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INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-619
Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including international economic policy coordination, emerging capital markets, international environmental policy, political risk analysis, international relations of Japan, preventive diplomacy, United States and Cuba, and nonviolence. Usually offered every term.

SIS-619
001
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Conflict and Development

An examination of the way in which development processes, strategies, and policies increase or decrease local, national, and international conflicts, as well as the ways in which conflicts at all levels condition development choices.

SIS-619
002
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

International Security in Asia

This course introduces students to alternative ways of looking at Asia's emerging security order using different theories and perspectives on international relations. It also informs students with a comprehensive background in Asian security problems and challenges including the rise of China, Japan, and India, territorial disputes in South and East China Sea, energy and maritime security issues, arms races, intervention, domestic strife and democratization, the role of the United States in Asian security and its military presence and bilateral alliances in the region, and the security architecture of Asia for the twenty-first century.

SIS-619
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

History of Global Politics

This course provides historical context on change and continuity in the global political system. It examines the rise, fall, and evolution of the political units that have comprised the system, including city-states, empires, and socio-cultural political units such as world religions as well as the modern nation-state and addresses how each of these different forms of political units have affected the practice of global politics across the centuries. The course compares parallel sub-global systems of politics common before the contemporary era of interconnected global politics, particularly politics within the European state system to those in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Finally, the course takes a historical perspective on change and continuity in the variety of actors and organizing structures in global politics to assess how conceptions of global society, norms, and values as well as power and self-interest have shaped peace, conflict, prosperity, and development across history.

SIS-619
004
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Insurgency and Counterinsurgency

In an age of globalization but unequal distribution of economic resources and political power, insurgencies pose one of the greatest challenges to the established order, whether that order is a democracy, monarchy, dictatorship or theocracy. This course analyzes the historical roots of insurgencies and counterinsurgencies, beginning with the Roman Empire, and assesses the causes, conduct, and consequences of these actions, with an emphasis on applications since World War II. Though military aspects are included, the principal focus is on the political, economic, and social forces that have informed and directed insurgents and those who oppose them. Through an understanding of the history of this complex and often misinterpreted field, students seek to define the issues these movements pose and create a framework to assess the factors that precede their rise and shape their outcome.

SIS-619
007
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Global International Relations Theory

This foundation course approaches international relations theory with an interdisciplinary perspective and presents the major paradigms existing in the field. It sets normative and analytical definitions of priorities and goals and establishes the boundaries of the field. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
008
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Political Risk Analysis

Political risk analysis techniques allow practitioners to gauge the political conditions that would be beneficial or harmful to investment and other activities. This methodology course covers approaches to political risk analysis and applications.

SIS-619
010
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Refugees, Migration, and Trafficking

Few issues pose as significant a challenge to states as international migration does, affecting nearly all critical aspects of governance. The myriad ways that immigration and refugee flows affect state interests, both material and idealistic, creates highly contentious politics where domestic interests clash and defining a national interest is an elusive quest for the state. This course offers students a broad overview of migration and refugee dynamics, and identifies those aspects most challenging to state governance. This includes understanding the factors that generate migration and refugee flows, as well as the politics they generate, both international and domestic. The course examines the security implications (broadly defined) of global migration and refugee flows, including defense, homeland security, and economic and societal dimensions. It also considers carefully the human rights implications of these dynamics. The course also examines policy development over the past half-century in a comparative perspective with an eye towards identifying new challenges and generating questions for future research.

SIS-619
011
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Governance, Development and Corruption

This course explores the scope of corruption around the world. It considers sources and effects of these practices, and the practical possibilities for controlling or reducing corruption, especially in African contexts.

