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INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-676 Sel Topics in Cross-Natl Study Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics in Cross-National Studies (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics, usually with a comparative or regional focus, include political economy of Africa; theories of nationalism; etc. Repeatable for credit with different topic.

SIS-676-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: U.S. & Russia since 1991
The United States and Russia since 1991 (3) When the Soviet Union ceased to exist on December 25, 1991, hopes were high that the United States and Russia could turn the page on their Cold War rivalry. The United States and its allies provided massive economic assistance to support Russia's fledgling democracy, but tensions emerged over a range of issues in Europe and the Middle East. This course explores the early efforts made by the United States to support post-Soviet Russia, the reasons for the tensions that emerged between the two nations, and the roots of the more recent conflicts that have caused a deterioration in U.S.-Russia relations not seen since the late 1970s/early 1980s, and then looks at the prospects for the future.
SIS-676-002
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: SE Asia, US & Regional Powers
Southeast Asia, United States, and Regional Powers (3) This course examines the roles and impact of the United States, Japan and China, and other regional powers on the transformation of security and economic frameworks in East and Southeast Asia from the end of the Second World War to the present. The security analysis treats developments during the Cold War, the Vietnam War, and issues in the post-Cold War era, particularly those pertaining to militant Islamic movements and non-traditional/human security challenges such as transnational labor flows, trafficking in persons, environmental degradation and natural disasters. The economic dimension highlights the impact of globalization on the region, and the emergence and evolution of regional economic cooperation. A major theme is the manner in which growing Chinese political influence and trade initiatives in recent years have impacted on long-standing American security and commercial interests, as well as on Japanese economic interests in the region.
SIS-676-003
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Bridging the Great Divide
Instructional Method: Online. Bridging the Great Divide (3) No two religions are closer together than Judaism and Islam, and yet ironically, no two religions are further apart. This innovative course creates an interfaith dialogue necessary for understanding critical issues in today's world. It explores the history, culture, and theology of Muslims and Jews, reflecting both on similarities and differences, as well as the major challenges. Assisted by leading scholars in the United States and Europe, the course also offers strategies for building bridges between the communities and thus for bridging the political divide in world affairs.
SIS-676-006
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Chinese Politics & Foreign Pol
Chinese Politics and Foreign Policy (3) This course starts with an overview of the process of Chinese politics from 1949 to the present, focusing on the transition from the era of revolution to the era of modernization (reform). It pays close attention to such important issues as the party-state system, political leadership, the role of intellectuals, economic and political reforms, and the demand for democratization. It also examines the decision-making process, state-society relations, and the evolving role of the military, thereby providing a comprehensive framework for understanding contemporary Chinese politics and society. The course provides the background necessary to comprehend the domestic foundations of China's external behavior. Close attention is paid to Chinese foreign policy towards major powers, such as the United States, Japan, Russia, the two Koreas, and other players in Asia Pacific. The course introduces a variety of perspectives as analytical tools for research, and analyzes significant controversies as a way of participating in the field's theoretical and policy debate.
SIS-676-007
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: Comp Pol of Mid East/N. Africa
Instructional Method: Hybrid. Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North Africa (3) This course introduces students to the dynamic politics of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Students examine the region's various political systems and societal structures, as well as aspects of the political economy and role of external actors. Students are also introduced to key theoretical approaches to explaining politics in the region, including theories on democratization and social movement formation. Through historical and contemporary case studies, the course covers a wide range of topics, including the colonial legacy, authoritarian persistence, Islamist politics, civil society and social movement formation, rentier states, and sub- and supra-national identity politics.
SIS-676-202
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Graduate
Section Title: SE Asia, US & Regional Powers
Special Tuition Rate. Southeast Asia, United States, and Regional Powers (3) This course examines the roles and impact of the United States, Japan and China, and other regional powers on the transformation of security and economic frameworks in East and Southeast Asia from the end of the Second World War to the present. The security analysis treats developments during the Cold War, the Vietnam War, and issues in the post-Cold War era, particularly those pertaining to militant Islamic movements and non-traditional/human security challenges such as transnational labor flows, trafficking in persons, environmental degradation and natural disasters. The economic dimension highlights the impact of globalization on the region, and the emergence and evolution of regional economic cooperation. A major theme is the manner in which growing Chinese political influence and trade initiatives in recent years have impacted on long-standing American security and commercial interests, as well as on Japanese economic interests in the region. Restriction: International Relations (MA): Online, International Service (MIS): Online or Social Enterprise (MA): Online. Meets with SIS-676 002.