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PHILOSOPHY

PHIL-485 Selected Topics in Philosophy Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics including medical ethics, philosophy of language, advanced philosophical argumentation, philosophy of reason and passion, bio-ethics, and post-modernism. Crosslist: Usually PHIL-685. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: PHIL-105.

PHIL-485-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Disability Law and Ethics
Disability Law and Ethics (3) Societal conceptions of disability have and continue to pose significant ethical challenges. This course examines these challenges and the evolution of disability rights law often made in response. Students explore law and ethics as different ways of determining the ultimate value of disability in our society over time. Meets with HLTH-496 001 HLTH-696 001 PHIL-685 001.
PHIL-485-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Nihilism
Nihilism (3) Examines the cultural and philosophical meaning of nihilism through the work of nineteenth and twentieth century thinkers, e.g., Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Zweig, Scheler, and Heidegger. The course attends especially to nihilism as a reply to scientism, the belief that science can and ought to explain everything. Meets with PHIL-685 002.
PHIL-485-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Phenomenology and Social World
Phenomenology and Social World (3) This course is a rigorous inquiry into phenomenology and the social world. Through a close reading of the works of Husserl, Heidegger, Stein, Scheler, Sartre, Beauvoir, and Ahmed, the course engages the core themes of lived-experience, the Other, sociality, historical understanding, feminism and embodiment. Meets with PHIL-685 001.
PHIL-485-002
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Prison & Abolitionist Imagintn
Prisons and the Abolitionist Imagination (3) This course equips students to consider and to create real alternatives to the present system of mass incarceration. Drawing on anthropological and philosophical perspectives, this course addresses the historical and theoretical foundations of the modern prison, specifically marking its embeddedness in hierarchical social systems (such as race, gender, class, and disability), before considering the comparative strategies of prison reform, resistance, and abolition. Throughout the seminar, and in dialogue with historical abolitionist projects, students explore the nature of the abolitionist imagination, as well as the means by which it may be cultivated. This course emphasizes history, culture, and lived reality alongside critical argumentation and conceptual analysis to enhance students' capacity for engaged thinking. Meets with ANTH-496 001 ANTH-696 001 PHIL-685 002.
PHIL-485-003
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Theories in Marriage Abolition
Theories in Marriage Abolition (3) Examines the contemporary debate between liberal feminists advocating for marital abolition and marital reform. Students critically interrogate the state's role in supporting romantic and familial relationships, gender and sexual identities, and morality. The course foregrounds a critical race analysis of the liberal political project. Meets with PHIL-685 003 WGSS-496 004 WGSS-696 004.