You are here: Course Descriptions

INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-619 Special Studies in Int'l Pol Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics including international economic policy coordination, emerging capital markets, international environmental policy, political risk analysis, international relations of Japan, preventive diplomacy, United States and Cuba, and nonviolence. Usually Offered: fall, spring, and summer. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

SIS-619-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: State-Building
State-Building (3) This course examines the distinctive challenges of state-building in our time, and efforts by occupying powers, international organizations, separatist movements, and historical empires to construct stable governance. After exploring some historical cases of West European state-building, the course focuses primarily on contemporary cases in Eurasia, particularly on Russia and Ukraine. The primary assignment for the course is a policy paper or research paper, allowing deep engagement with an empirical topic of each student's choice.
SIS-619-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Disputes & Diplmcy: East Asia
Disputes and Diplomacy: Korea, Japan, and China (3) This course examines key territorial and historical disputes involving South Korea, Japan, and China. The focus is to think critically about the ongoing disputes in terms of identity, domestic politics, and regional security dynamics, as the course investigates these countries' past and current diplomatic efforts to resolve them. The topics include but are not limited to the disputes over the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands, the Dokdo/Takeshima islets, the so-called comfort women, the South China Sea, and the controversy over Koguryo/Gaogouli.
SIS-619-004
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: History of Global Politics
History of Global Politics (3) This course provides historical context on change and continuity in the global political system. It examines the rise, fall, and evolution of the political units that have comprised the system, including city-states, empires, and socio-cultural political units such as world religions as well as the modern nation-state and addresses how each of these different forms of political units have affected the practice of global politics across the centuries. The course compares parallel sub-global systems of politics common before the contemporary era of interconnected global politics, particularly politics within the European state system to those in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Finally, the course takes a historical perspective on change and continuity in the variety of actors and organizing structures in global politics to assess how conceptions of global society, norms, and values as well as power and self-interest have shaped peace, conflict, prosperity, and development across history.
SIS-619-005
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: History of Global Politics
History of Global Politics (3) This course provides historical context on change and continuity in the global political system. It examines the rise, fall, and evolution of the political units that have comprised the system, including city-states, empires, and socio-cultural political units such as world religions as well as the modern nation-state and addresses how each of these different forms of political units have affected the practice of global politics across the centuries. The course compares parallel sub-global systems of politics common before the contemporary era of interconnected global politics, particularly politics within the European state system to those in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Finally, the course takes a historical perspective on change and continuity in the variety of actors and organizing structures in global politics to assess how conceptions of global society, norms, and values as well as power and self-interest have shaped peace, conflict, prosperity, and development across history.
SIS-619-006
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Global Int'l Relations Theory
Global International Relations Theory (3) This foundation course approaches international relations theory with an interdisciplinary perspective and presents the major paradigms existing in the field. It sets normative and analytical definitions of priorities and goals and establishes the boundaries of the field.
SIS-619-007
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Global Int'l Relations Theory
Global International Relations Theory (3) This foundation course approaches international relations theory with an interdisciplinary perspective and presents the major paradigms existing in the field. It sets normative and analytical definitions of priorities and goals and establishes the boundaries of the field.
SIS-619-009
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Insurgency & Counterinsurgency
Insurgency and Counterinsurgency (3) In an age of globalization but unequal distribution of economic resources and political power, insurgencies pose one of the greatest challenges to the established order, whether that order is a democracy, monarchy, dictatorship, or theocracy. This course analyzes the historical roots of insurgencies and counterinsurgencies, beginning with the Roman Empire, and assesses the causes, conduct, and consequences of these actions, with an emphasis on applications since World War II. Though military aspects are included, the principal focus is on the political, economic, and social forces that have informed and directed insurgents and those who oppose them. Through an understanding of the history of this complex and often misinterpreted field, students seek to define the issues these movements pose and create a framework to assess the factors that precede their rise and shape their outcome.
SIS-619-010
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Refugees, Migration & Traffick
Refugees, Migration, and Trafficking (3) Few issues pose as significant a challenge to states as international migration does, affecting nearly all critical aspects of governance. The myriad ways that immigration and refugee flows affect state interests, both material and idealistic, creates highly contentious politics where domestic interests clash and defining a national interest is an elusive quest for the state. This course offers students a broad overview of migration and refugee dynamics, and identifies those aspects most challenging to state governance. This includes understanding the factors that generate migration and refugee flows, as well as the politics they generate, both international and domestic. The course examines the security implications (broadly defined) of global migration and refugee flows, including defense, homeland security, and economic and societal dimensions. It also considers carefully the human rights implications of these dynamics. The course also examines policy development over the past half-century in a comparative perspective with an eye towards identifying new challenges and generating questions for future research.