SIS-619
012
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

History of Global Politics

This course provides historical context on change and continuity in the global political system. It examines the rise, fall, and evolution of the political units that have comprised the system, including city-states, empires, and socio-cultural political units such as world religions as well as the modern nation-state and addresses how each of these different forms of political units have affected the practice of global politics across the centuries. The course compares parallel sub-global systems of politics common before the contemporary era of interconnected global politics, particularly politics within the European state system to those in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Finally, the course takes a historical perspective on change and continuity in the variety of actors and organizing structures in global politics to assess how conceptions of global society, norms, and values as well as power and self-interest have shaped peace, conflict, prosperity, and development across history. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
013
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Global International Relations Theory

This foundation course approaches international relations theory with an interdisciplinary perspective and presents the major paradigms existing in the field. It sets normative and analytical definitions of priorities and goals and establishes the boundaries of the field. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
015
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Energy and Security in Eurasia

This course explores an important driver of international relations and national security, the connection between energy and security. Europe is a large and growing energy market, increasingly depending on imported resources. The course provides a strategic overview of European energy security, the current and potential future role for Eurasian energy supplies, as well as different scenarios for long-term energy solutions.

SIS-619
016
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Economics of Violence and Peace

This course examines political economic issues concerning war and peace, including civil war, terrorism, and insurgency. Taking a broad view which emphasizes the interaction between economic and non-economic factors, including religion and culture, it discusses economic causes of wars, focusing on economic grievances, resources, environmental problems, and poverty; economic consequences of wars; and economic measures for conflict prevention and resolution, as well as post-conflict reconstruction.

SIS-619
018
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Peacebuilding in Divided Society

This course explores various peacebuilding approaches that can be utilized in multi-ethnic and divided societies. It focuses on the three possible levels of intervention (grassroots, middle out and top down) often implemented by peacemakers in their attempts to bring change to the dynamics of deeply rooted conflict societies. As a primary case study for this course, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is critically reviewed and examined. Multiple dimensions of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, as well as the relationship between Palestinians and Jews within Israel, are investigated.

SIS-619
019
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

US-Iran Conflict and Reconciliation

This course provides a basis for understanding the political, economic, and security dimensions of Iran's role in regional politics, the conflict in the U.S.-Iran relations, and reconciliation as an important factor and determinant of stability in the Middle East. Organized along historical and thematic lines from Iran being a front-line state during the Cold War to it becoming the home of an Islamic revolution, the course focuses on the issues of culture and politics, thought and practice, to elucidate aspects of tension and conflict between the U.S. and Iran and its implication for the region. Students study conflict resolution theories and explore debates in the field as applicable to the U.S.-Iran relations and look at new alternatives for dialogue and opportunities for negotiation in the process of reconciliation in a comparative historical perspective. Course includes issues of reform and radicalism, Islam as a political force, Iran's role in regional politics, and the search for new alternatives in cultural engagement and diplomacy in resolving conflict.

SIS-619
021
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Human Security

This course examines developments in and ways of thinking about security since the end of the bi-polar world order. The course considers ways of thinking about security other than through the national security framework; works towards an understanding of non-military threats to human life, communities, societies, and cultures; examines the intersection of globalism and new forms of security provision; examines the impact of organized crime; assesses the scope and consequences of light weapons proliferation, especially for developing countries; and analyzes forms of involvement in wars. Usually offered every term.

SIS-619
023
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Global Political Economy

This course is concerned with the scope of political economy. The focus is on the origins of the modern global political economy and its institutional structure. It examines contemporary issues in political economy, using the division of labor as an organizing concept, and explores the prospects for global restructuring at the turn of the century.

SIS-619
024
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Conflict in Africa

This course is a historical and analytical overview of conflict in Africa. The course begins with conflict in pre-colonial Africa and the advent of colonialism. The bulk of the course is concerned with an exploration of theories regarding the causes of conflict in Africa, ranging from the economic and social impact of colonialism, political culture, ethnic divisions, greed and grievance, etc. Recent major conflicts in Africa are analyzed with respect to these theories. Finally, possibilities for peace in Africa are addressed.

SIS-619
D01
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Great Powers Politics: Diplomacy, Order, and War

This course helps students to unpack and discover the critical role that great power politics plays in ordering international politics. The course is broadly divided into four sections. First, the course specifies the concept of great powers, with a focus on the sources and nature of their political influence; then the course focuses on the manner in which great powers interact with one another and the institutions used to mediate their relationships. In the third section, students are introduced to concrete examples of great power order such as the Concert of Europe, the League of Nations, and the UN. Finally, how great power discord comes about and the consequences of this discord for international security is discussed.

