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INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-653 Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3) Topics vary by section. Topics include substantive national security issues such as terrorism, non-proliferation, intelligence, and defense polices, as well as U.S. foreign policy toward specific regions or countries. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

SIS-653-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Continuity & Change in USFP
Continuity and Change in U.S. Foreign Policy (3) This course examines continuities and incongruities in U.S. foreign policy since 1789, with the greatest emphasis on the Cold War and post-Cold War periods. It includes extensive use of primary documents.
SIS-653-004
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: U.S. Counterterrorism Policy
U.S. Counterterrorism Policy since 9/11 (3) After a brief overview of counterterrorism literature and theories, this course surveys the way in which the United states addressed terrorism prior to 9/11 and the policy challenges it confronted in the aftermath of the attacks. The course explores the development of counterterrorism policies by the Bush and the Obama administrations and analytically evaluates their effectiveness. Students develop a comprehensive understanding of what part counterterrorism plays in national security and what the outlook is for countering these threats.
SIS-653-005
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Cyber Pol, Conflct & Int'l Aff
Cyber Policy, Conflict and International Affairs (3) This course examines the intersection between the uses (and abuses) of cyberspace in international relations, which is now an integral part of national and global security, economic relations, and transnational politics. Students gain knowledge of the core issues in cyber-related policy issues, and the promises and perils of global e-commerce. Students also gain understanding of the dynamics of cyber activism as an arena for effecting political change and expressing human rights.
SIS-653-006
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Technology & National Security
Technology and National Security (3) This course examines the impact of science and technology on relations between nations, as well as the history of science and technology policy in order to gain an understanding of measures that have historically been employed to manage these issues. The course employs the use of case studies (including nuclear energy, biotechnology, and unmanned aerial systems) to understand the state of several technologies, the current control measures that govern these areas and consider the adequacy of these measures now and in the future.
SIS-653-007
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: USFP toward the Middle East
U.S. Foreign Policy toward the Middle East (3) This course provides students with a detailed understanding of the history of America's relations with the countries of the greater Middle East as well as of current issues in United States policy towards the region. The course not only analyses the Arab-Israeli issue in depth, but also explores the domestic and international constraints that affect overall U.S. policy toward the Middle East.
SIS-653-008
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Grand Strategy
Grand Strategy (3) This course uses the traditional tools of history and political theory to analyze the concept of grand strategy. Grand strategy is the highest and most complex level of strategy, involving all the resources of the state (political, cultural, military, economic, etc.), and integrating all the tools of the government (diplomacy, economic aid, military force, trade, and so forth) to achieve the objectives of policy. The course begins by analyzing Thucydides' history of the Peloponnesian War, then examines China during the warring states period and Machiavelli's Florence in the sixteenth century. From there, the course addresses war and statecraft throughout the modern era, including Clausewitz and the French Revolution, World War I, World War II, the Cold War, nuclear strategy, decolonization and insurgency, and finally the so-called Global War on Terrorism, and finally considering if grand strategy is looking beyond war to the nature of peace, what that can tell us about war and peace in the twenty-first century.
SIS-653-009
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Public Diplomacy
Public Diplomacy (3) Public diplomacy is generally defined as understanding, engaging, informing, and influencing foreign publics. This course provides an understanding of the history and dynamics of U.S. public diplomacy; knowledge of strategies and techniques for advocating policy and influencing opinion and behavior of international audiences in a Web 2.0 age; skills to communicate, especially in writing; an understanding of how to analyze key data, including opinion polls and audience surveys; and an ability to engage with the key moral, political, and practical dimensions of public diplomacy.
SIS-653-010
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Int'l Cyber Risk & Sec Meth
International Cyber Risk and Security Methods (3) The problem of cyber-related risks and safeguards is global in nature. Determining the level of protection and the ways of detecting cyber exploitation and attack require specialized skills and strategies. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to perform strategic and tactical risk management of critical infrastructure and national security information assets. The course also informs students about the methods used in cyber security analytical tools, forensics, and monitoring that address such problems as attribution, anonymity, authentication, and intelligence collection.