SIS-619-011
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Regional Govern in Asia/Europe
Regional Governance in Asia and Europe: ASEAN and the EU (3) This course compares and contrasts the evolution and nature of regional governance in Asia and Europe as manifested by the Association of Southeast Asia Nations (ASEAN) and the European Union (EU). From their inception, both ASEAN and the EU shared striking commonalities and differences in their respective modalities as regional organizations. Both have had notable success in safeguarding regional stability and preventing conflicts among member states and advancing regional growth through economic cooperation and integration. However, the ASEAN and EU regional modalities has been shaped by distinctive historical, political, socio-cultural, economic, and geo-strategic contexts in post-World War Two Europe and Southeast Asia. Despite EU's active encouragement of ASEAN to model itself on the EU, Asia's different historical contexts, highly diverse cultural landscapes and widely different political and economic systems have worked against the EU modality taking root in Asia.
SIS-619-012
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Corruption, Dirty Money & Dev
Corruption, Dirty Money, and Development (3) Corruption is a fact of life for most of the world's people. For the world's poorest, the so-called "bottom billion," corruption has devastating consequences on the quality of their lives: their health care, education, environment, and physical security. In addition, it is increasingly recognized that corruption is a major driver of violence and ethnic conflict, notably in countries afflicted by the resource curse. This course addresses the varied causes and impacts of corruption. It looks at how kleptocracies are formed and sustained, and how some governments are in effect criminal organizations masquerading as states. It also explores the role of "dirty money" that is, money that has been obtained through corrupt acts and laundered with the support of western banks and financial institutions, in promoting corruption and capital flight, thereby making stolen assets more difficult to detect, investigate, and return to a country's people. Finally, the course assesses efforts by civil society, development and donor agencies, and international financial institutions such as the World Bank to reduce corruption.
SIS-619-013
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Int'l Law & the Global Order
International Law and the Global Order (3) This course focuses on the role of international law in interstate relations and global order; analyzes the contribution of different international institutions in making of international law; and examines the effectiveness of international law in maintaining order in important areas of global affairs with emphasis on cases, treaties, and other documents.
SIS-619-014
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Conflict/Peacebldng in Africa
Conflict and Peacebuilding in Africa (3) This course is a historical and analytical overview of conflict and peacemaking in Africa. It examines key issues, cases, and theories that have shaped approaches to the study of drivers of conflict and peace systems in Africa. The course helps students delve deeper into the discourse on the causes of violent conflict and challenge of constructing appropriate frameworks for creating and sustaining peace on the African continent. Specific issues covered include the conflict and peace effects of Africa's colonial legacy, ethnopolitical group identity and competition, uneven post colonial state-building projects and inadequate state capacity, the role of external actors and partners, the impact of economic factors, environmental scarcity, and gender dimensions of conflict and peacemaking on the continent. The course also assesses, through case studies, the efficacy of various peacemaking tools and probe the utility of new ideas for building sustainable peace in Africa.
SIS-619-015
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Economics of Violence & Peace
Economics of Violence and Peace (3) This course examines political economic issues concerning war and peace, including civil war, terrorism, and insurgency. Taking a broad view, which emphasizes the interaction between economic and non-economic factors, including religion and culture, it discusses economic causes of wars, focusing on economic grievances, resources, environmental problems, and poverty; economic consequences of wars; and economic measures for conflict prevention and resolution, as well as post-conflict reconstruction.
SIS-619-016
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Mediation in a Turbulent World
Mediation in a Turbulent World (3) This course introduces students to mediation in local, national, regional and international conflicts, situates mediation in the larger peacebuilding context and examines benefits and challenges to mediation that arise from the contemporary conflict environment, including, on the challenges side, major power retrenchment, dissension in the UN Security Council, the rise of violent non-state actors and, on the more positive side, the growing engagement of regional organizations and civil society groups in third-party peacemaking, as well as increasing interest in mediated settlements in local, national, and regional conflicts around the world. The course connects theory to practice through discussion, research, small-group work, case study review of real events, and simulations.
