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INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-318 Topics Global Sec/Foreign Pol Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Global Security and Foreign Policy (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics focusing on global security and foreign policy. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Grading: A-F only. Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-210 or SISU-230.

SISU-318-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Causes of War
Causes of War (3) Through this course students become familiar with some of the major theoretical issues in the study of global security as well as key actors and institutions. In addition to addressing central issues such as war and conflict, weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism, the course helps students apply theories and existing bodies of knowledge to better understand contemporary and emerging global security issues.
SISU-318-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Insurgency & Counterinsurgency
Insurgency and Counterinsurgency (3) In an age of globalization but unequal distribution of economic resources and political power, insurgencies pose one of the greatest challenges to the established order, whether that order is a democracy, a monarchy, a dictatorship or a theocracy. This course analyzes the historical roots of insurgencies and counterinsurgencies, beginning with the Roman Empire, and assesses the causes, conduct and consequences of these actions, with an emphasis on applications since World War II. Though military aspects are included, the principal focus is on the political, economic, and social forces that have informed and directed insurgents and those who oppose them. Through an understanding of the history of the complex and often misinterpreted field, students seek to define the issues these movements pose and create a framework to assess the factors that precede their rise and shape their outcome.
SISU-318-002
Term: Spring 2019 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Revisionst Chinese/Russian Pol
The Revisionists: Chinese and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy (3) Secretary of Defense James Mattis described China and Russia as "revisionist powers," signaling that, after years of focus on the Middle East and terrorism, great power politics once again sit at the center of U.S. foreign policy. But how have the political elite in these two countries thought about their security in the broadest sense? This course explores how leaders in Beijing and Moscow have historically sought to defend themselves against other competitors from within the regime, their own people, and other great powers. Drawing on international relations and comparative politics, the course applies political science theories to better understand how powerful actors in China and Russia behaved similarly or differently during crucial historical moments, for example, how figures like Deng Xiaoping and Nikita Khrushchev defeated their opponents and became the top leader after the deaths of Mao Zedong and Josef Stalin; why the Chinese regime used force to end protests in 1989, while a coup in the Soviet Union collapsed two years later in the face of widespread opposition; and why the Chinese and Soviets adopted such different nuclear weapons postures. In a final project, students combine theory and evidence to shed light on a crucial aspect of Chinese and/or Russian politics.