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INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-310 Topics Peace/Glb Sec/Con Res Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Peace, Global Security, and Conflict Resolution (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics including peace and social justice, international security, causes of war, and human and global security. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Grading: A-F only. Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-210.

SISU-310-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Peace and Int'l Organizations
Peace and International Organizations (3) The UN and other international organizations like the European Union, the African Union and the World Bank have become much more involved in preventing and ending armed conflicts since 1991. This course critically examines the role of international organizations, especially the UN, in peace negotiations, peacekeeping and post-conflict peacebuilding. Students analyze successful and failed cases of peace efforts.
SISU-310-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Dynamics of Intl (In)Security
Dynamics of International (In)Security (3) This course examines questions such as, do states fight more today than in the past; do they fight in different places and in different ways; have the dynamics, the institutions, and the actors that influenced conflict and war in the past changed in recent years, or are they similar in today's international arena. This course looks at some of the main factors that have played a role in producing or preventing conflict in the past, and examines the degree to which they have evolved in today's world. The course looks at, among other issues, alliances, territorial conflicts, civil-military relations, military doctrines, deterrence, and terrorism, through the lenses of past and present cases of war and conflict.
SISU-310-003
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Gender and Conflict
Gender and Conflict (3) Gender continues to be a powerful means through which we see the world and how we see each other. In the context of conflict, social conceptions of gender have been used to justify political and social violence, delineate codes of responsibility for violence and abuse, define roles in the context of war and its aftermath, and legitimize social, economic, and political hierarchies at the micro, meso and macro levels. This course looks critically at questions of power, performance, and privilege and their subsequent implications at each stage of conflict, organized around three models: the militarization of society; the conduct and nature of warfare; and the aftermath of war including peacemaking, peacekeeping, and peace building.
SISU-310-001
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Pol of Conf/Conf Res in Africa
The Politics of Conflict and Conflict Resolution in Africa (3) This course focuses on the politics of recent and on-going large-scale political violence (i.e., lethal contention among social groups and political factions, governmental repression, insurgencies, etc.) in the African context. The course provides students with analytical frameworks for thinking about these different actors and dimensions of conflict, and trains students to formulate and present their own analyses of conflicts.
SISU-310-002
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Gender and Peace Building
Gender and Peace Building (3) Female power is rising worldwide, at a time when sexual violence is also increasing. Gender is also being redefined, and women's roles in peacemaking, peace-building, and peacekeeping are growing. Research shows females have been challenging unjust authority, brokering peace agreements, negotiating ceasefires, and advancing human rights at enormous personal risks, although their contributions are rarely featured in textbooks or official records. This course explores cutting-edge issues of gender and peace from multiple angles and perspectives. Students engage in active-learning and diverse teaching styles.
SISU-310-003
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Comp Authorit: Inst & Pract
Comparative Authoritarianism: Institutions and Practices (3) This course begins with two fundamental questions about authoritarian governance: how authoritarian regimes differ from democracies, and how they differ from each other. The course explores comparative frameworks that differentiate among the diverse forms of dictatorship and focuses on specific cases to examine the dual dilemmas of dictatorship. How can authoritarian governments mobilize necessary political support while simultaneously restricting political freedoms, and how can authoritarian governments encourage economic development and investment without political institutions that inhibit exploitation by government officials? Students gain a nuanced understanding of non-democratic political systems and are able to identify characteristics of autocratic governance, the many ways authoritarian power is exercised by governments, and the unique challenges they face.
SISU-310-004
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Negotiation & Conflict Resol
Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (3) Negotiation is a powerful force if conducted with tactics, strategy, and knowledge of its dynamics. The choice to negotiate fills the conceptual space between coercion and submission. It's what do we do when we can't simply get our way in international affairs. We can threaten, but pure coercion often generates a backlash. We can also yield, but that might diminish credibility and invite predatory behavior. In this seminar students learn how real international negotiations unfold, why they succeed and fail. The course combines theory and history and offers students opportunities to practice and refine their own skills.
SISU-310-001
Term: Summer 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Cltr Confl & Confl Resolution
Instructional Method: Online. Culture, Conflict, and Conflict Resolution (3) Global in scope and comparative in nature, this course seeks to identify, establish, and analyze the role culture plays in the emergence and resolution of conflict. It looks at the ways cultural difference, identity politics, nationalist discourse, competing and fluid worldviews, and similar modes of categorization and practice, make the concept of culture not only relevant but often a key factor in evolution and resolution of conflict. The course places special emphasis on the degree of presence (or absence) of the idea of culture in the field of international relations theory.