SIS-619-018
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Peacebuilding in Divided Soc
Peacebuilding in Divided Society (3) This course explores various peacebuilding approaches that can be utilized in multi-ethnic and divided societies. It focuses on the three possible levels of intervention (grassroots, middle out and top down) often implemented by peacemakers in their attempts to bring change to the dynamics of deeply rooted conflict societies. As a primary case study for this course, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is critically reviewed and examined. Multiple dimensions of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, as well as the relationship between Palestinians and Jews within Israel, are investigated.
SIS-619-019
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Human Rights: Roosevelts-Trump
Human Rights and U.S. Foreign Policy: From the Roosevelts to Trump (3) Since Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt championed human rights in the 1940s, United States attention to human rights abuses has risen and waned. This course explores how concern for human rights has influenced United States foreign policy and how the geopolitical struggle of the Cold War and domestic politics shaped American concern for human rights internationally. It examines the challenges of combating terrorism and respecting human rights more recently, as well as contemporary struggles to balance morality and adherence to "American values" with the preservation of national security. The assigned readings and class discussions help students define human rights and assess the American commitment to protect those rights. Finally, students consider what Trump's America First policy means for human rights. To this end, they read important accounts by historians, political scientists, journalists, and human rights activists. The course promotes critical, analytical thinking about United States human rights policy and encourages students to develop their own interpretation of the evolution and significance of the American commitment to human rights in the postwar years.
SIS-619-020
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Empire: Past and Present
Empire: Past and Present (3) Having governed the world for millennia, the empire is still alive. This seminar examines historic and contemporary empires such as America, Britain, China, Japan, Rome, and Russia, with a focus on empires in Asia. It covers essential components of empire building, including: military expansion, indirect rule, unequal exchange, ideological hegemony, colonial policies, and ruling strategies. Even though most empires perished in the twentieth century, their political, economic, and cultural legacies persist in the post-colonial period. The course therefore provides empire as a useful perspective for understanding contemporary regional and global powers, which inherit, incorporate, and reinvent imperial institutions and strategies.
SIS-619-022
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: War & Peace in the Middle East
War and Peace in the Middle East (3) To imagine peace in the Middle East, we must first understand the causes of conflict in Syria and Iraq, Palestine, and Yemen. This course explains these conflicts by beginning at their deepest roots: the discovery of oil fields and the collapse of the Ottoman Empire a century ago. Students gain new insight into how the Middle East became a node of global conflict in the twentieth century, as well as a solid grasp of causes and solutions of today's wars.
SIS-619-023
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: US-Iran Conf & Reconciliation
U.S.-Iran Conflict and Reconciliation (3) This course provides a basis for understanding the political, economic, and security dimensions of Iran's role in regional politics, the conflict in the U.S.-Iran relations, and reconciliation as an important factor and determinant of stability in the Middle East. Organized along historical and thematic lines from Iran being a front-line state during the Cold War to it becoming the home of an Islamic revolution, the course focuses on the issues of culture and politics, thought and practice, to elucidate aspects of tension and conflict between the U.S. and Iran and its implication for the region. Students study conflict resolution theories and explore debates in the field as applicable to the U.S.-Iran relations and look at new alternatives for dialogue and opportunities for negotiation in the process of reconciliation in a comparative historical perspective. Course includes issues of reform and radicalism, Islam as a political force, Iran's role in regional politics, and the search for new alternatives in cultural engagement and diplomacy in resolving conflict.
SIS-619-024
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Int'l Law & the Global Order
International Law and the Global Order (3) This course focuses on the role of international law in interstate relations and global order; analyzes the contribution of different international institutions in making of international law; and examines the effectiveness of international law in maintaining order in important areas of global affairs with emphasis on cases, treaties, and other documents.
SIS-619-025
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Dialogue: Approaches & Applic
Dialogue: Approaches and Applications (3) This course explores different theories and approaches to dialogue as a conflict transformation framework. It focuses on various types of identity-based conflict and the use of dialogue approaches and tools to transform and change the dynamics of ethnic, religious, and cultural conflicts. Interfaith, interethnic, and intercultural dialogue processes and case studies are explored and examined, especially their design, process, and possible impact.
SIS-619-001
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Great Powers Politics
Great Powers Politics (3) This course helps students to unpack and discover the critical role that great power politics plays in ordering international politics. The course is broadly divided into four sections. First, the course specifies the concept of great powers, with a focus on the sources and nature of their political influence; then the course focuses on the manner in which great powers interact with one another and the institutions used to mediate their relationships. In the third section, students are introduced to concrete examples of great power order such as the Concert of Europe, the League of Nations, and the UN. In the final section, the course discusses how great power discord comes about and the consequences of this discord for international security.
