You are here: Course Descriptions

INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-676 Sel Topics in Cross-Natl Study Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics in Cross-National Studies (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics, usually with a comparative or regional focus, include political economy of Africa; theories of nationalism; etc. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

SIS-676-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: U.S. & Russia since 1991
The United States and Russia since 1991 (3) When the Soviet Union ceased to exist on December 25, 1991, hopes were high that the United States and Russia could turn the page on their Cold War rivalry. The United States and its allies provided massive economic assistance to support Russia's fledgling democracy, but tensions emerged over a range of issues in Europe and the Middle East. This course explores the early efforts made by the United States to support post-Soviet Russia, the reasons for the tensions that emerged between the two nations, and the roots of the more recent conflicts that have caused a deterioration in U.S.-Russia relations not seen since the late 1970s/early 1980s, and then looks at the prospects for the future.
SIS-676-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Political Economy of MENA
Instructional Method: Online. Political Economy of the Middle East and North Africa (3) This course examines the political economy of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. The course introduces students to the complex sets of political and economic factors that shape state and society in the region. Topics covered include economic history and development; different models of the state; the role of culture and identity in politics; and state-society dynamics. Themes covered include the legacy of colonialism, rentier states and military autocracies, religious political and economic institutions, informal economies, and grassroots mobilization in autocratic states.
SIS-676-002
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: U.S.-China Relations
U.S.-China Relations (3) This course begins with an overview of U.S.-China relations from historical and theoretical perspectives, providing the background necessary to comprehend the domestic foundations of foreign policy. It then examines politics and foreign policies of China and the United States, and interactions between the two powers. Includes security, economic, and diplomatic relations as well as their impact on international relations in Asia-Pacific including Japan, South Korea, and Southeast Asia. The course also introduces a variety of perspectives as analytical tools for research, and analyzes significant controversies as a way of participating in the field's theoretical and policy debates.
SIS-676-003
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Asia Comp Persp: Gov, Dev, Sec
Asia in Comparative Perspective: Governance, Development, Security (3) This course analyzes the political systems, political economies, and international relations of East and Southeast Asia, one of the world's most dynamic, diverse, and geo-strategically important regions. The course applies a comparative perspective to governance (democratic and authoritarian), economic development (state-led and market-based), security (traditional and non-traditional/human security), and foreign policy issues. Countries compared include China, Japan, South Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, Singapore, and Vietnam. The overarching themes are explored in the context of the geo-political power shift as China seeks to challenge long-standing United States military dominance and Japanese economic influence in the Asia-Pacific region, expand its state-driven economic model, and remake the regional order to align closely with its interests. The course also examines the impact of the U.S.-China rivalry/competitive coexistence on the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and ASEAN-led regional institutions such as the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF), ASEAN Plus Three (APT), and the East Asia Summit (EAS).
SIS-676-004
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: State and Society in Africa
State and Society in Africa (3) This course explores the politics, economics, and society of sub-Sahara Africa in comparative perspective. It analyzes issues such as the nature of African state building, the elusiveness of economic development, when democracy emerges and why it is sustained. The readings encourage critical thinking about enduring impact of historical and social contexts, utilizing evidence from case studies, regional trends, and broader comparative theories.