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SIS-620 Stds in Global Envirn Politics Course Level: Graduate

Studies in Global Environmental Politics (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics include water; food and agriculture; climate and energy; policy analysis; sustainable design; comparative environmental politics; and environmental security. Usually Offered: fall, spring, and summer. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

SIS-620-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Intro to Environmental Econ
Introduction to Environmental Economics (3) This course provides an overview of the uses of economics in the context of environmental issues and of the key topics in environmental policy today. The course introduces the market forces that affect the environment and discusses the relative merits of different methods of pollution control such as taxes or cap-and-trade. Students learn how to value the benefits and costs of an improvement in air quality or of the protection of a natural park. This knowledge is then applied to policy topics such as the links between economic growth and the environment, or the question of environmental justice. Prerequisite: ECON-603.
SIS-620-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Water Governance
Water Governance (3) Examines international and cross-national dimensions of water politics and policy. Major themes include international and comparative water law; cooperation and conflict in shared river basins; water, poverty, and economic development; transnational activism and civil society; water, violent conflict, and peacebuilding; water and climate change.
SIS-620-003
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Global Climate Change
Global Climate Change (3) An interdisciplinary look at the history, science, policy, and politics of preventing global climate change. This course, for non-specialists as well as environmental studies students, focuses on how we created one of humanity's biggest problems and how to solve it, particularly through education, communications, organizing, and advocacy.
SIS-620-004
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Pol Ecol of Food & Agriculture
Political Ecology of Food and Agriculture (3) Food presents a unique lens to examine political, cultural, and technological connections to environment and development. This course provides students with an introduction to political ecology and its approach to global food studies. Students use political ecology and social theory paradigms to examine industrial and alternative food networks, including their impacts on the environment, communities, and rural development. Students also examine how food policy and the global food trading system shape these networks and local environments, communities, and development practices.
SIS-620-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Sustainable Dsg/LEED Training
Sustainable Design and LEED Training (3) Following the structure of the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for green building rating systems, this course combines discussions of theories on sustainable design; field work on specific environmental topics ranging from sustainable sites through innovation in design; and directed study of the LEED Reference Guides and rating systems, with the goal of achieving the LEED Green Associate credential through examination.
SIS-620-002
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Policy Analysis for GEP
Policy Analysis for Global Environmental Politics (3) Provides critical literacy in the major policy-analytic techniques used in environmental policy, including cost-benefit analysis, risk assessment, impact assessment, multi-stakeholder processes, effectiveness assessment, conflict/post-conflict assessment, sustainability indicators, and social marketing. Emphasis is placed on analytic techniques most commonly used in and around international institutions.
SIS-620-003
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Politics of Conservation
Politics of Conservation (3) This course considers the environmental and human impacts of environmental conservation interventions. From parks and protected areas to carbon financing, the course considers what conservation attempts to do and examines its intended and unintended consequences, particularly as they pertain to marginalized groups.
SIS-620-004
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Environmental Justice
Environmental Justice (3) The roots of the environmental justice (EJ) movement in the United States are often pegged to activism against a toxic landfill in an African American community in North Carolina in the 1980s. However, the EJ movement can be traced further back to the Civil Rights Movement, as well as to activism surrounding Latinx farmworker justice. EJ movements have also taken place globally, especially in response to the polluting and dispossessing activities of multinational corporations and state projects. Theorizing "the environment" capaciously, this course examines the structural and historical roots of environmental injustices across the global North and South, and considers the range of strategies and discourses of different actors in struggles for justice. Tacking between critical social theory, history, and critical analysis of policies and regulations, the course familiarizes students with Marxist, postcolonial/decolonial, black radical, post-structural, post-humanist, and feminist theories shaping EJ, among others, as well as conversations in the related fields of urban political ecology, critical geography, anthropology, and development studies.