SIS-619-002
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: New Frontiers in Peacebuilding
New Frontiers in Peacebuilding (3) This course acquaints students with lead edge developments in peace and conflict resolution. Topics covered include neuroscience and peace; technology, social media, and peace; peace through commerce; complex systems dynamics and peacebuilding effectiveness; local agency and hybridity; and arts-based peacebuilding. The highly-interactive course includes professional skills building and presentations by experienced practitioners.
SIS-619-003
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Media & For Pol in Trump Era
Instructional Method: Online. Media and Foreign Policy in the Trump Era (3) The 21st century is simultaneously characterized by disruptive changes in new media and digital information technologies as well as disruptive shifts in foreign policies of nation states in an increasingly unstable international system. This course considers the roles social media and news media play in influencing new directions in foreign policy. This course examines rapid transformations in the way the media cover and report the world since the election of President Trump, the explosive effects in the digital sphere, and their combined interactions with the shaping and design of evolving forms of engagement and disengagement in foreign policy.
SIS-619-004
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: US Rel with Israel/Palestine
US Relations with Israel and Palestine (3) This course explores the evolution of U.S. relations with both Israel and Palestine, from the establishment of the Jewish state in 1948 to the present day. Along the way, the course examines key milestones in America's policy toward Israel/Palestine, from President Truman's controversial decision to buck the U.S. foreign policy establishment and formally recognize the state of Israel to the U.S. role in Israeli-Palestinian peacemaking. The course analyzes throughout how a combination of sentimental, domestic political, and strategic factors have led to the formation of a wholly unique bilateral relationship between the U.S. and Israel characterized at once by both tight bonds and inherent tensions. At the same time, the course analyzes the complicated, uneven relationship between the United States and the Palestinians, including its tepid support for the Palestinian Authority in the West Bank and opposition to Hamas' militant approach toward Israel in the Gaza Strip.
SIS-619-005
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Great Powers Politics
Great Powers Politics (3) This course helps students to unpack and discover the critical role that great power politics plays in ordering international politics. The course is broadly divided into four sections. First, the course specifies the concept of great powers, with a focus on the sources and nature of their political influence; then the course focuses on the manner in which great powers interact with one another and the institutions used to mediate their relationships. In the third section, students are introduced to concrete examples of great power order such as the Concert of Europe, the League of Nations, and the UN. In the final section, the course discusses how great power discord comes about and the consequences of this discord for international security.
SIS-619-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Bridging the Great Divide
Instructional Method: Online. Bridging the Great Divide (3) No two religions are closer together than Judaism and Islam, and yet ironically, no two religions are further apart. This innovative course creates an interfaith dialogue necessary for understanding critical issues in today's world. It explores the history, culture, and theology of Muslims and Jews, reflecting both on similarities and differences, as well as the major challenges. Assisted by leading scholars in the United States and Europe, the course also offers strategies for building bridges between the communities and thus for bridging the political divide in world affairs. Meets with SISU-496 001.
SIS-619-002
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Dem Decay & Authoritarianism
Democratic Decay and Authoritarianism in the West (3) It is often assumed that once a country achieves a certain level of economic and political development, absent a cataclysmic event, democratic consolidation is permanent. However, recent trends in American and European politics call this into question. This course looks at the causes and consequences of the erosion of democracy, paying particular attention to both warning signs and effective resistance efforts.
SIS-619-005
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Nationalism and Identity
Nationalism and Identity (3) This course explores the sources of our most basic and powerful feelings of political loyalty: our ideas about who we are, who has the right to rule over us, who we are willing to kill and for whom we are willing to die. After exploring what nationalism is, why it is so powerful, and some of the different explanations of nationalism and identity-formation, the class looks at the role of nationalism and identity in a wide range of political phenomena: insurgency and resistance to occupation, the collapse of multi-ethnic states and empires, civil and international wars, and distinctive patterns of voting and violence.
SIS-619-006
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: How Small Wars End
How Small Wars End (3) This course examines two of the most vexing problems of insurgencies: why asymmetric conflicts pitting weaker non-state actors against stronger established nations typically last so long, and why they often result in tenuous, short-lived peace. The median duration of insurgencies since 1945 is 8.5 years, and barely half end with a resolution that endures for more than a decade. Students in this course gain an understanding of the forces that determine how small wars end and what can be done to create a stable and sustainable post-conflict environment.
