You are here: Course Descriptions

LITERATURE

LIT-446 Advanced Studies in Film Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Film (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics include film and literature, national cinema, film genres, major filmmakers, and independent filmmakers, with emphasis on research. Crosslist: LIT-646. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

LIT-446-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Race and Film
Race and Film (3) This course considers the way that issues of race have shaped the history of American cinema. It is concerned in large part with the representations of African Americans (and American Indians) as they have changed over time, as well as with the ways in which the work of nonwhite directors, actors, and writers has affected those representations. Topics covered include the relation between race and visibility; the politics of the Western; melodrama and the tragic mulatto; Blaxploitation; and the relationship of cinematic images to social prejudices. Meets with LIT-646 001.
LIT-446-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Television Studies
Television Studies (3) The boob tube. The idiot box. Television has been blamed for all sorts of ills in society, along with the death of cinema, literature, and civilized society in general, and yet it does not take close examination to find that television also offers us some of the richest forms of contemporary narrative. The post-World War II rise of television as a creative medium changed audiovisual expression significantly: nightly news, the sitcom, the variety show, the game show, all in the comfort of your living room. Television clearly derives from film (the 1.25:1 aspect ratio of the original television screens obviously mimicked the academy ratio used in cinema at the time) and so does the study of the medium. There are important differences--narrative, ideological and theoretical--that make television a unique concept to explore. Meets with LIT-646 002.
LIT-446-001
Term: Spring 2019 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Alfred Hitchcock in Context
Alfred Hitchcock in Context (3) This course traces the development of Alfred Hitchcock's career in the cinema from his early work in silent films in the 1920s to his last films in the 1960s. In addition to screenings of Hitchcock films and readings in the history, theory, and aesthetics of cinema, the class discusses related film genres and modes that influenced or affected his work, including silent era dramas, expressionist films, examples of film noir and melodrama, B-movies, and thrillers. Meets with LIT-646 001.