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INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-653 Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3) Topics vary by section. Topics include substantive national security issues such as terrorism, non-proliferation, intelligence, and defense polices, as well as U.S. foreign policy toward specific regions or countries. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

SIS-653-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Continuity & Change in USFP
Continuity and Change in U.S. Foreign Policy (3) This course examines continuities and incongruities in U.S. foreign policy since 1789, with the greatest emphasis on the Cold War and post-Cold War periods. It includes extensive use of primary documents.
SIS-653-004
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: U.S. Counterterrorism Policy
U.S. Counterterrorism Policy since 9/11 (3) After a brief overview of counterterrorism literature and theories, this course surveys the way in which the United states addressed terrorism prior to 9/11 and the policy challenges it confronted in the aftermath of the attacks. The course explores the development of counterterrorism policies by the Bush and the Obama administrations and analytically evaluates their effectiveness. Students develop a comprehensive understanding of what part counterterrorism plays in national security and what the outlook is for countering these threats. Meets with SIS-653 204.
SIS-653-005
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Cyber Pol, Conflct & Int'l Aff
Cyber Policy, Conflict and International Affairs (3) This course examines the intersection between the uses (and abuses) of cyberspace in international relations, which is now an integral part of national and global security, economic relations, and transnational politics. Students gain knowledge of the core issues in cyber-related policy issues, and the promises and perils of global e-commerce. Students also gain understanding of the dynamics of cyber activism as an arena for effecting political change and expressing human rights.
SIS-653-006
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Technology & National Security
Technology and National Security (3) This course examines the impact of science and technology on relations between nations, as well as the history of science and technology policy in order to gain an understanding of measures that have historically been employed to manage these issues. The course employs the use of case studies (including nuclear energy, biotechnology, and unmanned aerial systems) to understand the state of several technologies, the current control measures that govern these areas and consider the adequacy of these measures now and in the future.
SIS-653-007
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: USFP toward the Middle East
U.S. Foreign Policy toward the Middle East (3) This course provides students with a detailed understanding of the history of America's relations with the countries of the greater Middle East as well as of current issues in United States policy towards the region. The course not only analyses the Arab-Israeli issue in depth, but also explores the domestic and international constraints that affect overall U.S. policy toward the Middle East.
SIS-653-008
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Grand Strategy
Grand Strategy (3) This course uses the traditional tools of history and political theory to analyze the concept of grand strategy. Grand strategy is the highest and most complex level of strategy, involving all the resources of the state (political, cultural, military, economic, etc.), and integrating all the tools of the government (diplomacy, economic aid, military force, trade, and so forth) to achieve the objectives of policy. The course begins by analyzing Thucydides' history of the Peloponnesian War, then examines China during the warring states period and Machiavelli's Florence in the sixteenth century. From there, the course addresses war and statecraft throughout the modern era, including Clausewitz and the French Revolution, World War I, World War II, the Cold War, nuclear strategy, decolonization and insurgency, and finally the so-called Global War on Terrorism, and finally considering if grand strategy is looking beyond war to the nature of peace, what that can tell us about war and peace in the twenty-first century.
SIS-653-009
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Public Diplomacy
Public Diplomacy (3) Public diplomacy is generally defined as understanding, engaging, informing, and influencing foreign publics. This course provides an understanding of the history and dynamics of U.S. public diplomacy; knowledge of strategies and techniques for advocating policy and influencing opinion and behavior of international audiences in a Web 2.0 age; skills to communicate, especially in writing; an understanding of how to analyze key data, including opinion polls and audience surveys; and an ability to engage with the key moral, political, and practical dimensions of public diplomacy.
SIS-653-010
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Int'l Cyber Risk & Sec Meth
International Cyber Risk and Security Methods (3) The problem of cyber-related risks and safeguards is global in nature. Determining the level of protection and the ways of detecting cyber exploitation and attack require specialized skills and strategies. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to perform strategic and tactical risk management of critical infrastructure and national security information assets. The course also informs students about the methods used in cyber security analytical tools, forensics, and monitoring that address such problems as attribution, anonymity, authentication, and intelligence collection.
SIS-653-011
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: U.S. Nat'l Security Strategy
U.S. National Security Strategy (3) This historically-oriented course examines how the United States has sought to protect and promote its national security since the founding of the country. After a brief examination of early U.S. strategy, the bulk of the course investigates trends in American strategy since the beginning of the twentieth century. The last part of the course assesses President Barack Obama's national security strategy and a variety of ideas for addressing contemporary security challenges.