SIS-653-011
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: U.S. Nat'l Security Strategy
U.S. National Security Strategy (3) This historically-oriented course examines how the United States has sought to protect and promote its national security since the founding of the country. After a brief examination of early U.S. strategy, the bulk of the course investigates trends in American strategy since the beginning of the twentieth century. The last part of the course assesses President Barack Obama's national security strategy and a variety of ideas for addressing contemporary security challenges.
SIS-653-001
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Issues in Intelligence
Issues in Intelligence (3) Changes in technology, law, society, and governance are changing the business and possibilities of intelligence. On one hand, states and non-state actors have powerful new tools for surveillance, analysis, and disruption. On the other, formerly successful institutional forms find themselves unable to adjust, and public scrutiny of clandestine activities has never been greater. This course examines the theory and history of intelligence to establish a context for understanding these trends, and then explores recent events and likely developments to gain insight into the future of intelligence as a tool of state policy and a factor in international affairs.
SIS-653-002
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: National Security Resources
National Security Resources (3) This course examines in detail how the federal government determines the budgets for defense, foreign policy, homeland security, and intelligence. It also analyzes how the executive and congressional processes for allocating national security resources affect national security itself.
SIS-653-003
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Bioterror in the 21st Century
Bioterror in the Twenty-first Century (3) This course examines the potential for bioterror attack. In this twenty-first century globalized world, the proliferation of biotechnology and a new wave of terror have combined to set the conditions for an increasingly likely attack using weapons of mass destruction (WMD) including biological weapons. The course also introduces the science behind biological weapons, examines U.S. government efforts to prepare for and respond to a bioterror attack, and investigates the policy implications of this emerging threat.
SIS-653-005
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Continuity & Change in USFP
Continuity and Change in U.S. Foreign Policy (3) This course examines continuities and incongruities in U.S. foreign policy since 1789, with the greatest emphasis on the Cold War and post-Cold War periods. It includes extensive use of primary documents.
SIS-653-006
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Transatlantic Security
Transatlantic Security (3) This course examines the evolution of trans-Atlantic security policy and defense planning. It begins with a review of the formation of NATO and of trans-Atlantic defense policy and military force planning through the Cold War to the breakup of the Soviet Union. The course then focuses in some detail on the transformation that trans-Atlantic security relations have undergone, in particular the shift of NATO's focus from defense of European territory to expeditionary operations outside its boundaries and the European Union's assuming a strong role in defense planning.
SIS-653-007
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Terrorism and Counterterrorism
Terrorism and Counterterrorism (3) This course focuses on terrorism and how to counter it, utilizing case studies from multiple regions. Students may focus their research on an area of interest.
SIS-653-008
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Nuclear Weapons: Pol & Prolif
Nuclear Weapons: Politics and Proliferation (3) Nuclear weapons have played a central role in U.S. national security and international security since 1945. The United States is currently poised to modernize its nuclear arsenal over the coming decades and terrorist access to nuclear weapons and materials remains a top national security concern. Other countries, specifically Russia, are also modernizing their nuclear weapons. At the same time, pressure is growing for disarmament. This course helps students understand the role of nuclear weapons in U.S. decisions about national security, including the politics of nuclear weapons decision making in the United States, the role of nuclear weapons more broadly in U.S. strategy, and explanations for why other countries pursue, develop, or forego nuclear weapons.
SIS-653-009
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Nat'l Security in Cyberspace
National Security in Cyberspace (3) This course explores how states use cyberspace to achieve their objectives; how offensive and defensive cyber capabilities interact with traditional policy tools; and how the U.S. approach to cybersecurity has evolved.