SIS-619
009
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Weak States and War

In recent years there has been a growing realization of the importance of state building and the dangers associated with state failure. But why do some states manage to build a strong and cohesive polity while others fail to do so? This course uses a combination of theory with historical and current case studies to examine the effects of war on the process of state building, as well as state weakness as a source of international conflicts.

SIS-619
N02L
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

The Making of US Foreign Policy: Institutions and Processes

This course introduces students to the institutions and processes involved in making US foreign, defense and intelligence policy. The course provides a brief overview of the foreign and national security challenges facing the United States and focuses on the institutions, decision-making processes and politics of US foreign and national security policy-making. It covers the State and Defense departments, the intelligence community, the White House, interagency processes, the Congress, and outside participants in the policy process.

SIS-619
028
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Politics of International Criminal Law

This course examines the political dynamics that shape the formation, design, and operation of international criminal courts. Beginning with the Nuremberg tribunal following World War II, the course explores the intersection between principles of justice and the practice of power politics. In addition to the post-WWII tribunals, the course covers the ad-hoc international tribunals established for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, the hybrid courts created for situations such as Sierra Leone and Cambodia, and the International Criminal Court (ICC). The course does not deal with the jurisprudence of trial processes, but rather, on the politics that surround the creation and function of these international legal institutions.

SIS-619
029
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Managing International Organizations: Governance, Diplomacy, andSecurity

International organizations such as the IMF, OECD, World Bank OSCE, UN, G-20, face a wide range of organizational challenges from uncertainty over their mission, purpose, architecture and priorities to questions about their relevance, efficacy and leadership. This course helps students develop the practical management and diplomatic skills necessary to address these challenges. It also explores the security, governance and development issues of this century and how to cultivate public and financial support to meet these issues. It challenges students to ask what works and what is needed to create the political will to energize these organizations and adapt to changes that are taking place at warp speed and outside the traditional structure of the nation state.

SIS-619
031
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Business Diplomacy

It's not business as usual for twenty first century leaders. Operating in an environment of constant change where the coins of the realm are transparency and trust, business leaders must engage with their stakeholders in order to achieve organizational goals. Stakeholder engagement, reputation management, issue and crisis management, advocacy, and corporate social responsibility are the leadership competencies required to manage people and processes across borders in culturally diverse contexts. This course gives students an understanding of the key elements of an integrated public affairs function and its role in achieving the strategic objectives. For students of international relations and international business, whether they plan a future in business, government, or NGO, the course offers a fresh perspective and a practical approach to understanding real-world problems and managing the environment of a global organization.

SIS-619
032
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Understanding Conflict: Syria and Iraq

This course discusses the historical, political, social, and identity based foundations for the current conflicts in Syria and Iraq. It analyzes the main groups involved in these conflicts and their grievances. It also analyzes the rise of radical groups, such as ISIS, and the regional consequences of such radicalism. Finally, the course reviews regional and international attempts aiming at the peaceful resolution of the conflicts, and avenues for constructive U.S. engagement.

SIS-619
033
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Adaptation Under Fire

This course examines the role of adaptation in war. It is intended to help graduate students understand the difficulties of accurately forecasting the nature of future conflicts, and how militaries must rapidly adjust to unexpected circumstances. The course highlights the challenges confronting militaries that enter conflicts with unproven theories and then must adjust those approaches to the painful realities of a new battlefield, or fail. Students study eight modern wars to examine how militaries adapted their doctrine, use of technology and leadership in order to become more effective. The course also highlights the viewpoints and experiences of individual service members in combat in dealing with fear and stress.

SIS-619
034
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Mediation in a Turbulent World

This course introduces students to mediation in local, national, regional and international conflicts, situates mediation in the larger peacebuilding context and examines benefits and challenges to mediation that arise from the contemporary conflict environment, including - on the challenges side - major power retrenchment, dissension in the UN Security Council, the rise of violent non-state actors and - on the more positive side - the growing engagement of regional organizations and civil society groups in third-party peacemaking as well as increasing interest in mediated settlements in local, national and regional conflicts around the world. The course connects theory to practice through discussion, research, small-group work, case study review of real events, and simulations.