SIS-653-204
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: U.S. Counterterrorism Policy
Special Tuition Rate. U.S. Counterterrorism Policy since 9/11 (3) After a brief overview of counterterrorism literature and theories, this course surveys the way in which the United states addressed terrorism prior to 9/11 and the policy challenges it confronted in the aftermath of the attacks. The course explores the development of counterterrorism policies by the Bush and the Obama administrations and analytically evaluates their effectiveness. Students develop a comprehensive understanding of what part counterterrorism plays in national security and what the outlook is for countering these threats. Restriction: International Relations (MA) or International Service (MIS): Online or Social Enterprise (MA): Online. Meets with SIS-653 004.
SIS-653-001
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Art/Science Intelligence Anlys
Art and Science of Intelligence Analysis (3) An overview of the thinking, writing, and briefing skills used in intelligence analysis, along with the role of analysis in shaping foreign policy and military action.
SIS-653-001
Term: Spring 2019 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: USFP Toward Latin America
U.S. Foreign Policy Toward Latin America (3) This course examines U.S. foreign policy towards Latin America by focusing on the factors that shape U.S. foreign policy. The course considers the extent to which U.S. policy is shaped by the nature of the U.S. impact on Latin America.
SIS-653-002
Term: Spring 2019 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Continuity & Change in USFP
Continuity and Change in U.S. Foreign Policy (3) This course examines continuities and incongruities in U.S. foreign policy since 1789, with the greatest emphasis on the Cold War and post-Cold War periods. It includes extensive use of primary documents.
SIS-653-003
Term: Spring 2019 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: New Technologies/Emerg Threats
New Technologies and Emerging Threats (3) New technologies are changing the distribution of power throughout the world, not just between states such as Russia, China, and the United States but also between states and individuals. They are enhancing the power of some individuals even as they increase the vulnerability of others. The worldwide dispersal of emerging technologies is exposing gaping fissures between modern conventional armed forces and the growing capabilities of nonstate actors such as criminals, insurgents, "patriotic hackers," and groups that rely on terrorism. The technologies of the so-called Fourth Industrial Revolution are disrupting global affairs in ways that must be better analyzed and anticipated. This course explores the ethical, strategic, and economic implications of a broad range of new phenomena, including social media, unmanned aircraft system (UAS or drones), additive manufacturing (3-D printing), smart devices, the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, semi-autonomous systems, and, most importantly, the prospect of full artificial intelligence.
SIS-653-004
Term: Spring 2019 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Diplomatic Practice
Diplomatic Practice (3) This seminar studies diplomacy in theory, history, and practice, as a political process and as an instrument of foreign policy. It covers diplomats' relations with their own governments as well as the countries in which they serve; how they use information on the politics, economics, and society of their host nation; the origin and costs of mistakes; and the future of diplomacy in an era of globalization and instant communication. It seeks to illustrate approaches to diplomacy through historical examples and contemporary case studies, linking diplomatic practice to current events.
SIS-653-005
Term: Spring 2019 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Cyber/Terror/Espionage/Crime
Cyber Warfare, Terrorism, Espionage, and Crime (3) Cyberspace plays an increasingly important role in diplomacy and global conflict. This course examines the issues and controversies surrounding the use of cyberspace for warfare, terrorism, espionage, and cybercrime. Students gain a thorough knowledge of the core concepts, issues, policy options, and potential futures of conflict in cyberspace. Note: Technical knowledge of digital media and networks is not required.
SIS-653-006
Term: Spring 2019 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Terrorism and Counterterrorism
Terrorism and Counterterrorism (3) This course examines terrorism to understand why, when, and how actors choose to employ this type of political violence. This includes an ongoing dialogue about whether to understand terrorism as a criminal act or an act of war, which is particularly important when discussing counterterrorism responses domestically and internationally. The primary focus is on the use of terrorism by non-state actors, although state-sponsored terrorism is also covered. Various theories related to the study of terrorism are discussed, but in concert with a healthy focus on empirical examples in order to understand how theory meets practice.
SIS-653-007
Term: Spring 2019 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Intro to American Intelligence
Introduction to American Intelligence (3) This course describes at a practical level how the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) functions today. The course employs history and current events to teach the activities of U.S. intelligence in the past and show how today's effort evolved from that of the past. The course assesses how the necessity of secrecy affects real-world practice and shows how senior policymakers (White House, National Security Council, Department of Defense, Department of State, Department of Homeland Security, etc.) and midlevel U.S. government (USG) officials use intelligence. Students learn to evaluate public discussions about intelligence, a skill that serves them beyond the conclusion of this course. The course features current and former American intelligence professionals in the Washington, DC area as guest speakers.
SIS-653-008
Term: Spring 2019 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Resource Allocation & Natl Sec
Resource Allocation and National Security: Follow the Money (3) The budget process is the main vehicle through which priorities are set and plans and programs are developed and implemented for everything from building and supporting military forces to providing development assistance to fighting wars. This course provides students with an understanding of the formal process, rules and restrictions that shape the budgeting process for defense, international affairs and the intelligence community, as well as the "informal" factors that impact this inherently political mechanism in both the executive branch and Congress.