SIS-653-010
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Grand Strategy
Grand Strategy (3) This course uses the traditional tools of history and political theory to analyze the concept of grand strategy. Grand strategy is the highest and most complex level of strategy, involving all the resources of the state (political, cultural, military, economic, etc.), and integrating all the tools of the government (diplomacy, economic aid, military force, trade, and so forth) to achieve the objectives of policy. The course begins by analyzing Thucydides' history of the Peloponnesian War, then examines China during the warring states period and Machiavelli's Florence in the sixteenth century. From there, the course addresses war and statecraft throughout the modern era, including Clausewitz and the French Revolution, World War I, World War II, the Cold War, nuclear strategy, decolonization and insurgency, and finally the so-called Global War on Terrorism, and finally considering if grand strategy is looking beyond war to the nature of peace, what that can tell us about war and peace in the twenty-first century.
SIS-653-011
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: How Terrorism Ends
How Terrorism Ends (3) This seminar examines the long-standing experience of how terrorist campaigns end in order to encourage a strategic approach to reducing this form of violence. Among other things, the class discusses the political and historical context for today's terrorist threat; how the threat of terrorism is likely to evolve and how terrorists innovate; why some terrorist organizations eventually transform into more peaceful political movements or disappear; the international experience in responding to a terrorist threat; what are effective strategies for preventing terrorism from arising in the first place; and, especially, how do terrorist campaigns end.
SIS-653-012
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: USFP: South Asia/Persian Gulf
Instructional Method: Online. U.S. Foreign Policy toward South Asia and the Persian Gulf (3) The South Asian region from India westward through the Persian Gulf is potentially one of the most explosive areas in the world, and yet critical to U.S. security interests. Analyses too often compartmentalize countries in the region. In contrast, this course looks at the connections between the parts of the region, the ways in which U.S. policy towards one country historically has affected other countries and in turn challenged U.S. goals, and the prospects for peace and development in the region.
SIS-653-013
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Diplomatic Practice
Diplomatic Practice (3) This seminar studies diplomacy in theory, history, and practice, as a political process and as an instrument of foreign policy. It covers diplomats' relations with their own governments as well as the countries in which they serve; how they use information on the politics, economics, and society of their host nation; the origin and costs of mistakes; and the future of diplomacy in an era of globalization and instant communication. It seeks to illustrate approaches to diplomacy through historical examples and contemporary case studies, linking diplomatic practice to current events.
SIS-653-201
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Issues in Intelligence
Special Tuition Rate. Issues in Intelligence (3) Changes in technology, law, society, and governance are changing the business and possibilities of intelligence. On one hand, states and non-state actors have powerful new tools for surveillance, analysis, and disruption. On the other, formerly successful institutional forms find themselves unable to adjust, and public scrutiny of clandestine activities has never been greater. This course examines the theory and history of intelligence to establish a context for understanding these trends, and then explores recent events and likely developments to gain insight into the future of intelligence as a tool of state policy and a factor in international affairs. Restriction: International Relations (MA): Online, International Service (MIS): Online or Social Enterprise (MA): Online. Meets with SIS-653 001.
SIS-653-206
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Transatlantic Security
Transatlantic Security (3) This course examines the evolution of trans-Atlantic security policy and defense planning. It begins with a review of the formation of NATO and of trans-Atlantic defense policy and military force planning through the Cold War to the breakup of the Soviet Union. The course then focuses in some detail on the transformation that trans-Atlantic security relations have undergone, in particular the shift of NATO's focus from defense of European territory to expeditionary operations outside its boundaries and the European Union's assuming a strong role in defense planning. Restriction: International Relations (MA): Online or International Service (MIS): Online or Social Enterprise (MA): Online. Meets with SIS-653 00.
SIS-653-001
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Art/Science Intelligence Anlys
Art and Science of Intelligence Analysis (3) An overview of the thinking, writing, and briefing skills used in intelligence analysis, along with the role of analysis in shaping foreign policy and military action.