SIS-619
035
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Transnational Organized Crime

Transnational criminals and terrorists interact particularly in conflict regions and regions of frozen conflict. Terrorists in many regions of the world depend on organized crime to finance their activities and provide them logistical support. This course examines the diverse forms of interaction of transnational crime and corruption, with the relationship of these different groups to the state a central part of the analysis. The class looks at the security, human rights, and social consequences of this interaction.

SIS-619
036
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Democratization and Political Change in the Middle East

This course examines both various aspects of the recent push for democratization in the Middle East and the formidable obstacles and setbacks with which it has been faced. In pursuing its inquiry, the course considers the Middle East's authoritarian structures and their resilience; shifting societal norms and demographics; emerging social movements including women and youth movements; the role of moderate Islamist politics and its relationship with secular political forces; the rise of radical Islamist politics and violence in Iraq, Syria and Libya; and the role of Western hegemony in the region. The course looks extensively at the roots, and trajectories of the Arab Uprisings of 2011 and Green Movement protests in Iran which preceded them, for example by juxtaposing the politics of the Egyptian and Tunisian democratic transitions and the diverging paths towards renewed authoritarianism and significant democratic gains each has taken. Through the course students gain considerable insight into the current predicament and prospects for long-term political change in select Middle Eastern countries and the region as a whole.

SIS-619
037T
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Seminar in International Affairs

This course introduces students to, establishes a theoretical foundation of knowledge in, and provides exposure to experts in the main fields of concentration available in the graduate programs of the School of International Service: international politics, international law and organizations, international peace and conflict resolution, comparative and regional studies, international communication, international economic relations, international development, global environmental politics, and U.S. foreign policy. The course improves students' understanding of these fields of study through experiential education and active learning; immerses students in both the theory and practice of these areas through meetings with experts and site visits to relevant agencies and organizations; explores relevant career opportunities and prepares students to pursue professional careers in these fields; and develops academic and professional skills relevant to these subject areas. Prerequisite: admission to the Graduate Gateway Program and permission of department.

SIS-619
N03L
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

The Making of US Foreign Policy: Institutions and Processes

This course introduces students to the institutions and processes involved in making US foreign, defense and intelligence policy. The course provides a brief overview of the foreign and national security challenges facing the United States and focuses on the institutions, decision-making processes and politics of US foreign and national security policy-making. It covers the State and Defense departments, the intelligence community, the White House, interagency processes, the Congress, and outside participants in the policy process.

SIS-619
038OL
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Executive Leadership

In an interactive class, students discuss decision making, ethical leadership, strategic communication, teamwork, emotional intelligence, leading multi-cultural workforces, and change and crisis management. Students have an opportunity to analyze who they are as a leader, who they want to be as a leader, and how others perceive their leadership skills to gain insight on their leadership strengths, challenges that may be impeding their effectiveness, and ways of creating leadership impact. Open only to MIS students.

SIS-619
039OL
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Executive Leadership

In an interactive class, students discuss decision making, ethical leadership, strategic communication, teamwork, emotional intelligence, leading multi-cultural workforces, and change and crisis management. Students have an opportunity to analyze who they are as a leader, who they want to be as a leader, and how others perceive their leadership skills to gain insight on their leadership strengths, challenges that may be impeding their effectiveness, and ways of creating leadership impact. Open only to MIS students.

SIS-619
040OL
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Executive Leadership

In an interactive class, students discuss decision making, ethical leadership, strategic communication, teamwork, emotional intelligence, leading multi-cultural workforces, and change and crisis management. Students have an opportunity to analyze who they are as a leader, who they want to be as a leader, and how others perceive their leadership skills to gain insight on their leadership strengths, challenges that may be impeding their effectiveness, and ways of creating leadership impact. Open only to MIS online program students. Meets with SIS-619-038OL.

SIS-619
041OL
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Executive Leadership

In an interactive class, students discuss decision making, ethical leadership, strategic communication, teamwork, emotional intelligence, leading multi-cultural workforces, and change and crisis management. Students have an opportunity to analyze who they are as a leader, who they want to be as a leader, and how others perceive their leadership skills to gain insight on their leadership strengths, challenges that may be impeding their effectiveness, and ways of creating leadership impact. Open only to MIS online program students. Meets with SIS-619-039OL.