Office of the Registrar

Course Descriptions

To view course descriptions for all courses in a single subject:

  1. Select the subject from the drop-down list
  2. Click Get Descriptions

Searching course descriptions by keyword is currently unavailable.

Course: -

INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-635
Advanced Topics in Development Management (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include rural development; managing economic and political reform; etc. Usually offered every term.

SIS-635
001
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in Development Management (3)

Social Enterprise: Context and Best Practices

Focuses on the ecology and tool kit of the successful social entrepreneur. Provides exposure to techniques such as appreciative inquiry and asset-based planning, design thinking, small wins, positive deviance, systems thinking, and applied innovation diffusion theory. The basics of branding, positioning, and revenue-based business models are also considered in relation to social enterprises.

SIS-635
002
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in Development Management (3)

Introduction to Social Enterprise

Exposure to the key ideas and institutions involved with social enterprise. The field's relationship with business entrepreneurship is considered, and special attention is paid to the ethical dilemmas faces by social entrepreneurs. Open only to students in the MA in Social Enterprise

SIS-635
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in Development Management (3)

NGO/Social Enterprise Management

This course for students who plan on, or are considering, a career in nonprofit service-providing or advocacy organizations, gives students an opportunity to apply management best practices to the challenges of running a non-governmental organization (NGO). Students acquire the knowledge needed to organize an effective NGO from the ground up. Equal emphasis throughout the course is given to practicalities of management that keep an organization afloat, and the dynamics of leadership that move it forward. The course covers goal setting, fundraising, strategy formulation, governance, and organization design, and the techniques used to identify opportunities, motivate colleagues, build momentum, use power, and win hearts-and-minds. Special emphasis is given to the emerging practices used by social entrepreneurs and how they can be applied in a broad range of NGOs.

SIS-635
004
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in Development Management (3)

Youth and International Development

This course provides students with adequate tools for understanding the intersections between youth cultures and development concerns, primarily in developing but also in industrialized countries. Students examine varying attitudes towards, and treatment of, youth in different societies, trends among youth in political engagement, community development, responses to new information technologies, and participation in the development work and advancement of social justice and peace building. They also explore the various challenges youth face with respect to education, employment, health, security and identity concerns.

SIS-635
009
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in Development Management (3)

Health in the Developing World

This course is based on the assumption that health is a necessary component of development. It explores current health problems in developing countries, how they are drawn along intersecting social categories of geography, gender, race, and class, and innovative solutions to these health inequalities. The course takes a public health approach to global health problems, which involves reducing preventable morbidity and premature mortality and promoting a higher quality of life in populations and groups through health intervention. Emphasis is placed on primary prevention, rather than secondary or tertiary prevention. Students are also exposed to a variety of public health approaches to interventions in developing countries. Although biological, physical, and medical care factors contribute to population health outcomes, this course emphasizes the relationship of behaviors as well as social and political structures to health outcomes. Students learn concrete tools for developing health interventions and work in groups to develop a program plan addressing one of the health topics covered in the course.

SIS-635
007
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in Development Management (3)

Program Design, Monitoring, and Evaluation

This course helps students develop a thorough understanding of qualitative and basic quantitative tools and approaches to international program evaluation. With needs, priorities, and agendas contested across political scales and economic sectors, evaluation is not only a technically demanding exercise; it is an intensely political process. Students develop skills in understanding methodological as well as epistemological and ontological underpinnings of program evaluation and how these influence research design and data interpretation; designing research for evaluative purposes and critically assessing its validity, reliability, efficiency, and effectiveness; reading and coding data, developing report outlines, and presenting findings in appropriate formats. In addition to skill development, the course also challenges students in their roles as development practitioners to identify ethical dilemmas in the context of evaluation and to reflect on appropriate responses. The course includes brief lectures, in-class exercises, problem sets, a real world case study, and discussion in groups and plenary. Prerequisite: SIS-600.

SIS-635
008
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in Development Management (3)

Social Accountability

This course addresses the challenges involved in promoting pro-poor institutional change. Despite the proliferation of elected governments around the world, accountable governance remains elusive for many. Governance refers to how public, civil society and private sector organizations make decisions, while accountability refers to the processes through which actors are held responsible for their decisions. The study of the relationship between governance and accountability sheds light on the classic question of "who gets what, how and why." This course focuses on institutional innovations that attempt to make development policy more publicly accountable, across a wide range of countries, actors, issue areas and institutions. The course analyzes who is, or should be, accountable to whom, as clients become citizens and bureaucrats become public servants. Cases include both state and society-led change initiatives, including experiences with state-society partnerships. The course's core concepts draw from interdisciplinary institutional analysis, and research strategies studied include the comparative method, institutional ethnography and semi-experimental approaches.