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PHILOSOPHY

PHIL-396 Selected Topics:Non-Recurring Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6) Topics vary by section. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

PHIL-396-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Practicum in Ethics
Practicum in Ethics (3) This course deepens students' understanding of ethical theories, facilitates the development of leadership skills, and provides a robust opportunity for experiential learning. It also supports students in serving as Assistant Coaches for the DC Area High School Ethics Bowl. The course is composed of both class sessions on campus and weekly meetings with the Ethics Bowl teams at area high schools.
PHIL-396-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Implicit Bias
Implicit Bias: (In)Visible Oppression (3) In the last several decades, philosophers, psychologists and social scientists have found that many people who verbally report commitments of equality nevertheless make negative associations with diverse social groups. This interdisciplinary course explores psychological research on the existence and nature of implicit biases, investigates the philosophical implications of implicit bias, and evaluates various strategies for dealing with implicit bias with the aim of gaining insight into how to make progress toward social justice in an age of implicit, and oftentimes invisible, oppression. Meets with PSYC-396 001.
PHIL-396-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Environmental Ethics
Environmental Ethics (3) Environmental dangers call into question not simply political, economic, and technological capabilities, but also the moral quality of our lives. They have to do with how we treat other people and the nonhuman world. As such, they raise fundamental questions of right and wrong, how we can best live, who we are as a species, and humanity's place in the wider network of life. This course explores the ethical quandaries facing humanity at this unique moment of environmental intensification and exposes students to the need for and intellectual challenges of seeking moral clarity at a time of cascading environmental degradation.