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INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-628 Advanced Topics in Int'l Comm Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in International Communication (1-3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics include cross-cultural collaboration in global virtual teams; health and culture across borders; public diplomacy; social entrepreneurship; global innovation without frontiers; social media and cultural-political transformation; race, class, and power in international education; field research in health communication; foreign media and public opinion; managing international and intercultural programs and exchanges; health communication, disability policy and organization; cyber-conflict in global perspective; and mass media and terrorism. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

SIS-628-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Glbl Media As Strat Cultl Dipl
Global Media as Strategic Cultural Diplomacy (3) This course follows the trajectory of global media initiatives from colonial periods through nation-building and modernization eras, and into the current development aid context. It considers how governments and international organizations have used global media initiatives to "educate" and "develop" populations, with the goals of strengthening democracy, creating stable economies, increasing literacy, improving health outcomes, and fostering peace and unity. Students critically examine how current media initiatives sometimes echo the imperialistic "civilizing" and "modernizing" missions of previous eras and interrogate the power dynamics inherent in global media flows. In addition to examining Western and non-Western governments' use of media for development, case studies of transnational/multinational media corporations in disseminating knowledge and influencing consumption and markets are analyzed. Students draw on class theories and examples to create and propose a pilot global media initiative. Meets with SIS-628 002.
SIS-628-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Glbl Media As Strat Cultl Dipl
Global Media as Strategic Cultural Diplomacy (3) This course follows the trajectory of global media initiatives from colonial periods through nation-building and modernization eras, and into the current development aid context. It considers how governments and international organizations have used global media initiatives to "educate" and "develop" populations, with the goals of strengthening democracy, creating stable economies, increasing literacy, improving health outcomes, and fostering peace and unity. Students critically examine how current media initiatives sometimes echo the imperialistic "civilizing" and "modernizing" missions of previous eras and interrogate the power dynamics inherent in global media flows. In addition to examining Western and non-Western governments' use of media for development, case studies of transnational/multinational media corporations in disseminating knowledge and influencing consumption and markets are analyzed. Students draw on class theories and examples to create and propose a pilot global media initiative. Restriction: International Arts Management (Graduate Certificate). Meets with SIS-628 001.
SIS-628-002
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Postcolonialism, Race & IR
Postcolonialism, Race and International Relations (3) This course draws on the postcolonial and decolonial literatures to interrogate relations of power in international relations, broadly defined. Much of modern history has been a struggle between empire and decolonization, and this continues today with neoliberal governmentality. The course focuses on the ways in which race has been a major factor in these historical and contemporary developments.
SIS-628-003
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Strat Comm: Nations/Cultures
Strategic Communication Among Nations and Cultures (3) This course examines the rising importance of persuasive communication and its related strategies in international relations among both state and non-state actors. The course includes understanding strategic communication theories and approaches, the dynamics of cooperation and conflict in communication campaigns, communication-based influence operations (including "fake news"), the role of propaganda, and the uses of soft power by both state and non-state actors. Students learn how to develop and deploy strategic communication plans and campaigns and to understand the ethics of strategic communication.
SIS-628-004
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Transnational Education
Transnational Education (3) As our world experiences major changes, education, too, is undergoing rapid transformation. Globalization, migration, technological innovation, intercultural conflict, global poverty, and economic crises are shaping and reshaping the nature, meaning, and deployment of education throughout the world. This course considers questions such as how and why nation-states are increasingly relying on education as a tool of statecraft, nation-branding, nationalism, and public diplomacy. By synergizing key interdisciplinary concepts from international relations, sociology, anthropology, critical theory, history, political science, and intercultural communication, the course explores contemporary education as a quintessentially transnational phenomenon with powerful implications that are simultaneously global and local. Drawing from a critical perspective, students examine the actors involved in current educational policy and practice, and consider their interests and relationships. Students also evaluate the impact of this phenomenon for global social institutions, nation-states, communities, and individuals.
SIS-628-005
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Global Persp on Pub Diplomacy
Global Perspective on Public Diplomacy (3) This course provides an introduction to the conceptual and theoretical foundations for public diplomacy programs, new media public diplomacy initiatives, and how media outlets are used by international actors to influence global public opinion. The course covers issues and theories related to soft power, strategic communication, and media-based international relations. It reviews contemporary debates on U.S. public diplomacy and the public diplomacy initiatives of other nation-states and non-state actors. The course is a comprehensive inquiry into assumptions that continue to justify and define the evolving range of policies related to public diplomacy and strategic communication.
SIS-628-006
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Managing Int'l/Intrcultrl Prog
Managing International/Intercultural Programs/Exchanges (3) This course examines the cultural, political, and economic dimensions of managing international and intercultural programs in the context of internationalization of university and college campuses. It includes international student and scholar programs and services, study abroad initiatives, and curriculum transformation. Students conduct related research including the use of case studies, and various assessment tools and models.
SIS-628-007
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Comm Econ to Non-Economists
Communicating Economics to Non-Economists (3) Communicating information about the economy is too important to leave to economists. This course aims to enable non-economists to follow and effectively communicate developments in the economy and contribute knowledgeably to debates about policy choices. The focus is on macroeconomics, which is the study of incomes. The course helps students understand why income goes up or down, and why they differ across countries and people; what has happened to incomes over the past few decades and how incomes are associated with jobs and prices; how the policies of central banks and finance ministries affect incomes, jobs, and prices; how incomes, jobs, and prices are affected by globalization; the advice that economists offer on how to boost incomes and jobs while keeping prices stable; and how to communicate these ideas effectively to public audiences.
SIS-628-008
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Transnational Education
Transnational Education (3) As our world experiences major changes, education, too, is undergoing rapid transformation. Globalization, migration, technological innovation, intercultural conflict, global poverty, and economic crises are shaping and reshaping the nature, meaning, and deployment of education throughout the world. This course considers questions such as how and why nation-states are increasingly relying on education as a tool of statecraft, nation-branding, nationalism, and public diplomacy. By synergizing key interdisciplinary concepts from international relations, sociology, anthropology, critical theory, history, political science, and intercultural communication, the course explores contemporary education as a quintessentially transnational phenomenon with powerful implications that are simultaneously global and local. Drawing from a critical perspective, students examine the actors involved in current educational policy and practice, and consider their interests and relationships. Students also evaluate the impact of this phenomenon for global social institutions, nation-states, communities, and individuals.