry, French realism, and French Symbolist poetry, the Romantic imagination, the politics of poetry, and the Shelley circle, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-440. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-643 Adv Std in 20th Century Lit Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Studies in Twentieth Century Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics include modernist fiction and poetry, the Harlem Renaissance, postmodernism, counterculture, experimental poetry, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-443. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-646 Advanced Studies in Film Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Studies in Film (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics include film and literature, national cinema, film genres, major filmmakers, and independent filmmakers, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-446. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-652 Readings in Genre: Drama Course Level: Graduate

Reading in Genre: Drama (3) Overview of drama from all significant literary periods; special attention paid to the history and forms of the genre. Usually Offered: alternate springs.

LIT-667 Adv Std in World Literature Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Studies in World Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics in a wide range of literature from around the world, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-467. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-690 Ind Study Project in Lit Course Level: Graduate

Independent Study Project in Literature (1-6) Permission: instructor and department chair.

LIT-696 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-700 Advanced Fiction Workshop Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Fiction Workshop (3) A writing workshop with students reading their work aloud and commenting on one another's efforts. The instructor reserves the right to have the last word. Graduate students are expected to submit 12,500 words or more. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).

LIT-701 Advanced Poetry Workshop Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Poetry Workshop (3) An intensive approach to the techniques of writing verse, followed by several weeks of workshop sessions in which students' poems receive responses from the entire class. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).

LIT-704 Adv Creative Nonfiction Wrkshp Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Creative Nonfiction Workshop (3) Topics vary by section. Intensive critical workshop in writing memoirs and personal essays, emphasizing the development of the first-person voice. Usually Offered: alternate springs. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).

LIT-705 Seminar on Translation Course Level: Graduate

Seminar on Translation (3) Designed primarily for writers, this course introduces students to the international community of writers by providing approaches to and models for the translation of literary works as well as experience in translating. It is expected that students will learn about the use of their own language in the process. Fluency in another language is helpful but not required. Crosslist: LIT-405. Usually Offered: spring. Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).

LIT-710 The Art of Literary Journalism Course Level: Graduate

The Art of Literary Journalism (3) A workshop in which the craft of reviewing books, plays, movies, TV, art, and music is practiced. Clear expository writing is the aim, tied to established criteria for sound critical approaches in journalism. Usually Offered: fall. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite/Concurrent: at least 18 credit hours. Restriction: Creative Writing (MFA).

LIT-730 Teaching Composition Course Level: Graduate

Teaching Composition (3) An introduction to the field of composition studies as well as the theory and practices of teaching academic writing. Students wrestle with fundamental questions about writing and the personal, social, and cultural dimensions of literacy; explore the nature of written discourse, the composing process, and learning; and discuss issues and examine current approaches in teaching for contemporary composition classrooms. Usually Offered: fall.

LIT-731 Teaching of Writing Practicum Course Level: Graduate

Teaching of Writing Practicum (3) An internship with a Writing Studies Program instructor and ongoing study in composition studies to prepare for teaching academic writing. Usually Offered: spring. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: LIT-730.

LIT-733 Special Topics in Literature Course Level: Graduate

Special Topics in Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Focuses on thematic and theoretical approaches to literature that traverse historical periods and national boundaries. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-736 Seminar in 18th C. Literature Course Level: Graduate

Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature (3) Topics vary by section. Varies in content to cover English, European, or American literature. Usually Offered: alternate springs. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-793 Directed Research in Lit Course Level: Graduate

Directed Research in Literature (3) Students work closely with a faculty member on a scholarly article (20-35 pages) developed from a paper originally submitted for a graduate literature course, with the potential for publication in a scholarly journal. Students enhance their skills in conducting research and/or situating an idea within current scholarly dialogue in the field. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Permission: instructor.

LIT-797 Master's Thesis Seminar Course Level: Graduate

Master's Thesis Seminar (1-6) Grading: SP/UP only.