SIS-619-007
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: NGOs in Global Governance
NGOs in Global Governance (3) This course critically examines the role of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in international affairs broadly, including global and national governance, civil society and social movements, and socioeconomic development. While the number of NGOs has proliferated since the 1980s, it remains an open question when and whether they influence transnational processes, social norms, or human wellbeing. Throughout the course, primary and secondary sources are used to address these questions. The course considers NGOs at the global and local levels, with a particular focus on the world's poorest countries. The course includes the opportunity to be involved in an ongoing research project, a visit to an NGO in Washington, DC, as well as guest speakers from NGOs.
SIS-619-008
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Transnational Crime/Terrorism
Instructional Method: Online. Transnational Crime and Terrorism (3) Transnational criminals and terrorists interact, particularly in conflict regions and regions of frozen conflict. Terrorists in many regions of the world depend on organized crime to finance their activities and provide them logistical support. This course examines the diverse forms of interaction of transnational crime and corruption, with the relationship of these different groups to the state a central part of the analysis. The class looks at the security, human rights, and social consequences of this interaction.
SIS-619-009
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Comp Int'l Defense Policy
Comparative International Defense Policy (3) This course analyzes the defense policies of various countries and the impact of these policies including national security institutions and decision making, military strategy and doctrine, force structure and procurement priorities, and actual combat performance in war. Using a combination of historical and current case studies, students utilize a comparative analytical approach to examine the political, economic, cultural, strategic, and social influences on a nation's defense policy. A variety of countries are compared and contrasted, including the United States, several major NATO members, and select regional powers throughout the world. Students develop frameworks to critically analyze the defense policies of other countries as well as to articulate that analysis through verbal and written means.
SIS-619-011
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Migration and Security
Instructional Method: Online. Migration and Security (3) Few issues pose as significant a challenge to states as international migration, which affects nearly all critical aspects of governance. The myriad ways that immigration and refugee flows affect state interests, both material and idealistic, creates highly contentious politics where domestic interests clash and defining a national interest is an elusive quest for the state. This course offers students a broad overview of migration and refugee dynamics, and identifies those aspects most challenging to state governance. This includes understanding the factors that generate migration and refugee flows, as well as the politics they generate, both internationally and domestically. The course examines the security implications (broadly defined) of global migration and refugee flows, including defense, homeland security, and economic and societal dimensions. It also considers carefully the human rights implications of these dynamics. The course also examines policy development over the past half-century in a comparative perspective with an eye towards identifying new challenges and generating questions for future research.
SIS-619-013
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Peacekeeping/Humantrn Intrvntn
Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Intervention (3) External actors engage in various types of military intervention in conflict-affected and fragile states: peacekeeping operations, humanitarian interventions, counterinsurgency and counterterrorism. Many of these interventions occur simultaneously in places like Libya, Afghanistan, Mali, the Central African Republic, Haiti, East Timor and the Sudans. This course examines the conditions and decisions behind such military interventions and how they affect everyday people on the ground. Based on specific case studies, students analyze the political, bureaucratic, financial and ethical aspects to peace operations and interventions, including issues of stability versus justice, inclusion, terrorism, gender and sexual abuse, and long-term development.
SIS-619-014
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Comparative Peace Processes
Comparative Peace Processes (3) Peace processes are far more complex than any other kind of international or intergroup negotiation and involve bargaining between the principal conflict parties and among their own internal factions and constituencies, and sometimes involve outside interveners who want to mediate among the parties. While classic approaches to peace processes tend to either emphasize the internal and external political contexts to explain success or failure, or test the theories of international relations related to the termination of war, this course looks at peace processes as complex negotiations that should lead to the end of armed conflict and continue into implementation and the reconstruction of peaceful social and political relations. The course examines peace processes that have failed, those that appear to be succeeding, and those whose outcome remains unclear. Students gain an understanding of the options for structuring such a negotiation, the issues that need to be resolved, the trade-offs and tensions that are involved, and the dangers and challenges along the way. Cases from the last three decades of peace negotiations are analyzed in depth to identify the dynamics, patterns, and factors involved.
SIS-619-015
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Economics of Violence & Peace
Economics of Violence and Peace (3) This course examines political economic issues concerning war and peace, including civil war, terrorism, and insurgency. Taking a broad view that emphasizes the interaction between economic and non-economic factors, including religion and culture, it discusses economic causes of wars, focusing on economic grievances, resources, environmental problems, and poverty; economic consequences of wars; and economic measures for conflict prevention and resolution, as well as post-conflict reconstruction.
SIS-619-016
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Transforming Cultures of Cnflt
Transforming Cultures of Conflict (3) This course falls in the domain of advanced applied culture, peace and conflict resolution. It provides an overview of the cultures of conflict, and how exclusive social identity narratives impact seemingly intractable conflict processes. Students examine the cases of Colombia and Nepal among others, and learn about different tools that have helped transform erstwhile cultures of conflict in these societies. They develop individual cultural transformation toolkits for application to the frozen Kurdish conflict in Turkey.
SIS-619-017
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Gender, Peace, and Security
Gender, Peace, and Security (3) Women's right to participate in policy making on peace and security is a central need of the human race. Moreover, multiple forms of violence against women, from the home to the global system of militarism and sex trafficking, must be a central focus of national security. Militarized security depends on gender inequality, gender inequality is a form of structural violence, and war disproportionately impacts women. These reinforcing cycles of violence can be transformed with research, knowledge, mass participation, mobilization and skills. This course reconceptualizes international relations through a gender lens and "feminist curiosity" by studying gendered theories of power and nonviolent struggle, and exploring cutting-edge strategies for transforming cultural attitudes, norms, and institutions in order to build a more just, humane, and peaceful world order.
SIS-619-018
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: International Security in Asia
Instructional Method: Online. International Security in Asia (3) This course introduces students to alternative ways of looking at Asia's emerging security order using different theories and perspectives on international relations. It also informs students with a comprehensive background in Asian security problems and challenges including the rise of China, Japan, and India, territorial disputes in South and East China Sea, energy and maritime security issues, arms races, intervention, domestic strife and democratization, the role of the United States in Asian security and its military presence and bilateral alliances in the region, and the security architecture of Asia for the twenty-first century.
SIS-619-020
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Environmental Peacemaking
Environmental Peacemaking (3) The focus of the emerging interdisciplinary field of environmental peacemaking is to identify ways that the environment, natural and human, provides opportunities for building bridges of collaboration between conflicting parties. In this course, students deal with concepts from ecopolitics, environmental security studies, international relations, and conflict resolution and develop an understanding of the theoretical framework informing the emerging environmental peacemaking paradigm. It also touches upon the nascent field of environmental peacebuilding, with its focus on relationship-building between conflict actors. The course examines the interactions among violence, conflict, peace, security, and the natural environment. It is structured to create the context for students to address questions including what impact violent conflict has on the environment; is environmental degradation itself a source or trigger of violent conflict; and how environmental cooperation can be used to promote peace and sustainable development.
SIS-619-021
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Methods of Social Innovation
Instructional Method: Hybrid. Methods of Social Innovation (1) This course introduces a wide range of social innovation methodologies that are important to the practice of social enterprise. Students relate these to social issues they plan to address in their career and use them to broaden their professional toolkit and increase their capacity for effective action. Restriction: Social Enterprise (MA).
SIS-619-022
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Transforming Cultures of Cnflt
Transforming Cultures of Conflict (3) This course falls in the domain of advanced applied culture, peace and conflict resolution. It provides an overview of the cultures of conflict, and how exclusive social identity narratives impact seemingly intractable conflict processes. Students examine the cases of Colombia and Nepal among others, and learn about different tools that have helped transform erstwhile cultures of conflict in these societies. They develop individual cultural transformation toolkits for application to the frozen Kurdish conflict in Turkey.
SIS-619-023
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Environmental Peacemaking
Environmental Peacemaking (3) The focus of the emerging interdisciplinary field of environmental peacemaking is to identify ways that the environment, natural and human, provides opportunities for building bridges of collaboration between conflicting parties. In this course, students deal with concepts from ecopolitics, environmental security studies, international relations, and conflict resolution and develop an understanding of the theoretical framework informing the emerging environmental peacemaking paradigm. It also touches upon the nascent field of environmental peacebuilding, with its focus on relationship-building between conflict actors. The course examines the interactions among violence, conflict, peace, security, and the natural environment. It is structured to create the context for students to address questions including what impact violent conflict has on the environment; is environmental degradation itself a source or trigger of violent conflict; and how environmental cooperation can be used to promote peace and sustainable development.